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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
s: Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions: Couch, Smith, and Casey. The res — Divisions, Kearny and Hooker; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions, Couch and Casey; Fifth Corps, F. bank. Heintzelman was moved up in support of Keyes. By the 24th, Mechanicsville was carried, so n the 30th of May the Corps of Heintzelman and Keyes were on the right bank of the Chickahominy, thto move in support of Sumner, and a brigade of Keyes's Corps to headquarters for such use as might of my intentions, and gave them their orders. Keyes's Corps was ordered to move at once, with its cceeding night Porter followed the movement of Keyes's Corps and took position to support it. earning, was ordered across the Swamp to relieve Keyes's Corps. This was a critical day; for the cro at 10 P. M. Slocum reached the position of Keyes's Corps early in the afternoon, and, as soon axt pushed forward to establish connection with Keyes and Porter, and hold the different roads by wh[3 more...
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
ill in person leading, toward the crest where Hancock's infantry was posted. The Confederates were met by a severe musketry fire, and at length by a counter charge, led by Hancock, in which the bayonet was used in open field. Generals Sumner, Keyes, and Smith all mentioned Hancock's victory, which was brilliant and decisive. General Smith said in his report, The brilliancy of the plan of battle, the coolness of its execution, the seizing of the proper instant for changing from the defensive to the offensive, the steadiness of the troops engaged, and the completeness of the victory, are subjects to which I earnestly call the attention of the General-in-Chief for just praise. General Keyes wrote, If Hancock had failed, the enemy would not have retreated. It was of this action that McClellan telegraphed to his wife, Hancock was superb.--Editors. The division of Kearny, that was coming to Hooker's aid, was delayed by crowded roads, and reached the field by brigades between 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
., Col. J. H. Hobart Ward: 40th N. Y., Col. Edward J. Riley. Brigade loss: k, 16; w, 92; m, 10==118. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Col. Orlando M. Poe; 3d Mich., Col. Stephen G. Champlin; 5th Mich., Col. Henry D. Terry; 37th N. Y., Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 69; w, 223; m, 7==299. Artillery, Capt. James Thompson: B, 1st N. J., Capt. John E. Beam; E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Fourth Army Corps, Brigadier-General Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 5th U. S., Major Joseph H. Whittlesey. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Col. Julius W. Adams: 65th N. Y. (1st U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieut.-Col. Nelson Cross; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas H. Neill; 31st Pa., Col. David H. Williams; 61st Pa., Col. Oliver H. Rippey. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck: 55th N. Y., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand; 62d N. Y., Col. John L. Riker; 93d Pa., Col. Jam
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
easy to reconcile this increase of my command by the President, with his very numerous disparaging notices of me. General Keyes, before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, confirmed my opinion in saying that Gloucester must have fallen uponscription [II., 122-3] of the vicinity of Seven Pines and of the disposition of the Federal troops. On the 23d of May, Keyes's Federal corps crossed to the south side of the Chickahominy, and a detachment attacked Hatton's Confederate brigade, wheven Pines, with a line of skirmishers a half mile in advance; Couches was at Seven Pines and Fair Oaks — the two forming Keyes's corps. Kearny's division was near Savage's Station, and Hooker's two miles west of Bottom's Bridge — the two forming two regiments of R. H. Anderson's brigade reinforced Hill's troops, and the Federals were driven back to Seven Pines. Keyes's corps (Casey's and Couch's divisions) was united at Seven Pines and reinforced by Kearny's division, coming from Savage
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
. Staples; 4th Me., Col. Elijah Walker; 38th N. Y., Col. J. H. H. Ward, Maj. William H. Baird; 40th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Thomas W. Egan. Brigade loss: k, 23; w, 174; m, 10 =207. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram G. Berry: 2d Mich., Col. Orlando M. Poe; 3d Mich., Col. S. G. Champlin (w), Lieut.-Col. A. A. Stevens; 5th Mich., Col. Henry D. Terry; 37th N. Y., Lieut-Col. Gilbert Riordan (temporarily), Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 84; w, 344; m, 36 = 464. Fourth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. E. D. Keyes. Cavalry, 8th Pa., Col. D. McM. Gregg. Loss: w, 2; m, 2 =4. first division, Brig.-Gen. D. N. Couch. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck: 55th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Louis Thourot; 62d N. Y., Col. J. Lafayette Riker (k), Lieut.-Col. David J. Nevin; 93d N. Y., Col. J. M. McCarter (w), Capt. John E. Arthur; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley (w), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Kinkead. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 236; m, 64 = 347. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Abercrombie: 65
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
t he had orders or authority to do so. But General Keyes's report, made that morning, develops the istance could have reached us. Isolated as Keyes's corps was, every effort should have been mad break through it and carry the earth-works of Keyes's second line. Thus, after more than two hour which prevented Sumner's forces from reaching Keyes at Seven Pines, and incidentally deprived KeyeeNine-mile road, and support Hill by attacking Keyes's right flank. It is noticeable that General t] was six miles from those of Heintzelman and Keyes, which were near Bottom's Bridge. In referencnts of Hooker's division were close in rear of Keyes, and two brigades of Kearny's division were iny reinforcements had come up to the support of Keyes, and that General G. W. Smith had been checked latter to throw Longstreet's division against Keyes's exposed and weak right flank was the best pl of complete Confederate success in wiping out Keyes's corps, early in the morning of May 31st, bef[31 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
dson S. Farrer; 1st N. Y., Col. Garrett Dyckman; 37th N. Y., Col. Samuel B. Hayman. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 225, m, 176 == 429. Artillery: E, 1st R. I., Capt. George E. Randolph; G, 2d U. S., Capt. James Thompson. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 16; m, 5==23. reserve artillery, Capt. Gustavus A. De Russy: 6th N. Y., Capt. Walter M. Bramhall; 2d N. J., Capt. John E. Beam (k), Lieut. John B. Monroe; K, 4th U. S., Lieut. Francis W. Seeley. Loss: k, 1; w, 3; m, 1 == 5. Fourth Corps, Brig.-Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes. Cavalry: 8th Pa., Col. David McM. Gregg. first division, Brig.-Gen. Darius N. Couch. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albion P. Howe: 55th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Louis Thourot; 62d N. Y., Col. David J. Nevin; 93d Pa., Capt. John S. Long; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley. Brigade loss: k, 27; w, 148; m, 33==208. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Abercrombie: 65th N. Y. (lst U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
er's corps and the cavalry engaged in protecting McClellan's right flank and communications, was posted on the south side of the Chickahominy behind the line of intrenchments here shown. The divisions of Longstreet and the two Hills who had confronted McClellan were withdrawn, in order to unite with Jackson's three divisions (coming from the Shenandoah) in the attack in force upon Porter's corps at Gaines's Mill. Magruder's and Huger's divisions were left to engage the attention of Sumner, Keyes, Heintzelman, and Franklin. The attack of Lee's six divisions fell upon Porter's corps, which was reenforced during the battle by Slocum's three brigades of Franklin. Central Railroad, 2 miles from Hanover Court House, where we came in presence of the enemy. At once a force of infantry (Colonel C. A. Johnson's 25th New York Volunteers and Berdan's Sharp-shooters), protected by artillery, was sent forward to hold the enemy in check, pending the arrival of Morell, who was slowly pushi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
iles north of Fair Oaks station], and my other division, General Slocum's, was next on the left. Going toward the left, General Sumner's corps came next, then General Heintzelman's, and then, on the extreme left reaching to White Oak Swamp, General Keyes's corpse. General Heintzelman's corps, the 3d, advanced to the positions held by its outposts on the 26th, after a sharp engagement along the whole line on the 25th, known as Oak Grove, or King's School House. Oak Grove was the first of th fire and were run back to Bottom's bridge, where they plunged into the Chickahominy, as shown in the picture on the next page. General Slocum's division was to be at Savage's Station, in reserve. Then came Sumner's corps and Heintzelman's. Keyes's corps was to cross the White Oak Swamp at once. Porters corps had already crossed the swamp, and was under orders to press forward to a position on the James River. This new line was about two miles nearer the White Oak Bridge than the intr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
Glendale), June 30, 1862, showing Approximate positions of Union and Confederate troops. Also disposition of troops during the artillery engagement at White Oak Bridge. Union brigades: 1, Sickles; 2, Carr; 3, Grover; 4, Seymour; 5, Reynolds (Simmons); 6, Meade (this brigade should be represented as north of the road); 7, Robinson; 8, Birney; 9, Berry; 10, Newton; 11, Bartlett; 12,12, Taylor; 13, Burns; 11, 14, Dana; 15,15, Sully; 16, 16, Caldwell; 17, French; 18, Meagher; 19, Na glee (of Keyes's corps); 20, Davidson; 21, Brooks; 22, Hancock. Randol's battery was on the right of the road, Kerns's and Cooper's on the left, and Diederichs's and Knieriem's yet farther to the left. Thompson's battery of Kearny's division was with General Robinson's brigade (7). Confederate brigades: a, Kemper; b, Pickett (Hunton); c, R. II. Anderson (Jenkins); d, Wilcox; e, Featherston; f, Pryor; g, Branch; h, Archer; i, Field; j, J. R. Anderson; k, Pender; l, Gregg; m, n, o, p, Armistead, Wright
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