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family, and, proceeding to the house of another slaveholder, gave deliverance to five more slaves. The other party, under Kagi, called at several houses in search of slaves, but found none until they reached the residence of David Cruse, who, learnio general and so hearty that they soon left, never to return. Brown was joined, soon after this Battle of the spurs, by Kagi, with forty mounted men from Topeka, of whom seventeen escorted him safely to Nebraska City. He there crossed the MississChief were to be separate, and in all cases to be held by different persons. John Brown was chosen Commander-in-Chief; J. H. Kagi, Secretary of War; Owen Brown (son of John), Treasurer; Richard Realf, Secretary of State. Brown returned to the Stairginians, who lined either bank, until two of them were dead, and a third mortally wounded, when the fourth surrendered. Kagi, Brown's Secretary of War, was one of the killed. William H. Leeman, one of Brown's captains, being pursued by scores, pl
James A., Alleghany Summit, 527. Jones, Lieut., evacuates Harper's Ferry, 642. Jones, sheriff Samuel J., a Border Ruffian, 242; threatens to bombard Lawrence, 244. Jordan, Col., (Rebel,) boasts of having received details of our plan of battle before Bull Run, 550. Joseph, the, captured by the Savannah, 598. Journal of the Times, The, 115. Judah, the, destroyed at Pensacola, 601-2. Julian, George W., of Ind., nominated for Vice-President by the Free-Soilers, 224. K. Kagi, J. H., a liberator of slaves, 286; rejoins Brown at Topeka, 287; is Brown's Secretary of War, 288; killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Kanawha: see West Virginia. Kane, Judge John I., letter to from Polk, 169; his decision in the case of Euphemia Williams, 216. Kane, George P., Marshal of the Baltimore Police, 421; puts a stop to the riot at Baltimore, 464; his dispatch to Bradley T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 t
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
eady in time. Please keep very quiet about the matter. Yours, &c., John Brown. I made all my arrangements for starting at the time appointed. Parsons, Realf, and Hinton could not get ready. I left them at Lawrence, and started in a carriage for Topeka. Stopped at the hotel over night, and left early the next morning for Mrs. Sheridan's, to meet Captain Brown. Staid a day and a half at Mrs. Sheridan's — then lift for Topeka, at which place we were joined by Stephens, Moffitt, and Kagi. Left Topeka for Nebraska City, and camped at night on the prairie north-east of Topeka. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter. It was the intention of the party to go to Ashtabula County, Ohio Next morning I was sent back to Lawrence to get a draft of eighty dollars cashed, and to get Parsons, Realf, and Hinton to go back with me. I got the draft cashed. Captain Brown had given me orders to take boat to St. Joseph, Mo.,
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: some shadows before. (search)
e thus continues: A talk with John Brown and Kagi. On Sunday I held a very interesting conversters of our men of anti-slavery reputations. Kagi, at the same time, gave me to understand that tin had, in the interval, with the assistance of Kagi, Tidd, Stephens, Leeman, and another member of r the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The othwn documents, if they contained but six lines. Kagi interposed, and made some remarks, which calmede is such as to deserve the blessing of God. Kagi unfolds the great plan. After dinner, Kagi hKagi had some conversation with the Captain apart. He then asked me if I would walk down to the Marais-de and removing them to Canada. On the contrary, Kagi clearly stated, in answer to my inquiries, that forage, as also arms, horses, and ammunition. Kagi said one of the reasons that induced him to go n them pell-mell, as well as all their slaves. Kagi said John Brown anticipated that by a system of[6 more...]
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, John Brown in Southern Kansas. (search)
he land, and Synder agreed to sell. But though a brave, he was not specially an upright man, and, soon after making a bargain with John Brown, having a better offer, he broke the contract. The Captain had, in the interval, with the assistance of Kagi, Tidd, Stephens, Leeman, and another member of his company, prepared a very strong fortification, where they could have successfully resisted a large force. In my journey through the Southern border counties, I found that a general feeling of conthat a general feeling of confidence prevailed among our friends, because John Brown was near. Over the border the Missourians were remarkably quiet from June until October, from the belief that the old hero was in their vicinity. By the bad faith of Synder the farm was abandoned, and Captain Brown and Kagi came to Mr. Adair's, where I met them. The others were living in Linn and Anderson Counties. I called at the house about ten in the morning, and remained until past three in the afternoon.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Kagi unfolds the great plan. (search)
Kagi unfolds the great plan. After dinner, Kagi had some conversation with the Captain apart. He then asked me if I woKagi had some conversation with the Captain apart. He then asked me if I would walk down to the Marais-des-Cygnes, as he was going to fish. I acquiesced, and we started. About half way to the river we stopped, and sat on a fence. Kagi asked me what I supposed was the plan of Captain Brown? My answer was, that I thoughy of slaves, and removing them to Canada. On the contrary, Kagi clearly stated, in answer to my inquiries, that the design refuge for the slave, and a defence against the oppressor. Kagi spoke of having marked out a chain of counties extending co as possible, in order to retreat when that was advisable. Kagi, however, expected to retreat southward, not in the contrarbsistence by forage, as also arms, horses, and ammunition. Kagi said one of the reasons that induced him to go into the entorth was upon them pell-mell, as well as all their slaves. Kagi said John Brown anticipated that by a system of forbearance
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: Fleshing the sword. (search)
f men were inside, turned about and fled — fired at, as they ran, by Kagi, who had been lying in another bed. During this period Captain Br to the cabin of John Brown, on the Little Sugar Creek. Stevens and Kagi were its only occupants. As soon as it was known that this posse waquarter of a mile, about one hundred and twenty strong. Stevens and Kagi went out to meet the officer, who had ridden up within a few rods ofhe wanted. He replied, To disarm them and demolish their fort. Kagi told him to produce his authority. You are an illegal body, and ihame, and have to leave the country. We can't help that, retorted Kagi; it is no business of ours; there is no use having any nonsense abou county. To the devil with the high Sheriff of Lynn County! said Kagi. Hand over that gun. John Brown returned from Ossawatomie as sooith one hundred and fifty men, officered by John Brown's followers,--Kagi, among others, and Anderson, and rescued his friend whom the ruffian
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
asion. Of these two parties of liberators John Brown and Kagi were the Captains. The old man's force consisted of twelve men; Kagi's company of eight only. The slaves were to have been removed to Texas on the following day. Captain Brown went to take property to the amount thus due to the negroes. Kagi went on the southern side of the Little Osage, and called afadder, when you's free? These incidents were related by Kagi. These liberated slaves constituted four families: one two or three weeks. A fight or two. Captain Brown and Kagi returned to their fortified position — known as Bain's FortLynn County. During the absence of Montgomery and Brown, Kagi, who had been left in command, had two or three fights withmpelled them to leave the town. The overland journey. Kagi, in the mean time, arrived at Topeka from the South, and foChicago, he sent his men in different directions, retaining Kagi and Stevens with him. A gentleman who conversed with him in
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: assembling to conspire. (search)
ut as they were directed by Captain Brown or J. H. Kagi, I do not know the parties to whom they were Convention, I think, was called to order by J. H. Kagi. Its object was then stated, which was to ccolored minister, was elected President, and J. H. Kagi, Secretary. The next business was to form a was unanimously elected Commander-in-Chief, J. H. Kagi, Secretary of War, and Richard Realf, Secretst of our party took the boat to Cleveland — J. H. Kagi, Richard Realf, William H. Leeman, Richard Rhowever, started in a day or two for the East. Kagi, I think, went to some other town in Canada to mble stand as read. Carried. On motion of Mr. Kagi, the Constitution, as a whole, was then unani by acclamation. Mr. Realf nominated J. II. Kagi for Secretary of War, who was elected in the saslin, Isaac Holley, James Smith. Signed, J. H. Kagi, Secretary of the Convention. Memorandumnder-in-Chief-John Brown. Secretary of War--J. H. Kagi. Members of Congress-Alfred 31. Ellsworth, [3 more...]
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Saturday, may 8, 1858-- (search)
a call of John Brown and others, and was called to order by Mr. Jackson, on whose motion Mr. Wm. C. Monroe was chosen President; when, on motion of Mr. Brown, Mr. J. H. Kagi was elected Secretary. On motion of Mr. Delany, Mr.Brown then proceeded to state the object of the Convention at length, and then to explain the general fes, with the schedule, were then adopted in the same manner. It was then moved by Mr. Delany that the title and preamble stand as read. Carried. On motion of Mr. Kagi, the Constitution, as a whole, was then unanimously adopted. Mr. Whipple nominated John Brown for Commander-in-Chief, who was, on the seconding of Delany, elee, was then unanimously adopted. Mr. Whipple nominated John Brown for Commander-in-Chief, who was, on the seconding of Delany, elected by acclamation. Mr. Realf nominated J. II. Kagi for Secretary of War, who was elected in the same manner. On motion of Mr. Brown, the Convention adjourned to nine P. M. of Monday, the 10th.
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