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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
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1863. Oren Brown. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Johnson. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Wilson. U. S. gunch appeared to be a special favorite with them, was written by Sergeant Johnson, whom I have before mentioned. He intended it as a parody on ement of a colored prisoner has been found. It is a letter of Sergeant Johnson of the Fifty-fifth Mass., previously referred to, published in, it became necessary to remove them. The rebel armies of Lee and Johnson were being driven into more contracted lines. Under these conditi20, 1865, at Annapolis, Md.; name in list of wounded prisoners. Johnson, Edward. Private, Co. G, wounded; discharged July 16, 1865, at Bete. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsevate. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P.
Co. Jesse Brown. Alfred Green. Cornelius Henson, Co. C. Nathaniel Hurley, Co. E. William Butler. George Mushroom. George Thomas. Solomon Anderson. H. Wm. H. Kirk, Co. H. Wm. H. Worthington, Co. H. John W. Dixon, Co. H, 54th Mass. James Caldwell. John Leatherman. Wm. H. Harrison. Joseph H. Proctor. Enos Smith. Fred Wallace. Isarael Williams. Sergeant Alfred Whiting. Co. I, captured at Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863. Stuart woods. Baltimore Smith. Joseph beard, Co. K. Sergeant Robert Johnson, Jr. Co. F, 55th Mass.; captured at N. Edisto Island, S. C., Nov. 12, 1863. Edward Logan. Co. F, 55th Mass.; captured at N. Edisto Island, S. C., Nov. 12, 1863. Oren Brown. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Johnson. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Wilson. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Taylor. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. James Mellet. U. S. Frigate Wabash; captured at Fort Sumter.
List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Charles H., Private. Proctor, Joseph J., Corp. weeks, John, Private. Co. G. Body, Charles, Private. Myers, William, Privat
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: battle of Ossawatomie. (search)
to save the lives of our friends. Let those who cannot go hitch up their wagons and throw in a few provisions, and get more as they come along by their neighbors, and bring them to Lexington on Wednesday. Let others bring horses and mules, and saddles and guns, --all to come in on Wednesday. We must go immediately. There is no time to spare, and no one must hold back. Let us all do a little, and the job will be light. We want two hundred to three hundred men from this county. Jackson, Johnson, Platte, Clay, Ray, Saline, Carroll, and other counties are now acting in this matter. All of them will send up a company of men, and there will be a concert of action. New Santa Fe, Jackson County, will be the place of rendezvous for the whole crowd, and our motto this time will be, No quarter. Come up, then, on Wednesday, and let us have concert of action. Let no one stay away. We need the old men to advise, the young men to execute. We confidently look for eight hundred to one thous
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the political inquisitors. (search)
it was known that John Brown was not dead, and that three of his followers had been safely protected from the fury of the populace, four political inquisitors hastened down to see him; to extort, if possible, from the lips of the dying chief, or the fears or hopes of the younger captives, confessions that might criminally implicate the champions or friends of the Republican party. From the South came Governor Wise and Senator Mason of Virginia; from the North, a United States Marshal named Johnson, and Mr. Vallandingham, a member of Congress from Ohio. The result of these visits was one of John Brown's greatest victories. From the three published reports of it, carefully compared and corrected, we give the conversation that ensued between the wounded insurrectionists and their cowardly political inquisitors. Never before, in the United States, did a recorded conversation produce so sudden and universal a change of opinion. Before its publication, some, who subsequently eulogi
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: Judicial alacrity. (search)
D. Stephens, Edwin Coppic, Shields Green, and John Copland, then and there them, the said Thomas Boerly, George W. Turner, and Fontaine Beckham, in the manner aforesaid, and by the means aforesaid, feloniously, wilfully, and of their and each of their malice aforethought, did kill and murder, against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Lewis W. Washington, John H. Allstadt, John E. P. Dangerfield, Alexander Kelly, Emanuel Spangler, Armstead M. Ball, Joseph A. Brua, William Johnson, Lewis P. Starry, Archibald H. Kitzmiller, were sworn in open Court this 26th day of October, 1859, to give evidence to the Grand Jury upon this bill of indictment. Teste: Robert T. brown, Clerk. A true copy of said indictment. Teste: Robert T. Brown, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson County, in the State of Virginia. Which bill of indictment the Grand Jury returned this 26th day of October. A true bill. Thomas Rutherford, Foreman. October 26, 1859. Before the indictment
dward Dillon. John F. Jordan. Co. C.Edward C. Doherty. Thomas A. Dow. Reuben B. Dow. James Eckelman. James Eldridge. John Fisher. John Farren. Winslow P. Eayers. Robert H. Eastman. Joseph Frey. George Riese. John Davis. William Barnes. Co. D.James Dunn. John W. Gallagher. Henry G. Fuller. Michael Hogan. Philip Hunt. William Hamilton. Charles Harris. Fred W. Hubner. Andrew P. Green. Michael Gahagin. Co. D.Frank Heill. Charles Ferguson. William Smith. Co. E.William Johnson, Corporal. Julius Rieser. James M. Harrison. Henry Hagedon. Michael Holligan. Alfred Horstman. Peter Kennedy. William B. Kelley. Rodney King. Michael Kenney. George Jones. Robert Slocum. Henry Urban. Co. F.Charles Lynch, Corporal. George Doherty. Jeremiah Lucius. John Larouche. James Lynch. Frank Lopez. William Marshall. John McDonald. Charles Matthews. John M. Duncan. John Mack. Philip Morton. Nelson E. Knights, Sergeant (re-enlisted Jan. 3.) Co. G.Daniel Dale
............................... 249, 262 Johnson, George,...................................................... 330 Johnson, Giles D. W.,..................................... 284, 328 Johnson, Henry,..................................................... 127 Johnson, Loring,...................................................... 324 Johnson, Peter,.................................................... 330, 348 Johnson, President,............................................... 364, 365 Johnson, William,............................................... 292 Johnston, General,................................................... 74 Johnston, Robert A.,............................................. 330, 341 Johonnot, Darius,..................................................... 285 Jones, George,....................................................... 292 Joy, Edward,.................................................... 330, 348 Jordan, John,.................................................
in its provisions that an eminent character of South Carolina, a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States [Hon. William Johnson] had characterized it as trampling on the Constitution, and a direct attack upon the sovereignty of the United Stayou our whole force fit for duty, that are properly clothed and properly equipped, does not amount to eight hundred men.—Johnson's life of Greene, vol. i. p. 340. Writing to Mr. Varnum, a member of Congress, he says:— There is a great spistructive, that it is the greatest folly in the world to trust the liberties of a people to such a precarious defence.— Johnson's Life of Greene, vol. i. p. 397. Nothing can be more authentic or complete than this testimony. Here, also, is wh says:— The slaves a second time flocked to the British army.—Vol. i. p. 336. And at a still later day, Mr. Justice Johnson, of the Supreme Court of the United States, and a citizen of South Carolina, in his elaborate Life of General G
ent against the venerable Senator. Massachusetts had commissioned a distinguished gentleman, of blameless life and eminent professional qualities, who served with honor in the other House [Hon. Samuel Hoar], to reside at Charleston for a brief period, in order to guard the rights of her free colored citizens, assailed on arrival there by an inhospitable statute, so gross in its provisions that an eminent character of South Carolina, a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States [Hon. William Johnson] had characterized it as trampling on the Constitution, and a direct attack upon the sovereignty of the United States. Massachusetts had read in the Constitution a clause closely associated with that touching fugitives from service, to the following effect: The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States, and supposed that this would yet be recognized by South Carolina. But she was mistaken. Her venerable representativ
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