Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kane or search for Kane in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
wounded and prisoners in our hands, and, to use Kane's own words, Hardly a dozen of the command escas quartered; then to Holliday street, where Marshal Kane had his police and cannon. Everywhere the the way there was a riotous demonstration. Marshal Kane was there with 120 policemen, and while he young men down South and Lombard streets. Marshal Kane came to their protection. They appealed tooops at his law office, on St. Paul street. Marshal Kane sent word to him that the troops were aboutthe disturbance would be at that place, and Marshal Kane was already there and policemen were cominggry demonstration, and only the presence of Marshal Kane with a police force prevented further bloodts regiment. Colonel Jones, in a letter to Marshal Kane, thanked him for the Christian conduct of tuld exceed the courage and skill with which Marshal Kane met the emergency with the small force undewas some sickness, due to want of food, and Marshal Kane sent wagon loads of bread and meat to them.[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland Confederates. (search)
iment to support the Marylanders, was killed, almost in touch with right file of the Maryland Regiment. This regiment did the fighting, losing some of its best officers and men. Major Goldsborough wrote: The commander of the Bucktails, Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, with several of his officers and many of the men were wounded and prisoners in our hands, and, to use Kane's own words, Hardly a dozen of the command escaped. General Ewell issued an order complimenting the First Maryland and ColoneKane's own words, Hardly a dozen of the command escaped. General Ewell issued an order complimenting the First Maryland and Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, and authorized a captured bucktail to be appended to the color staff. Ashby's last words were: Charge men; for God's sake charge! Waving his sword, a bullet pierced his breast and he fell dead. When killed he was afoot, As a member of Jackson's Foot Cavalry and in sound of the battle in which the beau sabreur Ashby fell, I was cognizant, somewhat, of attendant circumstances. My information was that Ashby went into the action afoot, and against the remonstrance of G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Virginia supplied Maryland with arms. (search)
of the car which carried the arms, enveloped in a cloud of steam and cinders, until, at the end of the journey I resembled more a miner than a soldier, so blackened and disfigured was I. But, notwithstanding my appearance, I met with a royal welcome from those gallant sons of old Maryland whom I afterwards learned to admire for their soldierly bearing in times that tried men's souls. I was escorted to the Institute, where the Maryland Line was quartered; then to Holliday street, where Marshal Kane had his police and cannon. Everywhere the colors of the Confederacy were displayed—upon the houses and the people—as if all Baltimore was of one mind, and that was with the South; I was urged to tell the Virginia authorities to move the army from Harpers Ferry to Baltimore. Before leaving for Harpers Ferry that evening, I was told that John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, desired to talk to me. I went to his office, where I met him and the chief officers of the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
All the way there was a riotous demonstration. Marshal Kane was there with 120 policemen, and while he succed the young men down South and Lombard streets. Marshal Kane came to their protection. They appealed to him rn troops at his law office, on St. Paul street. Marshal Kane sent word to him that the troops were about to athat the disturbance would be at that place, and Marshal Kane was already there and policemen were coming in beached a point between Charles and Light streets Marshal Kane, by a bold and skillful movement, interposed a san angry demonstration, and only the presence of Marshal Kane with a police force prevented further bloodshed.husetts regiment. Colonel Jones, in a letter to Marshal Kane, thanked him for the Christian conduct of the aung could exceed the courage and skill with which Marshal Kane met the emergency with the small force under hishere was some sickness, due to want of food, and Marshal Kane sent wagon loads of bread and meat to them. Aft