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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
, if no relief be given, Sayed bin Majid and Mohammed bin Gharib advance a few dozen cloths to him, which, with miserly economy, may suffice to purchase food for a month. And then? Ah! then the prospect will be blank indeed! However, Thy will be done. Elijah was fed by a raven; a mere dove brought hope to Noah; unto the hungering Christ, angels ministered. To God, the All-bountiful, all things are possible! To keep his mind from brooding over the hopeless prospect, he turns to his Journal, occupies himself with writing down at large, and with method, the brief jottings of his lengthy journeys, that nothing may be obscure of his history in the African wilds to those who may hereafter act as the executors and administrators of his literary estate. When fatigued by his constrained position on the clay floor in that east-facing verandah, he would lift his heavy Journal from his lap, and, with hand to chin, sit for hours in his brooding moods, thinking, ever thinking — mind ever
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XII: the Black regiment (search)
ducted them to freedom] who is living in Beaufort as a sort of nurse and general care take . . . . All sorts of unexpected people turn up here. . . . My regiment has now 630 and they come in tolerably fast. They are easy to discipline and drill, and do as well as any regiment of equal date,—as well as the 51st. I enjoy it all very much and have never for a moment regretted my promotion: though, without my two months in that regiment, it would have been almost impossible. In his War Journal, Colonel Higginson noted:— Just now a soldier was here, defending himself against a Captain's complaint and said indignantly, I ain't got colored-man principles, I's got white-gentleman principles. . . . I am not sure if it was one of our men who when asked insultingly, What are you, anyhow? answered When God made me, I was n't much, but I's a man now. . . . Their buoyant spirits are proof against everything . . . . Their little sorrows are usually like those of children— once make <
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
heard me, and the large room was crammed. The last two verses — not the bestwere applauded.... This was, I suppose, the greatest public honor of my life. I record it for my grandchildren. The November pages of the Journal are blank, but on that for November 21 is pasted a significant note. It is from the secretary of the National Sailors' Fair, and conveys the thanks of the Board of Managers to Mrs. Howe for her great industry and labor in editing the Boatswain's Whistle. Neither Journal nor Reminiscences has one word to say about fair or paper; yet both were notable. The great war-time fairs were far more than a device for raising money. They were festivals of patriotism; people bought and sold with a kind of sacred ardor. This fair was Boston's contribution toward the National Sailors' Home. It was held in the Boston Theatre, which for a week was transformed into a wonderful hive of varicolored bees, all workers, all humming and hurrying. The Boatswain's Whistle was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
talk released me from prison on parole on the same terms that I had accorded to his medical officers. The fact of the release of the Federal surgeons at Winchester in May, 1862, was noticed by the Confederate States Medical and Surgical Journal and by the different newspapers of that period. Soon after the release of these Federal surgeons, and I believe in consequence of their parole, a number of Confederate surgeons, then in Northern prisons, were sent home. From the Confederate War Journal of General Marcus J. Wright, Lexington, Ky., and New York, 1893-5, Vol. 2, p. 124, I glean the following as worthy of mention relating to the operations at that time as reported by Lieutenant-General T. J. Jackson from headquarters Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, April 10, 1863, to Brigadier-General R. H. Chilton, Acting Adjutant-General and Inspector-General, Headquarters Department of North Virginia: The public property captured in this expedition (1862) at Front Royal, Win
ald the Times of America, might as well, so far as that object is concerned, have been sunk in the Atlantic. All the libidinous entertainments from the days of Helen Jewett, with which for twenty-five years he has debauched society, until the moral stench of New York rises to Heaven like the foul clouds that drew down avenging fires upon Sodom, all these have failed to secure him the coveted reward of his prostitution. The Devil has swindled him even worse than he has swindled the public. The Herald is not the original, vigorous, dominant journal of New York. That Journal is the Tribune. That press is the incarnation of Puritan ideas, habits, philosophy, fanaticism, sensuality, selfishness and cruelty, whilst the Herald is but a miserable imitation. Even Brigadier-General Webb is more respectable in the eyes of the South now than James Gordon Bennett.-- Webb is only a fool. Let Greeley attend at once to Bennett, and stop the grimaces he is making at himself and his Lieutenant.