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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for William Samuel Johnson or search for William Samuel Johnson in all documents.

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erned people in the world; and the Charter of Rhode Island, in spite of all its enemies, had vitality enough to outlast the unreformed House of Commons. The bold doctrines of Massachusetts, gained ground, and extended to other Colonies. W. S. Johnson to John Pownail, 27 Feb. 1773. W. S. Johnson to R. Jackson, 26 Feb. 1773. Hutchinson was embarrassed by the controversy, which he had provoked, and would now willingly have ended. Meantime the House made the usual grants to the Justices of tW. S. Johnson to R. Jackson, 26 Feb. 1773. Hutchinson was embarrassed by the controversy, which he had provoked, and would now willingly have ended. Meantime the House made the usual grants to the Justices of the Superior Court; but Message from the House, 3 Feb. 1773; Bradford, 365. the Governor refused his assent because he expected warrants for their salaries from the King. Message to the House, 4 Feb. The House replied: Message from the House, 13 Feb. No Judge who has a due regard to justice, or even to his own character, would choose to be placed under such an undue bias, as they must be under by accepting their salaries of the Crown. We are more and more convinced, that it has been th
Customs, having indiscreetly provoked the populace, was seized, tarred and feathered, and paraded under the gallows. The General Court also assembled, full of a determination to compel the Judges to refuse the salaries proffered by the King. Enough of the prevalence of this spirit was known in England, to raise a greater clamor against the Americans, than had ever before existed. Hypocrites, traitors, rebels and villains were the softest epithets applied to them; Nicholas Ray to W. S. Johnson, London, 4 April, 1774. and some menaced war, and would have given full scope to sanguinary rancor. On the twenty-seventh, the Government received official information, Hutchinson to Dartmouth, 17 Dec. 1773, received 27 January, 1774. that the Chap. LI.} 1774. Jan. people of Boston had thrown the tea overboard, and this event swelled the anger against the Americans. In this state of public feeling, Franklin on the twenty-ninth, assisted by Dunning and John Lee, came before the P
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