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The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Molly Johnson or search for Molly Johnson in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1864., [Electronic resource], An examination in a "Subjugated."City. (search)
gro, was ordered to be whipped for obtaining sixty dollars from James McDonald on false pretences.--It appeared that Ben. who is a back driver, went into Mr. McDonald's store on 12th street, near Main, in a great hurry, and represented that Miss Molly Johnson, one of Mc's best customers, was on Main street buying some flour, and had sent to ask Mr. Me to lend her $60. Mr. Mc without hesitation gave the negro the money, but on seeing Miss Johnson learned that she had never sent for any money, andMiss Johnson learned that she had never sent for any money, and that the whole story was a fabrication. Dolly Harris, a free negro, was charged with stealing clothing from Nicholas Carroll. An armful of clothing of various descriptions, was brought into court by the police who had arrested Dolly, and Carroll claimed it all, and also a small amount of silver and copper coin found in her possession. Some of the clothing was proved by white witnesses to belong to the negro, and one pair of black pants were marked J. C. Hobson. The case was continued.
onfessed by a high officer of Government in a communication to Congress, argues a condition of things skin to desperation. Like Richard, the Yankee tyranny has reached the point where all is staked upon the hazard of the die about to be thrown. The opinion of the Secretary was echoed in the Senate. Mr. Sherman said: "The true remedy for our evils, as all know, is the success of our armies." Mr. Chandler thought victories of the Yankee armies would make the "speculators suffer," and Mr. Johnson (Reverdy) thought, "with a vigorous and successful war," the people would allow the debt to be trebled. Of course they would. But as everything, it is conceded, depends on military success, what becomes of Yankeedom if that fails them? Last week there was a vibration of 18 cents in the value of gold — from 171 to 189. It reached the latter, fell back to the former' and rose again to 173. Mr. Chase hurried to New York when it rose so rapidly. His presence stopped operations. Deal