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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 146 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
e loss: k, 2; w, 4 = 6. Second Brigade, Col. Nicholas Perezel: 10th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William E. Small; 26th Mo., Col. George B. Boomer. Artillery: 11th Ohio Battery, Capt. Frank C. Sands. Loss: k, 1. Third division, Brig.-Gen. John M. Palmer. First Brigade, Col. James R. Slack: 34th Ind., Col. Townsend Ryan; 47th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Milton S. Robinson. Second Brigade, Col. Graham N. Fitch: 43d Ind., Col. William E. McLean; 46th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Newton G. Scott. Cavalry: 7th Ill., Col. Wm. P. Kellogg. Loss: w, 1; m, 2 = 3. Artillery: G, 1st Mo., Capt. Henry Hescock. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. E. A. Paine. First Brigade, Col. James D. Morgan: 10th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John Tillson; 16th Ill., Col. Robert F. Smith. Brigade loss: k, 1; , 1 1 2. Second Brigade, Col. Gilbert W. Cumming: 22d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Harrison E. Hart; 51st Ill., Lieut.-Col. Luther P. Bradley. Cavalry: H and I, 1st Ill., Major D. P. Jenkins. Sharp-shooters: 64th Ill., Major F. W. Matteson. Fifth division,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White League. (search)
al message to Congress, Jan. 13, 1875: It has been bitterly and persistently alleged that Kellogg was not elected. Whether he was or not is not altogether certain, nor is it any more certain ts chosen. The election was a gigantic fraud, and there are no reliable returns of its result. Kellogg obtained possession of the office, and in my opinion has more right to it than his competitor. s of McEnery proceeded to displace by force in some counties of the State the appointees of Governor Kellogg; and on April 13, in an effort of that kind, a butchery of citizens was committed at Colfaxch grew out of an attempt of white persons to drive the parish judge and sheriff, appointees of Kellogg, from office, and their attempted protection by colored persons, which led to some fighting in tle and flourishing town of Coushatta. Some of them were Republicans and officeholders under Kellogg. They were therefore doomed to death. Six of them were seized and carried away from their hom
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 35: the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
, but his brain has no conception of scale. In Louisiana, the Negroes count a clear, though not a large, majority of votes, and claim to have a clear majority of members in the Chamber. They are backed by Federal troops. Their nominee, William P. Kellogg, is recognised by President Grant as Governor of Louisiana. Yet see the train in which we are going towards New Orleans! By law, a Negro is the White's man's equal; by the railway company he is charged the White man's fare. Is he allowedies, a curl of scorn on his thin aristocratic lips; a Negro sit among our wives and sisters! Has he not the legal right? Such right as rules and articles can give him,yes; but he knows his place a good deal better than the scalawags. If Kellogg and his crew were gone, we should have no more trouble with the coloured folk. They know us; we know them. It was a crime to give them votes; but we could live well enough with coloured voters, if the Federal troops were called away. You
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
s six or seven weeks remained of Governor Warmoth's term, there was plenty of time to sift the lists before Louisiana should find herself without a legal governor and a regular government. McEnery was content to wait until the Chambers met; but Kellogg dared not face a chamber meeting under Warmoth's orders; and Kellogg's movements brought about the reign of anarchy. William Pitt Kellogg, a lawyer out of practice, came from Illinois to New Orleans in search of fortune. Hundreds of his neigKellogg's movements brought about the reign of anarchy. William Pitt Kellogg, a lawyer out of practice, came from Illinois to New Orleans in search of fortune. Hundreds of his neighbours do the same, exchanging the frosts of Lake Michigan for the sunshine on the Gulf. He brought to New Orleans a carpet-bag, a glozing tongue, and a supply of sentiment. John Brown was his hero, and in company with John Brown's soul, he marched and chorused till a Negro caucus ran him for the local Senate. Lank and smooth, with sanctimonious garb and speech, he won the Negro heart, and got Republicans in Washington to mark him as a man to carry out their plans. Kellogg was intriguing f
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. (search)
re void, Warmoth remained, as he contended, the legal Governor, bound to keep his seat and hold the Seal till his successor had been named. Nothing was done towards carrying out these wishes of the Senate, these conclusions of the President. Kellogg was afraid to face a second vote. Promises had been made to the Negroes which he could not keep. The Negro brain is dull, and offers must be made in very plain terms. Thousands of Negro votes had been obtained by a promise of forty acres of lf Negro votes had been obtained by a promise of forty acres of land and a stout mule for each vote. Thousands of Negroes were annoyed at the postponement of these lands and mules, and it was dangerous to tempt them in their angry mood. So Kellogg was allowed by President Grant to put off the new elections to a safer time. Two Senates and three Governors contended with each other for the mastery of New Orleans. No man could tell where his allegiance lay. The reign of anarchy was complete.
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 3: White reaction. (search)
ans recovers, Louisiana recovers. Now, under Kellogg and his reign of anarchy, New Orleans was banith Conservative Senators in New Orleans that Kellogg was not the lawful Governor of Louisiana. Bud Penn settled with the voters who had chosen Kellogg and Antoine. Might . . . but who could tell?ncock was a blessing compared to a ruler like Kellogg. Under a Federal soldier there would be no pg, as a stranger in their city, to retire. Kellogg shut himself in his apartments, with his Negr The crowd in Canal Street were not armed, as Kellogg and Billings knew. An hour later, Packard te with the purely local question as to whether Kellogg or McEnery had a true majority of votes. Lon in possession of the citizens. At midnight, Kellogg stole away from his apartments in the State He victory. The one thing certain. was, that Kellogg had not carried the State for Grant. Kelloggre. One chance, and only one, remained for Kellogg and his patrons: such an intervention of the [10 more...]
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
o represent all the great shades of opinion. Kellogg named this board, and in open violation of tservatives had a majority of twenty-nine; but Kellogg's illegal Returning Board has continued to sw Five cases referred. One hit is scored by Kellogg. If pretexts can be found for shutting out td vote until their cases have been heard; but Kellogg thinks that rules which govern free assemblieervative majority from indicting and deposing Kellogg, as Governor Warmoth was indicted and deposeds a quorum is a body open to arrangements. Kellogg believes that some of the voters may be bough With critics so unfriendly to disarm, it is Kellogg's policy to seek some safe and legal ground; th, culture, eloquence are on their side. In Kellogg's group there is hardly a man of name. Amonged dining-room into a legislative hall. By Kellogg's orders, planks are nailed across the doors cigars displayed. When everything is ready, Kellogg sends his scouts into the streets to bid Negr[12 more...]
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 6: invasion! (search)
the Negroes having left the room in order to seek advice from the party wire-pullers sitting in Kellogg's cabinet. When the five gentlemen come in, the White voting strength amounts to fifty-four voters of the city? Not yet. Sitting in his room, surrounded by officers, civil and military, Kellogg grows excited and alarmed, as news come in from the adjoining chamber. Spite of his drinking-b my orders, urges De Trobriand. General Emory has ordered me to follow the instructions of Governor Kellogg. I have to state to you in formal words, replies the Speaker, that this House, duly elStreet they find new quarters, and after a formal act of possession, they adjourn the House. Kellogg is little pleased with his victory. In place of mending matters by his violence he has made thpeaker, and as Speaker has adjourned the sittings to St. Louis Street. Looking back on events, Kellogg sees that he is beaten on every side, and weaker in strength than ever. Neither he nor his riv
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 7: banditti (search)
dy a remonstrance and appeal from Speaker Wiltz, who first telegraphs to him a brief account of the invasion: I have the honour to inform you that the House of Representatives of this State was organized to day by the election of myself as Speaker, fifty-eight members, two more than a quorum, voting, with a full House present. More than two hours after the organization, I was informed by the officer in command of the United States troops in this city that he had been requested by Governor Kellogg to remove certain members of the House from the State House, and that, under his orders, he was obliged to comply with the request. I protested against any interference of the United States with the organization or proceedings of the House; but notwithstanding this protest, the officer in command marched a company of soldiers upon the floor of the House, and by force removed thirteen members, who had been legally and constitutionally seated as such, and who, at time of such forcible r
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 8: the Conservatives. (search)
in Boston, Bryant in New York, are giving the highest intellectual sanction to the general fury. Evarts, the ablest lawyer in America, is denouncing Sheridan and De Trobriand, in terms not often applied by lawyers to the lowest tools of a despotic power. The curses showered on Kellogg have a bitterness unequalled since the war. Should President Grant back down, repudiating Sheridan and letting Kellogg go, where, in such. a reign of anarchy, will the legal government of the State reside? in Boston, Bryant in New York, are giving the highest intellectual sanction to the general fury. Evarts, the ablest lawyer in America, is denouncing Sheridan and De Trobriand, in terms not often applied by lawyers to the lowest tools of a despotic power. The curses showered on Kellogg have a bitterness unequalled since the war. Should President Grant back down, repudiating Sheridan and letting Kellogg go, where, in such. a reign of anarchy, will the legal government of the State reside?
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