Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James C. Johnson or search for James C. Johnson in all documents.

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Six hundred dollars Reward. --Ran away from my stables, on the night of the 28th ultimo, my two Negro men named Albert and Henry. Henry is about twenty-two or twenty-three years old, about five feet six inches high, black, and stammers very badly when talking. Albert is about twenty years old, five feet seven inches high, bright mulatto, with smooth face and very large feet and hands. I will pay the above reward for them, or three hundred dollars for either one, delivered to me at my stables, on Franklin street. They are evidently making their way to the Yankee lines. James C. Johnson, Virginia Stables, Franklin street, Richmond, Virginia. se 3--10t
Six hundred dollars Reward. --Ran away from my stables, on the night of the 28th ultimo, my two Negro men, named Albert and Henry. Henry is about twenty-two or twenty-three years old, about five feet six inches high, black, and stammers very badly when talking. Albert is about twenty years old, five feet seven inches high, bright mulatto, with smooth face and very large feet and hands. I will pay the above reward for them, or three hundred dollars for either one, delivered to me at my stables, on Franklin street. They are evidently making their way to the Yankee lines. James C. Johnson, Virginia Stables, Franklin street, Richmond, Virginia. se 3--10t
icans at this time in Paris, the mass of whom are poor in pocket and distressed in sentiment. I cannot tell you anything better than of some of those who keep you posted in foreign news. The American newspaper correspondents best know here are Johnson and Mortimer, of the New York Times; Huntingdon, of the Tribune; and Buffing, of the Herald. Johnson, the Malakoff of the Times, has a reputation in America beyond his deserts. He is an Ohio man, and graduated a Doctor of Medicine in Paris. I Johnson, the Malakoff of the Times, has a reputation in America beyond his deserts. He is an Ohio man, and graduated a Doctor of Medicine in Paris. I should take him to be thirty-eight or forty years of age. He is large, corpulent and good looking, and has a fair practice among Americans and English. He frequents good society, and is, by all that I have heard, above the average character of correspondents. At the same time there is much smartness and trickery in his letters. Give two rumors and Malakoff will swear to four facts. He has a pretentious way of dealing with State matters which retains me of Samuel Pepys, in the King's Rival.