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wounded, it was deemed necessary by the committee appointed to receive them to set a strong guard to prevent the pressure of the people around the train when it should arrive. By this means the track and a considerable space on either side of it was kept clear, though the car-tops, fences, and all the eminences in the vicinity were thronged with the expectant crowd. At 7 1/4 o'clock, the first train arrived, bringing 20 wounded soldiers, and the bodies of four of our dead--Gen. Bartow, Col. Johnston, a private of the Montgomery Guard named James Driscoll, and another whose name we could not learn. During the excitement attending the anxious inquiries after friends, and the crowding to look upon the dead and wounded, it was whispered through the crowd that President Davis was on the train. Immediately a rush was made in search of the distinguished statesman and chieftain, and a thousand shouts rent the air with wild huzzas as his well-known face and figure were discovered. Tho
e fight, our army was on the eve of being defeated. This was in the early part of the afternoon. Scattered and exhausted as were our men, victory, for a time, inclined to favor the overwhelming army of the enemy, and its General, believing he had gained a victory, despatched the news to Washington. Happily, at this critical juncture, Kershaw, Cash, and Kemper stemmed and turned the adverse tide, driving the frightened foe before their accurate fire and rapid charges. Both Beauregard and Johnston rallied their forces, and led them in person to the attack. Soon after, Elzey's and Smith's brigades, of about four thousand men, came up opportunely and reinforced our army. This reinforcement, with the heroic rally made by the Generals, after Kershaw turned the tide of battle in our favor, decided the fortunes of the field. A member of the Palmetto Guard writes to the Mercury as follows:-- The day was lost when our two regiments came up. Our troops were falling back, and had ret
An English officer asserts that he met one of Gen. Johnston's aids in New York on Sunday, and that he personally knew him to be such. The rebel spy — for he was nothing else — told the Englishman that Messrs. Davis, Beauregard, Lee and Co. consider their victory at Bull Run as a defeat, in comparison with what they expected and ought to have made it. They had their lines so skilfully arranged as to draw us within and beyond their flanks — to catch us in the most deadly kind of trap, attacter, and, instead of going straight to the Junction, as had been positively ordered by Beauregard, he stopped the cars near the battle-field, formed his men in solid squares, and marched superbly to the ground. This was the reserve which our tired forces saw coming against them, and before which they retreated in time to escape the snare laid for them. Johnston's aid affirmed that Smith was in high disfavor for his error, which was the only movement that saved the Federal army.--N. Y. Wo
sportation shall enable him to make an invasion of the Carolina and Georgia coast. It is well known now that Gen. Beauregard's forces at Manassas, previous to Johnston's arrival, were comparatively small; and even after Johnston came, the combined army could not have exceeded forty thousand effective men. Since the battle, we hJohnston came, the combined army could not have exceeded forty thousand effective men. Since the battle, we have good reason to believe that Beauregard and Johnston have under their command much more than a hundred thousand men — enough for all practical purposes. It is not the want of men that has prevented an advance, but the lack of means of transportation, and the lack of food, coupled with sickness. Beauregard has been almost wholJohnston have under their command much more than a hundred thousand men — enough for all practical purposes. It is not the want of men that has prevented an advance, but the lack of means of transportation, and the lack of food, coupled with sickness. Beauregard has been almost wholly without means of transportation for his vast army, and proper food in sufficient quantity, as we have reason to believe. And men who fought the great fight on the 21st, and came out of it without so much as a scratch, were in no condition to do military duty for several days. With little food of suitable quality, fatigued, wo
The Shriver Grays. --A company with this designation, from the city of Wheeling, took part in the hottest of the battle at Manassas on the 21st inst. This company was formed at Wheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a sto
the enemy: Under such a thorough defeat, rout, and disorganization of the Federal army, it might have been driven from Virginia; and Alexandria, Arlington, and all their intrenchments and guns on this side the Potomac taken. Great as the victory has been, its results would have been incalculable could we have pursued the flying and terror-stricken enemy to the Long Bridge. And why was it not done? Simply because Beauregard had not the force. Though only a part of the army was engaged in actual battle, all had been on active duty the whole day. The combined forces of Beauregard and Johnston did not exceed thirty-five thousand men in the field. At least half of these were engaged in the fight. The rest were under the fire of the enemy's guns, with an occasional encounter. All, in fact, were on the battle-field and in battle-array, from the earliest hour in the morning till the defeat in the evening. Every man was needed. There were no reserves.--Boston Transcript, Aug. 10.
led or wounded at the battle of Bull Run: Killed or mortally wounded.--Gen. Bernard E. Bee, South Carolina; Gen. Francis S. Bartow, Georgia; Col. Nelson, Second Virginia regiment; Col. Fisher, Sixth North Carolina regiment; Col. Mason, of General Johnston's staff; Lieut.-Col. Ben. F. Johnson, Hampton Legion; Major Robert Wheat, Louisiana Battalion. Wounded.--Gen. Kirby Smith, regular army; Col. Wade Hampton, Hampton Legion; Col. L. J. Gartrell, Seventh Virginia regiment; Col. Jones, Fourth Alabama regiment; Col. Thomas, of Gen. Johnston's staff; Col. H. C. Stevens, of Gen. Bee's staff; Major Scott, Fourth Alabama regiment. Gen. Bee, one of their killed, was a West Point cadet of 1844, and won distinction in the Mexican war. Gen. Bartow was a prominent Georgia politician. Major Wheat is a well-known filibuster. He was killed by a sergeant of the Second New Hampshire regiment, while in advance of his battalion, leading them on to the charge, after which they fled in every dir
chusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and noted Pratt street; had a glimpse of Fort McHenry, (we had been told that the retreat would make a rise of a troublous tide in this region, but didn't see it,) and at half-past 10 were fairly pressed. into the densest of excited crowds at th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
chusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and noted Pratt street; had a glimpse of Fort McHenry, (we had been told that the retreat would make a rise of a troublous tide in this region, but didn't see it,) and at half-past 10 were fairly pressed. into the densest of excited crowds at th
honor, nor its courage, nor its hopes, not its resolution to conquer. One of those chances to which the fortunes of war are ever subject, and against which the most consummate generalship cannot at all times provide, has given a momentary advantage to the forces of rebellion. Grouchy did not pursue the column of Bulow, and thus Waterloo was won for Wellington at the very moment that victory, with her laurelled wreath, seemed stooping over the head of Napoleon. So Patterson did not pursue Johnston, and the over-whelming concentration of rebel troops that in consequence ensued, was probably the true cause why the army of the United States was driven back, excellent as was its discipline and self-sacrificing as had been its feats of valor. Panics, from slight and seemingly insignificant causes, have occurred in the best drilled and bravest of armies, and they prove neither the want of discipline nor of courage on the part of the soldiers. This check has taught us invaluable lessons
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