Your search returned 17 results in 10 document sections:

Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 45: exchange of prisoners and Andersonville. (search)
al and Confederate prisons. A correspondent of the New York Tribune adduces the logic of facts, in a very conclusive manner, in the following communication: The Elmira Gazette is authority for the following: In the four months of February, March, April, and May, 1865, out of 5,027 prisoners confined there, 1,311 died, showing a death — rate per month of 61 per cent., against less than three per cent. at Andersonville, or more than double at Elmira to that at Andersonville. Again, Mr. Keiley, in his journal of September, 1864, when confined there, kept a record of deaths for that month, and states them to be 386 out of 9,500 then there, or at a rate of four per cent. against three per cent. in Andersonville. It must also be taken into consideration that in the South our armies formed a barrier against the introduction of both food and medicine, while in our case there was abundance of everything. J. L. T. The answer of the Tribune is a curiosity of lame, impotent evas
iments discharged their duty nobly, and deserve special mention by their Colonels, Capts. Clark, Robinson, and Huntington served their guns with great credit, and deserve particular notice. To the members of your staff, Lieut.-Col. Shriber, Capt. Keiley and Capt. Keogh, I am under many, very many obligations, for the prompt, efficient, and officer-like manner in which they discharged the duties assigned them. The two latter were in the field through the hottest of the engagement, exposed to the enemy's fire from first to last. Capt. Keiley received a severe wound in the face, while urging forward the men, and was carried off the field. For a list of the casualties of the engagement, I respectfully refer you to the reports of the several regiments, accompanying this paper. The loss of the enemy must have been very heavy. The grape and canister from our batteries and the fire of our musketry mowed them down like grass before a well-served scythe, and the fact of their heavy f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ed. But whether called rebel or not, the Confederate soldier has nothing to be ashamed of. Can the soldiers of the Federal armies read this record and say the same? Yes, our comrades, let them call us rebels, if they will; we are proud of the title, and with good reason. More than a hundred years ago, when, as Pitt said, even the chimney-sweeps in London streets talked boastingly of their subjects in America,Rebel was the uniform title of those despised subjects (and as our own eloquent Keiley once said): This sneer was the substitute for argument, which Camden and Chatham met in the Lords, and Burke and Barre in the Commons, as their eloquent voices were raised for justice to the Americans of the last century. Disperse Rebels was the opening gun at Lexington. Rebels was the sneer of General Gage addressed to the brave lads of Boston Commons. It was the title by which Dunmore attempted to stigmatize the Burgesses of Virginia, and Sir Henry Clinton passionately denounced the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
ed. But whether called rebel or not, the Confederate soldier has nothing to be ashamed of. Can the soldiers of the Federal armies read this record and say the same? Yes, our comrades, let them call us rebels, if they will; we are proud of the title, and with good reason. More than a hundred years ago, when, as Pitt said, even the chimney-sweeps in London streets talked boastingly of their subjects in America,Rebel was the uniform title of those despised subjects (and as our own eloquent Keiley once said): This sneer was the substitute for argument, which Camden and Chatham met in the Lords, and Burke and Barre in the Commons, as their eloquent voices were raised for justice to the Americans of the last century. Disperse Rebels was the opening gun at Lexington. Rebels was the sneer of General Gage addressed to the brave lads of Boston Commons. It was the title by which Dunmore attempted to stigmatize the Burgesses of Virginia, and Sir Henry Clinton passionately denounced the
nah on Monday last, with 180 boxes of Sharpe's patent carbines, 1,800 in all, and 40,000 conical ball cartridges, for the State of Georgia. They came from Hartford, Connecticut, and were forwarded immediately to Milledgeville. Movements in Virginia. One of the largest meetings ever held in Petersburg, convened on Thursday night, in response to a call for a gathering of "all friends of the Federal Union." Resolutions of a conservative character were introduced by Messrs. Collier and Keiley, and voted down. The following, introduced by Hon. Roger A. Pryor, were adopted — a result not contemplated by the projectors of the movement.-- Blue cockades were numerous on the streets the next day: Whereas, The people of Virginia did originally ratify the Federal Constitution in their sovereign character, and to the exercise of their own independent will; and did thereby delegate certain enumerated powers to the Federal Government, for certain specific purposes, at the same time r
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource], List of officers of the 12th Virginia. (search)
muel Stevens, A. Q. Master; Benjamin Harrison, A. C. Subsistence. Company A--C E Waddill, Captain; James May, Jr, 1st Lieut.; E B Bain, 2d do.; T W Branch, 2d do. Company B--John Lyon, Captain; R R Bowden, 1st Lieut.; T P Pollard, 2d Lieut.; W G Lea, 2d do. Company C--T H Bonn, Captain; L L Marks, 1st Lt.; S J White, 2d Lt.; George Hawks, 2d do. Company D--J P Critz, Captain; W E Badger, 1st Lieut.; W L Penn, 2d do; R Turner, 2d do. Company E--R R Banks, Captain; A M Keiley, 1st Lieut.; J R Patterson, 2d do; N M Martin, 2d do. Company F--E M Field, Captain; H W Field, 1st Lieut.; E P Scott, Jr., 2d do; A W Ferguson, 2d do. Company G--J V Crawford, Captain; E W Branch, 1st Lieut.; Ed. Tyler, 2d do.; Robt Mayo, Jr., 2d do. Company H--T F Owen, Captain; W H Woodhouse, 1st Lieut.; Chas Beale, 2d do; Chas Deshields, 2d do. Company I--R W Jones, Captain; J R Manson, 1st Lieut.; -- Nicholson, 2d do.; -- Green, 2d do. Company K--J R Lewellen, C
greed to — ayes 51, noes 34. The bill was then put upon its passage and adopted — ayes 77, noes 21. On motion of Mr. Anderson, the Report of the committee of conference on the disagreeing vote of the two Houses on the bill to reorganize the militia was taken up, and after a lengthy discussion agreed to by the following vote — ayes 87, noes 19. On motion of Mr. Shackelford, the House bill returned from the Senate for the relief of indigent soldiers and sailors was taken up, and the House determined to insist upon the bill as passed. Mr. Shackelford was appointed to notify the Senate of the action of the House, and to ask a committee of conference on the disagreement between the two Houses. On motion of Mr. Keiley, the bill to increase the compensation of Clerks and Sheriffs for public services was taken up and passed. On motion of Mr. Anderson, the rules were suspended, and the House bill No. 52, to declare who shall be exempt from militia duty, was taken
uses to fill the office. The Senate then went into secret session. House of Delegates. The House met at 11 A. M. Not a quorum of members were present, and a call of the House being ordered, the doors were closed. Subsequently the call of the House was suspended, and a quorum appearing, business proceeded. The Speaker announced the committee of the House under the joint resolution concerning the change of guage of track of the Piedmont railroad--Messrs. Bouldin, Buford and Keiley. A large number of bills were taken up in their order on the calendar and advanced to a second reading. Mr. Hunter, of Berkeley, introduced a resolution inviting Colonel J. S. Mosby to a privileged seat in the House; and a committee being appointed, waited upon Colonel Mosby and conducted him to a seat beside the Speaker's chair. A recess of the House was taken, and the members and visitors were introduced to the guest of the House by the Speaker, and the Colonel was congratulated
with a copy of the contract. The resolution was agreed to and sent to the Senate. Mr. Buford offered a resolution that a special committee of seven be appointed to take into consideration what relief can be afforded Virginia soldiers by the employment of negroes as cooks, etc.; also, to inquire into the expediency of enlisting and arming of the black population, both free and slave, and their employment in such service as prudence may dictate. The resolution was agreed to. Mr. Keiley, of Petersburg, moved, by resolution, that the House provide by law for the exemption in the second-class militia of Petersburg of all over fifty years of age, the same as in the Richmond second-class militia. Agreed to. The Speaker laid before the House a communication from the Governor re-commending additional legislation on the subject of the county quotas for slaves to work on fortifications and other Government works, which was read and referred. The remainder of the sessio
Delegates. The House met 11 A. M. The bill amendatory of the act creating a commercial agency for the State of Virginia for the purchase and distribution of cotton, cotton cloth and cotton cards, and prescribing the duties and obligations of the agent thereof, was discussed at great length, amended and passed. The bill to afford relief, by an appropriation of one million of dollars, to soldiers' families located within the lines of the enemy, was taken up as the order of the day at 1 o'clock; and the discussion thereupon was continued to a late hour. The bill was advanced to its engrossment. The Speaker announced the special committee on the resolution of Mr. Buford in relation to the employment of slaves in the army in the capacity of cooks, laborers, etc., subject to the discretion of the commander-in-chief: Messrs. Buford, Shackleford, Haymond of Marion, Cummings, Keiley, Ambers and Linkous. Pending the discussion of the relief bill, the House adjourned.