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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for M. L. Johnson or search for M. L. Johnson in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
ing off great masses of masonry that had been cut loose by the rifles. The four nearest batteries were more than sixteen hundred yards from the fort; four rifled guns in battery Sigel, one of those nearest the fort, had been assigned to the men from the Wabash. The batteries were occupied at daylight, and kept up a steady and well-directed fire until the flag of the fort was hauled down at 2 P. M. Commander Rodgers commended the conduct of Lieutenant Irwin, Master Robertson, and Midshipmen M. L. Johnson and F. H. Pearson, and also of petty officers Lewis Boun and George H. Wood. Before the fort surrendered the barbette guns had been silenced and many of them dismounted. The breach was practicable for storming in two places, and the projectiles were passing through and knocking down the opposite wall, which protected the magazine, so that the garrison was convinced that in an hour or so the magazine must be blown up. Commander Rodgers's report. The heavy Xiii-inch mortars
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
n known to him; many of them had served in the squadron before, and were present at the capture of the Port Royal forts; they were men of the highest professional capacity and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engaged in it. Had any loss of life been regarded as likely to render another attempt successful, there would have been few indeed who would not have desired it. The opinion before the attack was general, and was fully shared in by the writer, that whatever might be the loss in men and vessels, blown up by torpedoes or otherwise destro
clamation of, concerning blockade at Charleston, 78 et seq., 82 I. N. Seymour, the, 177 Iosco, the, 218 Iris, the, 156 Iroquois, the, U. S. vessel, 7 Irwin, Lieutenant, 43; commended, 62 Isaac Smith, the, U. S. vessel, 17, 19, 21, 26, 37, 46, 49 et seq., 52, 72 et seq., 130 Ives, Captain T. P., 179 J. Jacksonville, Fla., 60 et seq. James Adger, the, 84 Jeffers, Lieutenant-Commanding William N., 177, 186 John Adams, the, U. S. sloop, 7 Johnson, Ensign M. L., conduct commended, 62; again commended, 102 Johnson, Neils, 69 Jones, Ensign, 200, 211 Jordan, Thomas, 78 Josselyn, of the Commodore Hull, 210 Judah, the, Confederate privateer, 69 Juniata, the, 156, 222, 228 K. Kansas, the, 210, 228 Kempff, Acting Master, 43 Keokuk, the, 90 et seq., 99 et seq., 116 Keystone State, the, U. S. vessel, 75, 80 et seq. Kitchen, Paymaster, 58 L. Lamb, Colonel, William, 226, 237, et seq., 240 Lamson, Lieu