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iably lost its field officers. It is one of the most gallant regiments of the Stonewall Brigade, and has frequently had what is called the post of honour. Colonel Allen, Colonel Botts, Lieutenant-Colonel Lackland, Lieutenant-Colonel Colston, Major Jones, and now Colonel Randolph, have fallen! and Colonel Nadenboush, of the same regiment, has been so mutilated by wounds, as to be obliged to retire from the service. The fleet upon James River has landed about 30,000 or 40,000 troops. One at the expense of the discomfited surgeon. The ladies frequently afterwards heard him bored with the question, Doctor, when do you go to the Libby? June 12th, 1864. I am grieved to say that we have had a reverse in the Valley, and that General Jones, of the cavalry, has been killed, and his command repulsed. They have fallen back to Waynesborough, leaving Staunton in the hands of the enemy. General Johnston is doing well in Georgia. Oh, that he may use up Sherman entirely! We are get
en euphonize as the South! ), and loyalty to venerable rye; and of the most friendly feelings, too, toward Parson Brownlow, Virginia short-cut, and the Honorable Mr. Jones, his representative in Congress. He praised Mr. Jones first and foremost: Jones was bound to be President, he said, and had come down here (but I mustn't tell nMr. Jones first and foremost: Jones was bound to be President, he said, and had come down here (but I mustn't tell nary one about it) to put himself right with the South Carolina fire-eaters, who were offended at a Union speech that he had recently delivered in New York city! Couldn't I help him out of his fix by giving him a good notice — right kind, you know, of pitchina into him, eh? That was a d----d good fellow? Wouldn't I take a chaw? Jones was bound to be President, he said, and had come down here (but I mustn't tell nary one about it) to put himself right with the South Carolina fire-eaters, who were offended at a Union speech that he had recently delivered in New York city! Couldn't I help him out of his fix by giving him a good notice — right kind, you know, of pitchina into him, eh? That was a d----d good fellow? Wouldn't I take a chaw? No? Was it possible I never chawed? Well, suppose we liquored then? Oh, curse it now — that was piling on the agony altogether too loud — neither chaw nor drink? That came of being in the Tribune office. Damn such isms, he said. But when he found that I was a willing and delighted listener to his stories of Tennessee, he se
field open here for Northern intelligence and Northern industry. Vi. Richmond. Richmond Christian advertisements a sign of the times the slave auction room the auctioneer a boy sold been examining her how niggers has riz Jones and Slater a mother on the Block a young Spartan maiden a curse on Virginia, Richmond, May 24.--Charleston excepted, and also, perhaps, Montgomery in Alabama, Romehilled Richmond is the most charming in situation or in outside aspect, of alt was new, clean and looked very tidy. The next Article disposed of was a young man, of similar complexion, twenty years old, muscular, with an energetic and intelligent expression. One thousand dollars was the first bid made. He was sold to Jones & Slater, who are forwarding agents, I was told, of animated merchandise to New Orleans. I hunted up their office after I left the auction-room. It was shut. It is situated in the congenial neighborhood of a cluster of disreputable houses.
by Mr. Leggett, who was one of them), in which he earnestly urged the conviction of the Topeka Free-State officers for high treason, but uttered not a syllable about the murderers of Barber and other Northern martyrs. This jury was packed by Sheriff Jones--thirteen pro-slavery to three Free-State men. The jury became a caucus, the pro-slavery members making abusive speeches against all the Free-State leaders as Massachusetts paupers; and then found indictments against several prominent citizenrms to receive him, and gave him the fat berth of a purser in the navy — a life-long office. Since the above was in type, Clark has been found dead on the prairie! He met his fate in returning to Lecompton to close up his business there. Jones — faithful sheriff — whose recent presence, when the war raged, was indicated by sacked villages or desolated farms, has been recently rewarded still further for his services in Kansas by the Marshalship of Arrizonia Territory. Clarkson, notor<
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
supposed the Lieutenant-General was coming. But lo! as they drew nearer, we recognized the features of Colonel Mike Walsh (erst a sergeant of cavalry), who, with an admirable Irish impudence, was acknowledging the shouts of the crowd that mistook him for Grant! Appomattox Court house We continued our ride. This country, from Gravelly Run up, is no longer the flat sand of Petersburg, but like Culpeper, undulating, with quartz and sandstone, and a red soil. About five we halted at Mrs. Jones's, a little east of Deep Creek, and prepared to go supperless to bed on the floor or on the grass, for our waggons were hopelessly in the rear. General Humphreys was across the Run, whither General Meade went, and came back with him at dusk. The General was very sick; he had been poorly since Friday night, and now was seized with a chill, followed by a violent fever, which excited him greatly, though it did not impair the clearness of his head. Good Humphreys got us something to eat and
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Heroism of the Third Iowa regiment at the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. (search)
Heroism of the Third Iowa regiment at the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. Major Jones, the correspondent of the West-Union Pioneer, writes to that paper a graphic account of that portion of the great fight at Pittsburgh Landing in which he participated. He says the Third formed in line at the Landing without orders, in just fifteen minutes from the firing of the first gun, and soon were off on the double-quick for the fight. Coming up within sixty rods of the enemy, they opened fire, but the distance was too great for execution, and the enemy being in heavy force, they fell back to a less exposed position, behind a rail-fence, where they awaited the coming of the rebels. The force opposed to them was the Pensacola brigade, the flower of Beauregard's army. As was expected, this large body charged upon the Third, and of this charge we will let the Major's graphic pen relate: But we were beginning to get sleepy and wishing for a change of programme, when we discovered the
at Manassas in July, he brought four brigades with four batteries and two in reserve. Beauregard had eight brigades with thirty-four guns, which, under orders of July 20th, he distributed for the action as follows: Six pieces to Ewell, eight to Jones, eight to Longstreet, and twelve to Cocke. The Washington Artillery at this time had four 12-pound howitzers, four 6-pounders, and three rifles, distributed among the different batteries. Twenty-eight pieces captured in the battle added to the es, with Pendleton's Artillery, thirty-six pieces, and the Washington Artillery in reserve. In July, 1862, the batteries were distributed as follows: Longstreet's Division:6 brigades,8 batteries A. P.Hill's Division:6 brigades,9 batteries Jones' Division:2 brigades,3 batteries D. H. Hill's Division:6 brigades,7 batteries Anderson's Division:3 brigades,6 batteries McLaws' Division:4 brigades,4 batteries This gave thirty-seven batteries to twenty-seven brigades, with Pendleton's F
tia company in Louisiana hopefully drilling in front of its armory as the war began. In many sections, the notions of the hastily organized companies in regard to military discipline and etiquette were crude in the extreme. A certain Virginia regiment, for the first time in its service, held a dress-parade. At the stage of the ceremony when the first-sergeants of the respective companies announce the result of the evening roll-call, one reported thus: All present in the Rifles, except Captain Jones, who is not feeling well this evening, but hopes to be feeling better to-morrow. Of like tenor was the response of a militia field-officer in the late autumn of 1861, when challenged by a sentry who demanded: Who comes there? We kem from over the river, gwine the grand rounds, was the response of him who presumptuously sported the insignia of a colonel. From such raw material was developed the magnificent Confederate army which supplied the matchless infantry of Lee. the lower grades
urt House this morning . . . and whereas, we have hitherto draggled along in pantaloons that we could put on a dozen ways by as many holes, have worn coats that afforded no protection to anything but the insects congregated in the seams of the same, have had shirts that—shirts that—that—at any rate we have had shirts-but now do fare forth prankt in all manner of gorgeous array, such as gray jackets with fillimagree on the sleeves of 'em, and hussar-breeches, and cavalry-boots, and O shade of Jones of Georgia! with spurs to boot and clean white collars to neck: and whereas, we have been accustomed to think a mud-hole a luxury in the way of beds, and have been wont to beg Heaven as its greatest boon to man, not to let the cavalry ride over us without waking us up to see 'em do it—but now do sleep between white sheets without fear of aught but losing our senses from sleeping so intensely: and whereas, finally, all these things are contrary to the ordinary course of nature and are not k
orders for the movement of my brigade. . . . Upon arriving there (McLean's Ford), I found General Jones had returned to the intrenchments with his brigade, and I was informed by him that General Bd it was shown to me a very little after twelve o'clock. . . . Chisholm, who carried the note to Jones, in which was contained the order I received, passed me at McLean's Ford going on to Jones aboutJones about, or a little after, eleven o'clock. If I had not received the order until 2 P. M., it would have been impossible for me to get on the field at the time I reached it, about 3:30 P. M. Colonel Chisholers. I also informed him of the condition in which I had found Colonel Gardner, and also of Colonel Jones being in the neighborhood badly wounded, requesting him to have a surgeon sent to their relif the wounded. I found a hospital on the Sudley road, back of the field of battle, at which Colonel Jones, of the Fourth Alabama, had been, which was in charge of a surgeon of a Rhode Island regimen
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