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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 70 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 29 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 25 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 19 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 16 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 16 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
g distance of him in the rear and upon his flank, while miles of his trains still blocked the roads. For their protection his troops were disposed as follows: Franklin's corps, with Richardson's division of Sumner's corps, and Nagle's brigade of Keyes' corps held the crossings of White Oak swamp, both against the approach of Jackson on the Bottom Bridge road, and of Huger on the Charles City road; the latter being opposed by Slocum's division of Franklin's corps, which was posted north of the these three divisions was open for several hundred yards, and afforded a fine field for their artillery, which was reinforced from the artillery reserve, and unlimbered in heavy force in front of a wood, in which the infantry lines were covered. Keyes' corps, and Sykes' and Morrel's divisions of Porter's corps, held Malvern Hill and its approaches, over which the whole of the Federal trains made their way towards the James, the rear wagons passing at four P. M. The principal effort of General
battle seemed lost to the Southerners. Evans was cut to pieces; Bee shattered and driven back in utter defeat to the Henry-House hill; between the victorious enemy and Beauregard's unprotected flank were interposed only the six hundred men of the Legion already up, and the two thousand six hundred and eleven muskets of Jackson not yet in position. The Legion occupied the Warrenton road near the Stone House, where it met and sustained with stubborn front the torrent dashed against it. General Keyes, with his division, attacked the six hundred from the direction of Red-House ford, and his advance line was forced back by them, and compelled to take refuge beneath the bluffs near Stone bridge. The column of General Hunter, meanwhile, closed in on the left of the little band, enveloped their flank, and poured a destructive artillery fire along the line. To hold their ground further was impossible, and they slowly fell back; but those precious moments had been secured. Jackson was in
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
's Landing. To protect them, Franklin's corps was stationed on the eastern bank of White Oak Swamp; and when Jackson reached it, he stubbornly contested its passage with him during the whole of Monday, June 30th. On the other hand, the corps of Keyes, from McClellan's left, with the beaten troops of Porter, were rapidly marched to Malvern Hill, a range of highlands accessible by the shortest march from the southern end of the Federal line, and overlooking at once the river James, and the Newmes, which he had been left to guard, on the 29th, and march down the New Marker road, to prevent the enemy from reaching the water. He did not approach Malvern Hill until the 30th, when he found it already powerfully occupied by the enemy under Keyes and Porter, crowned by a formidable artillery, and flanked by gunboats in the river. Early on the 29th Major-Generals Longstreet and A. P. Hill were directed to cross the Chickahominy at the New Bridges, and march eastward by the Darby-town road
ctly heard in every house in Richmond. Deep and painful suspense filled all hearts; until at night it was known that the enemy had been driven back and badly punished. The history of Seven Pines is familiar to all. Some days previous, General Keyes' division had been thrown across the Chickahominy, for the purpose of feeling the Confederate lines and throwing up works that would secure the Federals that stream. The river, swelled by recent rains, rose so suddenly as to endanger Keyes' Keyes' communications with his rear; and Johnston determined to attack, while he could thus strike in detail. The miscarriage of part of his planby which Huger's troops did not join the attack-and his own wound, by a piece of shell, late in the afternoon, alone prevented Johnston's utter destruction of this Federal corps. As it was, the enemy was driven two miles back of his camp. Heavily re-enforced next day, he resisted and drove back a desperate attack about Fair Oaks. Now, for the first tim
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
Pope's army had at the time of the battles of the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th of August, been reinforced by Burnside's corps under Reno, one brigade of Sturgis' division from Alexandria, and the following troops from McClellan's army: Heintzelman's corps, Porter's corps, and the division of Pennsylvania reserves commanded by Reynolds. At the time of the affair at Ox Hill he had been further reinforced by Franklin's and Sumner's corps of McClellan's army, leaving but one corps of that army (Keyes') which had not reached him. His consolidated report of the 31st of July showed a strength of 46,858 before he was joined by any of those reinforcements and in the letter of Halleck to McClellan, dated the 6th of August, Pope's army is stated to be about 40,000. In a telegram from Halleck to McClellan, dated the 12th of August, Burnside's force is stated to be nearly 13,000. General Lee's army at the time of these battles near Manassas consisted of Jackson's wing of the army in which th
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
arney, General (U. S. A.), 49, 131 Kearneysville, 163, 383, 409 Keller, Captain, 407 Kelley's Ford, 192, 307, 316 Kelly, General (U. S. A.), 75, 338, 404, 461 Kemper, General J. L., 5, 16, 17, 19, 21-25, 28 Kentucky, 52, 157 Kentucky Military Institute, 477 Kernstown, 240-42, 368, 398-99, 408, 426, 475 Kershaw, General, 27-28, 33, 41, 52, 54, 57, 59, 81, 82, 139, 407-09, 411- 413, 433-35, 437, 441-49, 452, 454 Kettle Run, 115, 304-06 Kettle Run Bridge, 305 Keyes, General (U. S. A.), 132 Kilmer, G. L., 476 Kilpatrick (U. S. A.), 340 King, General (U. S. A.), 74, 122 King, Lieutenant Colonel, 381, 388, 414, 423-25, 427, 460 Kirkland, General, 353 Knights of the Golden Circle, 353 Lacy's Springs, 326, 457 Lamar, Colonel, 153, 180, 388 Lancaster, 261 Lane's Brigade, 171, 173, 199, 274, 355-56 Langhorne, Colonel D. A., 2, 3 Langster's Cross-Roads, 47, 50 Latimer, Captain J. W., 176, 179, 186, 199, 200, 205-06 Lawton, Ca
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
nd Philadelphia assert most positively, and with circumstantiality, that Hooker recrossed the Rappahannock since the battle, and is driving Lee toward Richmond, with which his communications have been interrupted. But this is not all: they say Gen. Keyes marched a column up the Peninsula, and took Richmond itself, over the Capitol of which the Union flag is now flying. These groundless statements will go out to Europe, and may possibly delay our recognition. If so, what may be the consequence About 10 A. M., some 2500 men of all arms arrived at double quick, having left Ashland, eighteen miles distant, at 5 o'clock this morning. That was brisk marching. The guns were sent down on the railroad. The government has information that Gen. Keyes, with a full division of infantry and a brigade of cavalry, had marched up to West Point, to threaten Richmond. The troops, however, which arrived from Ashland, had been taken from the batteries here, and did not belong to Gen. Lee's army.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
be prepared. I saw an indorsement by the President to-day, that foreigners should give guarantees of neutrality or be sent out of the city. Nothing from Lee. June 27 An officer of the Signal Corps reported, yesterday, the force of Gen. Keyes, on the Peninsula, at 6000. To-day we learn that the enemy is in possession of Hanover Junction, cutting off communication with both Fredericksburg and Gordonsville. A train was coming down the Central Road with another installment of the Winof the richest portions of the enemy's country, and the success was equal to the boldness of the undertaking. The expedition, which was conducted by both land and water, was commanded by Col. Kilpatrick. It started from the headquarters of Gen. Keyes on Wendesday, and returned yesterday. In the interim the Counties of Matthews and Gloucester were scoured. All the warehouses containing grain were sacked, the mills burned, and everything that could in any way aid the rebels were destroyed o
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
. If a spy did it, which is probable, the army will soon learn what an easy conquest awaits them. Mr. C. C. Thayer, clerk in the Treasury Department, leaves on the 9th, with $15,000,000 for the trans-Mississippi Department; another clerk has already gone with $10,000,000. After all, I am inclined to think our papers have been lying about the barbarous conduct of the enemy. A letter was received to-day from C. N. Hubbard, a respectable farmer of James City County, stating that when Gen. Keyes came up the Peninsula about the 1st of July, he sent guards for the protection of the property of the people living along the line of march; and they remained, faithfully performing that duty, until the army retired. Mr. H. complains that these guards were made prisoners by our troops, and, if exchanges be demanded for them, he fears the next time the hostile army approaches Richmond, their request for a guard will be refused. What answer the Secretary will make to this, I have no means
n the contrary, the general convened twelve of his division commanders in a council, who voted eight to four for the water route. This finally decided the question in the President's mind, but he carefully qualified the decision by two additional war orders of his own, written without consultation. President's General War Order No. 2 directed that the Army of the Potomac should be immediately organized into four army corps, to be respectively commanded by McDowell, Sumner, Heintzelman, and Keyes, and a fifth under Banks. It is noteworthy that the first three of these had always earnestly advocated the Manassas movement. President's General War Order No. 3 directed, in substance: First. An immediate effort to capture the Potomac batteries. Second. That until that was accomplished not more than two army corps should be started on the Chesapeake campaign toward Richmond. Third. That any Chesapeake movement should begin in ten days; and-Fourth. That no such movement should be ordere
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