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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The following is the correspondence between the two rival candidates for the United States Senate: (search)
enate: Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Douglas. Chicago, Ill., July 24, 1858. Hon. S. A. Douglas-My Dear Sir: Will it be agreeable to you to make an arrangement for you and myself to divide time, and address the same audiences the present canvass? Mr. Judd, who will hand you this, is authorized to receive your answer ; and, if agreeable to you, to enter into the terms of such arrangement. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. Mr. Douglas to Mr. Lincoln. Chicago July 24, 1858. Hon. A. Lincoln--Dear Sir: Your note of this date, in which you inquire if it would be agreeable to me to make an arrangement to divide the time and address the same audiences during the present canvass, was handed me by Mr. Judd. Recent events have interposed difficulties in the way of such an arrangement. I went to Springfield last week for the purpose of conferring with the Democratic State Central Committee upon the mode of conducting the canvass, and with them, and under their advice, made a list
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
it has never been usual for any party, or any Convention, to nominate a candidate for United States Senator. Probably this was the first time that such a thing was ever done. The Black Republican Convention had not been called for that purpose, but to nominate a State ticket, and every man was surprised and many disgusted when Lincoln was nominated. Archie Williams thought he was entitled to it, Browning knew that he deserved it, Wentworth was certain that he would get it, Peck had hopes, Judd felt sure that, he was the man, and Palmer had claims and had made arrangements to secure it ; but to their utter amazement, Lincoln was nominated by the Convention, and not only that, but he received the nomination unanimously, by a resolution declaring that Abraham Lincoln was the first, last, and only choice of the Republican party. How did this occur? Why, because they could not get Lincoln's friends to make another bargain with rogues, unless the whole party would come up as one man an
o were entitled to be received. In both houses of Congress there were many of the most distinguished men of the nation. In the Senate Hamlin, Sumner, Conkling, Fenton, Fessenden, Frelinghuysen, Booth, McDougall, Simon Cameron, Chandler, Howard, Kellogg, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Wilson, Boutwell, Bayard, Morton, Williams of Oregon, Yates, Trumbull, and others, made it one of the ablest bodies that ever convened in any country. In the House there were Washburn, Logan, Cullom, Judd, Arnold, Singleton, Wentworth, Henderson, Farnsworth, Cook, Sherman, Schenck, Garfield, Grow, Shellabarger, Bingham, Archer, Thaddeus Stevens, Clymer, Williams, Colfax,Voorhees,Davis,Banks,Butler,WheelerWood, Slocum, Brooks, Frye, Blaine, Hale, Boutwell, Allison, Wilson of Iowa, and a score of others who were leaders of men and statesmen in every sense of the word. Before the Christmas holidays the breach between the President and Congress had widened so seriously that it was evident that
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
e, and immediately confronted a galaxy of as able men as were ever in that body. His first duty was to solve a most difficult problem in assigning the chairmanships of the committees, with such men to choose from as Logan, Garfield, Banks, Schenck, Dawes, Allison, Windom, Holman, Brooks of New York, Williams, Orth, Myers, O'Neil, Shellabarger, Wilson of Indiana, Wilson of Iowa, Butler, Lochridge, Bingham, Stoughton, Paine, Wheeler of New York, Ingersoll, Cook, Cullom, Farnsworth, Frye, Hale, Judd, and a legion too numerous to mention. Mr. Blaine was then young and vigorous, and probably the most promising statesman of the nation. His administration of the speakership was, without doubt, the most brilliant in the history of Congress, spanning the most important epoch of the nation. There were then, perhaps, more critical occasions when the great skill, knowledge, and quick perception of the speaker were necessary to avoid serious trouble than during any other period. Mr. Blaine was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
adelphia, where I met the detective, Pinkerton, who was registered under an assumed name, and arranged with him to bring Mr. Judd, Mr. Lincoln's intimate friend, to his room, in season to arrange for the journey to Washington that night. One of our sub-detectives made three efforts to communicate with Mr. Judd while passing through the streets in the procession, and was three times arrested and carried out of the crowd by the police. The fourth time he succeeded, and brought Mr. Judd to the roMr. Judd to the room at the hotel, where he met the detective-in-chief and myself. We lost no time in making known to him the facts which had come to our knowledge in reference to the conspiracy, and I most earnestly advised that Mr. Lincoln should go to Washington privately that night in our sleeping-car. Mr. Judd fully entered into the plan, and said he would urge Mr. Lincoln to adopt it. On his and Pinkerton's communicating with Mr. Lincoln after the services of the evening were over, he answered that he had
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 1: Introduction.—Dr. Wayland's arguments on the justifiableness of war briefly examined (search)
fathers were not the less mindful of their duty to their God, because they also faithfully served their country. If we are called upon to excel them in works of charity, of benevolence, and of Christian virtue, let it not be said of us that we have forgotten the virtue of patriotism. For further discussion of this subject the reader is referred to Lieber's Political Ethics, Part II., book VII. chap. 3; Paley's Moral and Political Philosophy; Legare's Report of June 13, 1838, in the House of Representatives; Mackintosh's History of the Revolution of 1688, chap. x.; Bynkershock; Vatel; Puffendorf; Clausewitz; and most other writers on international law and the laws of war. Dr. Wayland's view of the question is advocated with much zeal by Dymond in his Inquiry into the Accordancy of War with the Principles of Christianity; Jay's Peace and War; Judd's Sermon on Peace and War; Peabody's Address, &c.; Coue's Tract on What is the Use of the Navy? Sumner's True Grandeur of Nations.
f the thousands who desired to call on him last night, he declined giving a reception. The final council was held at 8 o'clock. Mr. Lincoln did not want to yield, and Col. Sumner actually cried with indignation; but Mrs. Lincoln, seconded by Mr. Judd and Mr. Lincoln's original informant, insisted upon it, and at 9 o'clock Mr. Lincoln left on a special train. He wore a Scotch plaid cap and a very long military cloak, so that he was entirely unrecognizable. Accompanied by Superintendent Lewis and one friend, he started, while all the town, with the exception of Mrs. Lincoln, Col. Sumner, Mr. Judd, and two reporters, who were sworn to secrecy, supposed him to be asleep. The telegraph wires were put beyond reach of any one who might desire to use them. At one o'clock the fact was whispered from one to another, and it soon became the theme of the most excited conversation. Many thought it a very injudicious move, while others regarded it as a stroke of great merit. The feeli
tel in Philadelphia, where I met the detective, who was registered under an assumed name, and arranged with him to bring Mr. Judd, Mr. Lincoln's intimate friend, to my room in season to arrange the journey to Washington that night. One of our sub-detectives made three efforts to communicate with Mr. Judd while passing through the streets in the procession, and was three times arrested and carried out of the crowd by the police. The fourth time he succeeded, and brought Mr. Judd to my room, whMr. Judd to my room, where he met the detective-in-chief and myself. We lost no time in making known to him all the facts which had come to our knowledge in reference to the conspiracy; and I most earnestly advised that Mr. Lincoln should go to Washington privately that night in the sleeping-car. Mr. Judd fully entered into the plan, and said he would urge Mr. Lincoln to adopt it. On his communicating with Mr. Lincoln, after the services of the evening were over, he answered that he had engaged to go to Harrisburg a
d and wounded, being one-third of the regiment engaged; three companies having been on special service. It lost, in this assault, as large a proportion as any other regiment, and established its reputation for cool and steady bravery. The brave and intrepid Colonel Bartlett was unfortunately shot through the wrist and heel early in the engagement, while leading the regiment to the assault on horseback. He had previously lost a leg in Virginia. Lieutenant-Colonel Sumner was wounded. Lieutenants Judd and Deming were killed while gallantly cheering on their men. Eleven of the eighteen officers with the regiment were wounded. The command of the regiment devolved on Major Plunkett, after the wounding of his superior officers, and continued under his command during the remainder of its term of service,—a command which he held with great credit to himself, and honor to the regiment. On the 14th of June, it made, with the rest of Auger's division, a feigned assault upon the rebel work
bloodhounds, reached a stream, down which he floated past the rebel pickets, till he reached a point guarded by the Union army, where he landed, a free man. A copy of his narrative will be given you for presentation with this interesting relic. The straw boat, here spoken of, attracted much attention at the State House; and the wonder was, how so frail a bark could float a man from slavery to freedom. The narrative of Jack Flowers was furnished the Governor by a gentleman by the name of Judd, and tells a terrible tale of the sufferings and wrongs of this poor man. It is too long to quote entire. He was a slave in South Carolina, and escaped by means of his straw boat through the rebel pickets, and landed safely at Hilton Head. Jack says that he made several attempts to pass the rebel picket line, but failed. We now quote from his narrative:— So, when I found it was no use to get over that way, I concluded to try another. Uncle lent me his axe and knife, and I cut a lot
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