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Upwards of three thousand dollars have been subscribed in Lynchburg, towards a fund of three thousand five hundred dollars, designed to furnish Gen. McCausland with a horse, saddle and bridle, and sword. In the old temples, oracular revelations were received in sleep. A great many people seem to seek for oracular revelations in the same condition in our modern churches. The years pelt a young girl with red roses till her checks are all on fire. By and by they begin throwing white roses, and that morning flush passes away. Brig Gen. H. W. Mercer, of Savannah, has been made a Major General and assigned to a division in Johnston's army.
leave. They represent the army as being much dispirited and averse to prolonging hostilities. Many men whose terms of service expire in July and August have determined not to fight. [Fourth Dispatch.] In the Field Near Rufus Station, July 4. --In order to counteract a flank movement made in force by the enemy on our left, the army commenced to withdraw from the neighborhood of Marietta night before last. The movement was conducted in a successful manner characteristic of Gen. Johnston. Gen. Hardee's Corps, though in some places not more than 40 or 50 yards from the enemy's lines, did not begin to move until just before daylight yesterday, and the movement was conducted so quietly that the enemy was not aware of it until the evacuation was completed. Not a gun was fired along the line during the night except from Kennesaw Mountain. About sunrise the enemy hoisted their flag on Kennesaw. An hour or two later they advanced, leaving Marietta to the left and passed
From Georgia — Gen Johnston's farewell address, etc. Atlanta, July 18. --The army and public were surprised this morning by the announcement of the change of commanders--Gen. Johnston being relieved, and General Hood receiving the command. The following is Gen. Johnston's farewell address to the troops: Heacommanders--Gen. Johnston being relieved, and General Hood receiving the command. The following is Gen. Johnston's farewell address to the troops: Headquarters Army of Tennessee, July 17, 1864.--In obedience to the orders of the War Department, I turn over to Gen Hood the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee. I cannot leave this noble army without expressing my admiration of the high military qualities it has displayed so conspicuously — every soldierly virtue, endurGen. Johnston's farewell address to the troops: Headquarters Army of Tennessee, July 17, 1864.--In obedience to the orders of the War Department, I turn over to Gen Hood the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee. I cannot leave this noble army without expressing my admiration of the high military qualities it has displayed so conspicuously — every soldierly virtue, endurance of toil, obedience to orders, brilliant courage. The enemy has never attacked but to be severely repulsed and punished. You, soldiers, have never argued but from your courage, and never counted your fears. No longer your leader, I will still watch your career, and will rejoice in your victorian.--To one and all I offer <
oad, however, and we may catch them there yet. How Gen Johnston crossed the Chattahoochee. The public, who believed that the Chattahoochee river was the point at which Gen. Johnston was to make a stand against Sherman, ill read with interess absolutely effervescing. Falling back from Marietta, Gen. Johnston established his long chosen line along the Chattahoochemade in accordance with a new line of policy adopted by Gen. Johnston. The fact, however, became evident yesterday that the d while I write skirmishing is going on in front. Gen. Johnston has established his headquarters only two and a half mi confess myself at a loss what to say in the premises. Gen. Johnston is stern, severe and reticent. One can only draw conclbe waging in bloody fury. It is not less probable that Gen. Johnston will still continue his retreat to some other point. I, and satisfied, in their ignorance of the future, that Gen. Johnston will in due time work out his own plan and secure succe
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