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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
, across which were seen the Federal infantry and batteries. A terrible fire was now poured upon them, but without halting to reform the line, disintegrated and much reduced by the double quick through the woods, a charge was made upon a battery (Kern's) about three hundred yards distant (near Mitlock's house) supported by Seymour's brigade, the left brigade of McCall's division. The impetuosity of the charge broke the enemy's line and for a time the battery was in Kemper's possession, but theer on the right) became engaged within the wood with the pursuing enemy, and drove him back into the field. On the edge of this field Branch halted, where a projection of the wood placed him within range of the battery which Kemper had assaulted (Kern's), and opening fire upon it he succeeded in silencing it and driving off its cannoneers. Strange, emerging on the field about this time, made a gallant charge on the position, and, after a sharp affair with its supports, took the battery and hel
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
e fight without giving attention, and went into camp at Hundley's Corner, half a mile in rear of the enemy's position of contention. A. P. Hill put his force in severe battle and was repulsed. As D. H. Hill approached, he was called into the fray by the commanding general, then by the President. He sent Ripley's brigade and five batteries, which made the battle strong and hot along the line. The most determined efforts were against the enemy's right, where General McCall, reinforced by Kern's battery and Griffin's and Martindale's brigades (Morell's division), Edwards's battery, and the Third Regiment of Meade's brigade, beat off the repeated and formidable efforts of A. P. Hill, when he essayed a column against the crossing at Ellerson's Mill, which McCall reinforced by the Seventh Regiment of Meade's, Eastman's battery, and before night the Fourth Michigan, Twelfth New York, and Berdan's Sharp-shooters came in to reinforce the line and relieve regiments exhausted of ammunition
Light Artillery. Synonym.     Battery. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. Cooper's - B 1st Penn. Artillery First 2 19 21 Sands' -   11th Ohio Battery Seventeenth -- 20 20 Phillips' -   5th Mass. Battery Fifth 1 18 19 Weeden's - C 1st R. I. Artillery Fifth -- 19 19 Cowan's -   1st N. Y. Battery Sixth 2 16 18 Stevens' -   5th Maine Battery First 2 16 18 Ricketts' - F 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 17 18 Easton's - A 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Kern's - G 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Randolph's - E 1st R. I. Artillery Third -- 17 17 Pettit's - B 1st N. Y. Artillery Second -- 16 16 Bigelow's -   9th Mass. Battery Reserve Art'y 2 13 15 Bradbury's -   1st Maine Battery Nineteenth 2 13 15 Wood's - A 1st Ill. Artillery Fifteenth -- 15 15 The loss in the Eleventh Ohio Battery occurred almost entirely in one action, 19 of its men having been killed or mortally wounded at Iuka in a charge on the batt
m one shot more, and falls dead as Pickett's men surge up to the muzzles of his pieces. Of the noted batteries mentioned in the accompanying list of casualties, Kern, Woodruff, Burnham, Hazzard, DeHart, Dimmick, Rorty, Hazlitt, Leppien, McGilvery, Geary (of Knap's), Simonson, Erickson and Whitaker (of Bigelow's)--were killed ine in this list. 1st Rhode Island Cedar Creek 4 23 -- 27 Brown's B, 1st Rhode Island Gettysburg 7 19 2 28 Dillon's -- 6th Wisconsin Corinth 5 21 -- 26 Kern's G, Appears twice in this list. 1st Pennsylvania Manassas 3 23 8 34 Houghtaling's C, 1st Illinois Stone's River 5 20 -- 25 Woodruff's I, 1st United n's I, 5th United States Gettysburg 1 19 2 22 Nims's -- 2d Massachusetts Sabine X Roads 1 18 1 20 Tompkins's A, 1st Rhode Island Antietam 4 15 -- 19 Kern's G, 1st Pennsylvania Gaines's Mill 7 12 -- 19 Cooper's B, 1st Pennsylvania Seven Days 4 15 -- 19 McKnight's M, 5th United States Cedar Creek 2 17 4 23
A-- Served through the war. Easton's 1 16 17   21 21 38   First. June, ‘61 B-- Served through the war. Cooper's 2 19 21   17 17 38   First. June, ‘61 C--McCarthy's   2 2   12 12 14   Sixth. July, ‘61 D-- Served through the war. Munk's   11 11 1 18 19 30   Sixth. June, ‘61 E-- Served through the war. Miller's   2 2   21 21 23   Eighteenth. July, ‘61 F-- Served through the war. Ricketts's 1 17 18   13 13 31   First. July, ‘61 G-- Served through the war. Kern's 1 16 17   14 14 31   First. July, ‘61 H-- Served through the war. Brady's   1 1 1 18 19 20   Fourth, A. P. Sept., ‘64 I--Cameron's         2 2 2       Independent Batteries.                     Penn. Light Artillery--                   Sept., ‘61 A-- Served through the war. Schaffer's       1 16 17 17     Aug., ‘61 B-- Served through the war. Muehler's 2 8 10   25 25 35   Fourth, A. C. Nov.,
This line was formed perpendicularly to the New Market road, with Meade's brigade on the right, Seymour's on the left, and Reynolds's brigade, commanded by Col. S. G. Simmons, of the 5th Penn., in reserve; Randall's regular battery on the right, Kern's and Cooper's batteries opposite the centre, and Dietrich's and Kauerhem's batteries of the artillery reserve on the left-all in front of the infantry line. The country in Gen. McCall's front was an open field, intersected towards the right by t. Soon after this a most determined charge was made on Randall's battery by a full brigade, advancing in wedge-shape, without order, but in perfect recklessness. Somewhat similar charges had, I have stated, been previously made on Cooper's and Kern's batteries by single regiments, without success, they having recoiled before the storm of canister hurled against them. A like result was anticipated by Randall's battery, and the 4th regiment was requested not to fire until the battery had done
Joinville, Prince de, 123, 144, 145, 176. Jones, Gen. D. R., 340. Jones, Lieut. J. W., 133. Jones, Maj. R., 124. Kanawha Valley, W. Va., 52, 53, 56, 64, 65. Kauerhem, Capt., 419, 430. Kearny, Gen. P , 80, 81, 138. At Yorktown, 298, 301, 304 ; Williamsburg, 320, 324-326, 332, 333; in pursuit, 341, 352, 354; Fair Oaks, 378, 379, 382, 383 ; Glendale. 430, 432 ; Malvern, 434, 436. Pope's campaign, 509, 510. Keedyswlle — see Antietam. Kelton, Col. J. C., 534, 535, 542. 546. Kern, Capt., 430, 431. Key, Col. T. M.. 123. 134; at Yorktown, 291 ; Antietam, 603, 609. Keyes, Gen. E. D., 80, 81. At Yorktown, 260, 261. 280: letter to Sen. Harris, 267 ; at Williamsburg, 320; in pursuit, 348 ; Fair Oaks, 377-350 ; White Oak Swamp, 423, 426, 427-429 ; Malvern, 434 ; with rear-guard, 435, 444; brevetted, 475. In Maryland, 555. Kimball, Gen N., 594, 597. Kimball, Lieut.-Col., 381. King, Gen. R., 81, 95. Kingsbury, Col. H , 83, 131, 132; at Yorktown, 279; Antietam, 607, 6
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
ght twelvepounders, commanded by Lieutenant A. N. Randol. The centre was held by two Pennsylvania batteries, Cooper's and Kern's, the former of six and the latter of four light twelve-pounders. General Reynolds's brigade, now commanded by Colonel Sfore it was knocked to pieces and compelled to withdraw. Jenkins then gave the order to charge directly upon Cooper's and Kern's guns. It happened that the First Regiment of the Reserves, now the only one remaining of the First Brigade, that had being joined by some troops of Jenkins' brigade, which had been rallied after their ineffectual attempt to take Cooper's and Kern's guns. Kern's battery had just retired, badly used up and having fired every round of its ammunition. Cooper's batterKern's battery had just retired, badly used up and having fired every round of its ammunition. Cooper's battery remained perforce, although in even worse condition, not only almost out of ammunition, but nearly all the horses killed, the limbers of some of the guns injured, and the battery altogether in a nearly useless condition, with two of its lieutenants
hnston, Reverdy, II, 169, 177, 178. Jones, Mr., II, 258. Jones, J. M., II, 22, 90, 91, 95, 101. Julian, George W., II, 171, 253. K Kane, Thomas L., I, 232, 237, 273; II, 91, 92, 94, 101. Kearney, James, I, 111, 148, 209. Kearny, Philip, I, 255, 271, 284, 291, 293, 295, 296, 307, 324. Keith, Washington, II, 240, 241. Kelley, B. F., II, 309, 310. Kelly, Patrick, II, 86. Kemper, James L., I, 287-289, 293. Kendrick, Henry L., I, 12. Kent, Mr., II, 214. Kern, Gen., I, 286, 289, 291. Kershaw, Joseph B., II, 80, 85, 86. Ketland, John, I, 3. Ketland, Thomas, I, 3. Keyes, Erasmus D., I, 250, 253, 284. Kilpatrick, Judson, II, 8, 17, 23, 26, 65, 94, 100, 126, 130, 169, 170, 191, 267. King, Charles, I, 253, 254. King, Rufus, I, 256, 259, 262. Kingsbury, Mr., I, 313. Kinzie, David H., II, 98. Knapp, Joseph M., II, 99. Knieriem, Gen., I, 286, 288, 289. Kuhn, James Hamilton, I, 220, 222, 227, 228, 235, 244, 274, 298, 300, 3
ollowing heads for mills and parts of mills: — Bag-clasp.Flour-dressing machine. Bag-holder.Flour-packer. Balance-rynd.Foot-stalk. Barley-mill.Furrow. Bed-stone.Furrowing-hammer. Bolt.Grain-conveyor. Bolt-feeder.Grain-dryer. Bolting-mill.Grain-elevator. Bosom.Grain-gage. Bran-duster.Grain-huller. Bridge-tree.Hand-mill. Bruiser.Hominy-machine. Bruising-mill.Hoop. Brush-wheel.Hopper. Buckwheat-huller.Hopper-boy. Buhr.Huller. Clack.Hulling-machine. Cider-mill.Husk. Clay-mill.Kern. Cock-eye.Kibbling-mill. Cock-head.Lighter-screw. Corn-mill.Mill (varieties, see mill). Cotton-seed mill.Mill-hopper. Damsel.Mill-pick. Debranning-machine.Millstone. Decorticator.Millstone-balance. Dress.Millstone-bridge. Feed-regulator.Millstone-dress. Flax-seed mill.Millstone-dresser. Flour-bolt.Millstone-feed. Flour-cooler.Millstone-furrower. Millstone-hammer.Runner. Millstone-pick.Rynd. Millstone-regulator.Shoe. Millstone-ventilator.Sifting-machine. Pane.Smut-machine.
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