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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
espair. Now it was E. Kirby Smith, and now Joe Johnston, who was at the gates. The faith that somen; some were captured and some deserted. General Johnston had ten dispatches from Pemberton during y with reference to the supposed movements of Johnston and E. K. Smith. One day the forces had gone ief ought not to be less than 40,000 men. General Johnston asserts that his force never amounted to r. On that date, General Pemberton asked General Johnston to treat with Grant for the surrender of the switch, to throw the trains, on which General Johnston was removing supplies from Jackson, from duction of Vicksburg; while the effectives of Johnston and Pemberton combined-and they were never coned-never reached one-third that number. General Johnston was too sick when he arrived at Jackson ton exactly opposite military principles. General Johnston was not in accord with the Richmond gover' Depot, an act of independence for which General Johnston warmly lauds the latter. The effect o[17 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
faith that was in him --indeed, could make an argument in favor of the justice of his cause, which it would puzzle the ablest lawyer on the other side to answer. And thus they marched forth gayly to battle, and needed not the spur of discipline to drive them on. Personal devotion to their leaders was also an important element in their discipline and morale. They ceased their loud murmurs against retreating from Darksville without fighting Patterson, because their honored chief ( old Joe Johnston ) said it was best not to do so, and they started with the utmost enthusiasm from Winchester to Manassas, because he told them, in general orders, that it was a forced march to save the country. They would march, many of them barefooted, thirty or forty miles a day, because Old Stonewall said they must press forward to accomplish important results, and because he would frequently gallop along the column and give them a chance to cheer him. And they would make the welkin ring with General
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Van Dorn, the hero of Mississippi. (search)
them was shot through the body, the point of the arrow just protruding through the skin. No surgeon was at hand. Van Dorn, reflecting that to withdraw the arrow would leave the barbed head in his body, thrust it on through, and left the surgeon little to do. When the States resumed their State sovereignty, he took a bold and efficient part in securing to Texas, where he was serving, all of the war material within her borders. Early in the war he was ordered to join the army under General Joe Johnston at Manassas; whence soon after, in February, 1861, he was ordered to take command of the Trans-Mississippi Department. I was associated with him in this command as chief of his staff, and saw him daily for many months. He had conceived the bold project of capturing St. Louis and transferring the war into Illinois, and was actively engaged in preparing for this enterprise when he was summoned by General Price to Boston Mountain, where the forces of Price and McCulloch lay in great
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
eph E. Johnston was at Jackson, at the Lamar House, in the full tide of a brilliant reception, an old negro woman, in a coarse sunbonnet, with a cotton umbrella under her arm, rapped at the door, and asked: Is dis Mr. Johnston's room? Yes. Mr. Joe Johnston's room? Yes. I wants to see him, den ; and in marched the old lady, going up to the distinguished soldier, and laying her hand familiarly upon his epauleted shoulder. Johnston turned, a look of surprise and gladness overspread his face, hJohnston turned, a look of surprise and gladness overspread his face, he took both the bony, bird-claw hands warmly in his own, and exclaimed: Why, aunt Judy Paxton! The old negress scanned his features with tears in her eyes, and at last said, in a querulous treble, made touching with undisguised emotion: Mister Joe, you is gittin‘ old. Then, patting his hand, the old nurse turned half apologetically to the assemblage, and said: Dis here's my own boy. Many's de time I's toted you in dese yere arms; didn't I, honey? Such a scene would be strange elsewhere, but i
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
en grappling with each other since early morning,and, in their mutual slaughter, took no note of the sacredness of the day, nor its brightness. In Washington General Scott was anxiously awaiting the result of his skilful plan of battle, and General Johnston had come down from the Valley of Virginia, in response to Beauregard's appeal-If you will help me, now is the time. Hotly had the field been contested, and the hours passed slowly to men who had never tasted of battle before. Wavering had eneral Lee, on horseback or off, was the handsomest man I ever saw. It was said of Wade Hampton, that he looked as knightly when mounted as if he had stepped out from an old canvas, horse and all. Breckenridge was a model of manly beauty, and Joe Johnston looked every inch a soldier. None of these things can be said of Jackson. Akin to his dyspepsia, and perhaps as a consequence, was his ignorance of music. One morning, at Ashland, he startled a young lady from her propriety by gravely as