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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
t upon Banks's line, to where he halted again in doubt, the distance was one mile and a half. It was the intention of the enemy to reach Culpeper that night; but the vigorous attack upon his battery, The enemy admit in official reports that the battery which opened upon us at midnight was silenced, causing Captain Pegram severe loss, and compelling him to withdraw. the report of his most reliable scout that the enemy was but a few hundred yards in advance, and the additional fact that Colonel Jones, of the Seventh Virginia Cavalry, reported that he had learned from some prisoners taken that Federal reinforcements had arrived, induced Jackson to think it prudent to halt. Jackson's Report. It was not until morning that Jackson added to this prudent resolve yet another, which was, not to fight Pope again on that ground. He gave as his reason that he was convinced that Pope would have sixty thousand men before he could resume. Dabney's Life of Jackson. When we consider that
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Appendix C: Report of surgeon Lafayette Guild, Confederate State Army, medical Director, of the killed and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. (search)
0 27th VirginiaWinder'sJackson's3330 88d VirginiaWinder'sJackson's1515150 BatteriesWinder'sJackson's3330 21st VirginiaJones'sJackson's37851221220 42d VirginiaJones'sJackson's36711071070 48th VirginiaJones'sJackson's184462620 1st Virginia BattJones'sJackson's36711071070 48th VirginiaJones'sJackson's184462620 1st Virginia BattalionJones'sJackson's1010100 10th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's63743430 28d VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's31518180 87th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 47th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's12617Jones'sJackson's184462620 1st Virginia BattalionJones'sJackson's1010100 10th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's63743430 28d VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's31518180 87th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 47th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's25770 15th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryJones'sJackson's1010100 10th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's63743430 28d VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's31518180 87th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 47th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's25770 15th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryStarke'sJackson's2220 7th Virginia CavalryAshby'sJackson's1616160 17th Virginia BatteryAshby'sJackson's12330 Maj. Andrews, Chief of artillery Ashby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's12425250 31st Vi
n, and also of impressions of Niagara, seen for the first time on this journey, are given in a letter sent back to Cincinnati during its progress. In it she says of her fellow-travelers:-- Then there was a portly, rosy, clever Mr. Smith, or Jones, or something the like; and a New Orleans girl looking like distraction, as far as dress is concerned, but with the prettiest language and softest intonations in the world, and one of those faces which, while you say it is n't handsome, keeps you or that gentleman who is so accommodating. Yet our friend, withal, is of Irish extraction, and I have seen him roused to talk with both hands and a dozen words in a breath. He fell into a little talk about abolition and slavery with our good Mr. Jones, a man whose mode of reasoning consists in repeating the same sentence at regular intervals as long as you choose to answer it. This man, who was finally convinced that negroes were black, used it as an irrefragible argument to all that could b
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
Tasso, by Goethe, translated, 47, 63, 188. Taylor, Helen, 281. Tennyson, Alfred, 69, 220. The great Lawsuit (essay L, Dial ), 200. The Third thought, 285. Thoreau, H. D., 130, 134, 144, 154, 155, 164, 282. Thorndike, Mrs., 86. Ticknor, George, 33. Tieck, Louis, 45. Tocqueville, A. de, 126. Transcendental movement, the, 133, 314. Tribune, New York, papers in, 213. Trimmer, Mrs., 132. Tuckerman, J. F., 163. U. Uhland, J. L. 45. V. Vaughan, Mr., 149. Very, Jones, 144, 146. Visconti, Marchesa, 231. W. Ward, Anna (Barker), 36, 68. Ward, Samuel G., letter to, 66. Wayland, Francis, 90. Webster, Daniel, 86. Webster, Mrs. J. W., 35. Weiss, John, 3. Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Minna 192, 193 Whitman, Sarah Helen, 199. Whittier, John G., 131. Williams, Abraham 10. Willis, N. P., 80, 229. Wilson, William D., 144,163. Woman in the Nineteenth Century, 202, 287. Woodward, E., 41. Wordsworth William, 46, 134, 223-8 226, 229, 21, 291.
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
I talked to pretty Mrs. H. who knows the pre-Raphaelite people and confirmed my impression of a very false and artificial vein among them. She knows a set of artists who rendezvous at Hampstead Heath and every evening dress in costumes of the last century and try to get away from the commonplace present; they go so far as to have numbers of Addision's Spectator reprinted with modern dates so as to keep up the atmosphere of Queen Anne's day. This was almost past believing. She knows Burne-Jones well and says he is a very simple person. Dined with the Edwin Arnolds . . . . She was Fanny Channing, a tall, elegant, attractive woman and a most adoring wife of a loving husband. There is something un-English about Arnold, perhaps from his long life in the East and his poetic nature. He is delightful when not talking politics, but there he is so vehement as to be a little fatiguing though always in a gentle, graceful way. He is a small man with a pleasing face. . . . He is somewhat
Miss Ruby10 Waldo Street Higgins, Walter20 Austin Street Holmes, Mrs. E. C.214 Broadway Holmes, Miss Edna214 Broadway Holt, Miss Mary72 Boston Street Hineman, Mr. and Mrs. J. B.42 Greenville Street Horton, Mr. and Mrs. David36 Everett Avenue Horton, George 36 Everett Avenue Horton, Miss Adeline78 Pearl Street Houghton, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar W.20 Gilman Terrace Howe, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B.24 Pleasant Avenue Jacobs, Mrs. Beulah 9 Gilman Street Jerauld, Mrs. H. D.14 Chester Avenue Jones, Mrs. Chester U.55 Oliver Street Keene, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney56 Chauncey Avenue Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. James E.37 Montrose Street Kimpton, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph40 Gilman Street Kirkpatrick, Charles A. Franklin, N. H. Knapp, Mrs. O. S. 28 School Street Knapp, Miss Daisy28 School Street Knapp, Miss Marion28 School Street Lapham, Mr. and Mrs. F. DeWitt3 Hathorn Street Landon, Mr. and Mrs. S. S.179 Pearl Street Leathers, Mr. and Mrs. H. H.147 Willow Avenue Leavitt, Mrs. Jennie M.21 Shawmut
ins, Fred19-A Morton Street Jacobs, Helen59 Gilman Street Jacobs, Leon 59 Gilman Street Jacobs, Cyril59 Gilman Street Jerauld, Mrs. H. D.14 Chester Avenue Jones, Mrs. Grace 55 Oliver Street Jones, Jessie55 Oliver Street Jones, Grace55 Oliver Street Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. James E.34 Montrose Street Kelley, Walter 34 MontJones, Jessie55 Oliver Street Jones, Grace55 Oliver Street Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. James E.34 Montrose Street Kelley, Walter 34 Montrose Street Kenny, Ellen51 Munroe Street Kenny, Russell 82 Boston Street Kenny, Robert 82 Boston Street Kennelly, Maud13 Pinckney Street Kimball, Dorothy 9 North Union Street Kimpton, Anna 40 Gilman Street Landon, Raymond179 Pearl Street Landon, Helen179 Pearl Street Landon, Grace179 Pearl Street Landry, Esther117 WashingJones, Grace55 Oliver Street Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. James E.34 Montrose Street Kelley, Walter 34 Montrose Street Kenny, Ellen51 Munroe Street Kenny, Russell 82 Boston Street Kenny, Robert 82 Boston Street Kennelly, Maud13 Pinckney Street Kimball, Dorothy 9 North Union Street Kimpton, Anna 40 Gilman Street Landon, Raymond179 Pearl Street Landon, Helen179 Pearl Street Landon, Grace179 Pearl Street Landry, Esther117 Washington Street Landry, Richard117 Washington Street Lapham, Mrs. F. DeWitt3 Hathorn Street Leavitt, Lillian13 Pinckney Street Leavitt, Herbert21 Shawmut Street Lemery, Olive50 Joy Street Linnell, Florence33 Bonair Street Linnell, Clara33 Bonair Street Litchfield, Edith181 Broadway Little, William237 Broadway Longfellow, Gussi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, VII: Henry David Thoreau (search)
repress the publication of his manuscripts. Yet this plain, shy, retired student, who when thirty-two years old carried the unsold edition of his first book upon his back to his attic chamber; who died at forty-four still unknown to the general public; this child of obscurity, who printed but two volumes during his lifetime, has had ten volumes of his writings published by others since his death, while four biographies of him have been issued in America (by Emerson, Channing, Sanborn, and Jones), besides two in England (by Page and Salt). Thoreau was born in Boston on July 12, 1817, but spent most of his life in Concord, Massachusetts, where he taught school and was for three years an inmate of the family of Ralph Waldo Emerson, practicing at various times the art of pencil-making — his father's occupation — and also of surveying, carpentering, and housekeeping. So identified was he with the place that Emerson speaks of it in one case as Thoreau's native town. Yet from that ve
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 13: the Jeffersonian. (search)
the hand of Mr. Wise, promptly responded to by Mr. Cilley through Gen. Jones of Wisconsin. The weapons selected by Mr. Cilley were rifles; ulty in procuring a rifle, and asked time, which was granted; and Gen. Jones, Mr. Cilley's second, tendered him the use of his own rifle; but,it was suspended to give room for explanation. Mr. Wise remarked—Mr. Jones, these gentlemen have come here without animosity towards each ot not to be drawn into any controversy with Colonel Webb. This is Mr. Jones' version; Mr. Wise thinks he said, My friend refuses to disclaim of opinion as to him. After consultation, Mr. Wise returned to Mr. Jones and said, Mr. Jones, this answer leaves Mr. Graves precisely in tMr. Jones, this answer leaves Mr. Graves precisely in the position in which he stood when the challenge was sent. Another exchange of shots was now had to no purpose, and another attempt at recnded, Mr. Graves expressed a wish to see him, and was answered by Mr. Jones—My friend is dead, sir! Colonel Webb first heard of the diffic
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 28: day and night in the Tribune office. (search)
under the heads of Cleared, Arrived, Disasters, To mariners, Spoken, Whalers, Foreign Ports, Domestic Ports, Passengers sailed, Passengers arrived, it presents daily a mass and a variety of facts, which do not astound us, only because we see the wonder daily repeated. Nor is the shipping intelligence a mere catalogue of names, places and figures. Witness these sentences cut almost at random from the dense columns of small type in which the affairs of the sea are printed: Bark Gen. Jones, (of Boston,) Hodgden, London 47 days, chalk to E. S. Belknap & Sons. Aug. 14, lat. 50° 11′, lon. 9° 20′, spoke ship Merensa, of Boston, 19 days from Eastport for London. Aug. 19, signalized a ship showing Nos. 55, 31, steering E. Aug. 20, signalized ship Isaac Allerton, of New York. Sept. 1, spoke Br. Emerald, and supplied her with some provisions. Sept. 13, lat. 43° 36′, lon. 49° 54′, passed a number of empty barrels and broken pieces of oars. Sept. 13, lat 43°, long 50° 40′,
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