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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 31: from the Rapidan to the James. (search)
est of the corps, carrying Ramseur with me. Ewell's corps contained three divisions of infantry, to wit: Johnson's, Rodes' and my own (Early's). At this time one of my brigades (Hoke's) was absent, having been with Hoke in North Carolina; and I had only three present, to wit: Hays', Pegram's and Gordon's. One of Rodes' brigades (R. D. Johnston's) was at Hanover Junction. I had about 4,000 muskets for duty; Johnson about the same number; and Rodes (including Johnston's brigade) about 6,000. est of the corps, carrying Ramseur with me. Ewell's corps contained three divisions of infantry, to wit: Johnson's, Rodes' and my own (Early's). At this time one of my brigades (Hoke's) was absent, having been with Hoke in North Carolina; and I had only three present, to wit: Hays', Pegram's and Gordon's. One of Rodes' brigades (R. D. Johnston's) was at Hanover Junction. I had about 4,000 muskets for duty; Johnson about the same number; and Rodes (including Johnston's brigade) about 6,000.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 32: battles of the Wilderness. (search)
take steps to prevent its getting to our rear; and Johnston's brigade, of Rodes' division, which had just arri my division; and, during my absence while posting Johnston's brigade, he reported the fact to General Ewell, ined to make it with Gordon's brigade supported by Johnston's and to follow it up, if successful, with the ref the woods in which the enemy's right rested, and Johnston's in the rear, with orders to follow Gordon and obthrown into disorder. In going through the woods, Johnston had obliqued too much and passed to Gordon's left,ance of Pegram's brigade, and the demonstration of Johnston's brigade in the rear, where it encountered a partks in front of my whole line and a good portion of Johnston's. Between the lines a large number of his dead ha abandoned the left side of the road, across which Johnston's line extended, and my division and a part of hisier general had been killed in the Wilderness, and Johnston's brigade from Rodes' division to mine; and assign
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 34: operations near Hanover Junction. (search)
s, I rode in the direction taken by Ewell's corps, and overtook it, a short time before day on the morning of the 22nd. Hoke's brigade, under Lieutenant Colonel Lewis, this day joined us from Petersburg, and an order was issued, transferring Gordon's brigade, now under the command of Brigadier General Evans, to Johnson's division, which was placed under the command of General Gordon, who had been made a major general. This left me in command of three brigades, to wit: Pegram's, Hoke's and Johnston's, all of which were very much reduced in strength. My Adjutant General, Major Daniel, had been disabled for life by a wound received at the Wilderness, and my Inspector General, Major Samuel Hale, had been mortally wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House on the 12th while serving with the division and acting with great gallantry during the disorder which ensued after Ewell's line was broken. Both were serious losses to me. On this day (the 22nd) we moved to Hanover Junction, and, next d
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 37: pursuit of Hunter. (search)
een engaged in all the great battles from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor, sustaining very heavy losses at Spottsylvania Court-House, where it lost nearly an entire division, including its commander, Major General Johnson, who was made prisoner. Of the brigadier generals with it at the commencement of the campaign, only one remained in command of his brigade. Two (Gordon and Ramseur) had been made Major Generals; one (G. H. Stewart) had been captured; four (Pegram, Hays, J. A. Walker and R. D. Johnston) had been severely wounded; and four (Stafford, J. M. Jones, Daniel, and Doles) had been killed in action. Constant exposure to the weather, a limited supply of provisions, and two weeks service in the swamps north of the Chickahominy had told on the health of the men. Divisions were not stronger than brigades ought to have been, nor brigades than regiments. On the morning of the 13th, at two o'clock, we commenced the march; and on the 16th, arrived at Rivanna River near Charlottesv
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Conclusion. (search)
of the cause of his country. As to those among my countrymen who judged me harshly, I have not a word of reproach. When there was so much at stake, it was not unnatural that persons entirely ignorant of the facts, and forming their opinions from the many false reports set afloat in a time of terrible war and public suffering, should pass erroneous and severe judgments on those commanders who met with reverses. I was not embraced in the terms of General Lee's surrender or that of General Johnston, and, as the order relieving me from command had also relieved me from all embarrassment as to the troops which had been under me, as soon as I was in a condition to travel, I started on horseback for the Trans-Mississippi Department to join the army of General Kirby Smith, should it hold out; with the hope of at least meeting an honorable death while fighting under the flag of my country. Before I reached that Department, Smith's army had also been surrendered, and, without giving a p
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Appendix: the testimony of letters. (search)
ly from warm personal friends and received in the course of private correspondence. The first is from the pen of the beloved leader and is followed by tributes from Jefferson Davis, Generals D. H. Hill and W. H. Payne, Colonels Marshall and Johnston, Senator John W. Daniel, Professors Peters and Venable, Dr. McGuire, and others,--if less known to fame,--none the less ardent in the expression of their regard. Lexington, Va., Nov., 1865. General J. A. Early: I received last night your letterhave driven Sheridan into the Potomac. (4th) Now observe. After Kernstown, Jackson fell back up the valley, was reinforced by Ewell; the latter was left to hold Banks in check. Jackson marched with his own force, 4,500 men, took command of Johnston's force of two brigades, 3,500 men, defeated Milroy, 7,000 men, returned centre with Ewell and with a force, now something over 20,000, expelled Banks (who commanded not over 7,000) from the valley. When threatened by Fremont from the west and
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
, Elliot, 263 Johnson, General B. T., 78, 381, 384, 386, 392, 394, 401, 405, 407, 410, 416, 421 Johnson, General, Edw., 236-240, 243, 249, 250, 252-55, 263, 270-73, 275-76, 278, 281, 284, 304, 306, 307, 318-23, 325, 345-47, 349, 351, 355, 359 Johnson's Battery, 122, 123 Johnson's Cavalry, 385 Johnston, Colonel, Wm. P., 473, 476 Johnston, General, Jos. E., 2, 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, 21, 22, 27, 29, 31, 33, 34-36, 38, 41, 43-44, 51-52, 54- 55, 58, 62-63, 65, 74, 468, 475 Johnston, General R. D., 345, 348-49, 350-51, 359 Jones' Battalion, 267, 304, 374-75 Jones' Brigade, 346, 381 Jones, Colonel, 26 Jones, Colonel Hilary P., 238-39, 241, 247-48, 253-54 Jones, General D. R., 3-7, 15-19, 31, 33, 58, 76, 105, 132, 140, 147, 151, 163 Jones, General J. R., 140-41, 143, 155, 163, 186, 191, 236, 382 Jones, General, Saml., 331 Jones, General W. E., 370 Jones, Lieutenant Colonel J. M., 236, 322 Jordan Springs, 414 Junction, 12, 36, 49, 53-54, 114-15, 117
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Pegram's Brigade. (f) Brig.-Gen. Gordon's Brigade. (g) Brig.-Gen. R. F. Hoke's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson's division. Stonewall Brig. (Brig.-Gen. J. A. Walker). (h) Brig.-Gen. J. M. Jones' Brigade. (h). Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Stewart's Brigade.(h). Brig.-Gen. L. A. Stafford's Brigade. (e). Maj.-Gen. R. E. Rodes' division. Brig.-Gen. J. Daniel's Brigade. (i) Brig.-Gen. Geo. Dole's Brigade. (k) Brig.-Gen. S. D. Ramseur's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. C. A. Battle's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. R. D. Johnston's Brigade. (f).. Third Army corps: Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Hill, Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Wm. Mahone's division. (l) Brig.-Gen. J. C. C. Sanders' Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Mahone's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. N. H. Harris's Brigade. (m) Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Joseph Finegan's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. M. Wilcox's division. Brig.-Gen. E. L. Thomas's Brigade. (n) Brig.-Gen. James H. Lane's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Alfred M. Scale's Brigade
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
ptains present (West, Robinison, James M. Taylor,Thomas N. Jordan) were reported as wounded July 1; Robinson and Taylor as having rejoined July 2, but it does not appear who commanded during Robinson's absence. Capt. Speight B. West, Capt. Benjamin Robinson; 12th N. C., Lieut.-Col. W. S. Davis; 20th N. C., Lieutenant-Colonel Slough and Major John S. Brooks reported as wounded at four P. M., July 1. Lieut.-Col. Nelson Slough, Capt. Lewis T. Hicks; 23d N. C., Colonel Christie, Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston, Major C. C. Blacknall, and the senior captain (Abner D. Pearce) reported as wounded early in the fight, July 1. Col. D. H. Christie, Capt. William H. Johnston. Ramseur's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. D. Ramseur; 2d N. C., Maj. D. W. Hurtt, Capt. James T. Scales; 4th N. C., Col. Bryan Grimes; 14th N. C., Col. R. Tyler Bennett, Maj. Joseph H. Lambeth; 30th N. C., Col. Francis M. Parker, Maj. W. W. Sillers. O'Neal's Brigade, Col. E. A. O'Neal; 3d Ala., Col. C. A. Battle; 5th Ala., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Col. E. A. Perry; 2d Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor; 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae, Maj. P. J. Sinclair; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie, Lieut.-Col. R. D. Johnston (w); 24th Va., Maj. Richard L. Maury (w); 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds; Ala. Battery, Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 98; w, 600; in, 42 = 740.1 brigade of Kearny's division, about 1500; and 1 brigade and 2 regiments of Hooker's division, about 3500; there was no artillery with Kearny and Hooker. General Johnston estimates the strength of his army at 73,928. Other authorities place it at 62,696. The Official Records show that, on the 21st of May, Johnston's army wasJohnston's army was 53,688: Smith's division, 10,592; Longstreet's division, 13,816; Magruder's division (including D. R. Jones's division), 15,920; D. H. Hill's division, 11,151; cavalry and reserve artillery, 2209. Before May 31st, this force was increased by the arrival of A. P. Hill's division (estimated), 4000, and Huger's division (estimated)
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