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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
ir number-this was the problem, the solution of which was of no small labor to General Lee. To accomplish such results no plan of organization presented itself in the formation of either army. The only thing known among military men that would in any degree approach the formation indicated, was the embodiment of a regiment for each division, after the manner of the Zouave regiments of the French service. There, as is known, to each division of the army is attached a corps, who act, as Kinglake aptly puts it, as the spike-head of the division, being used either to push in, or else to ward off attack. There was, however, a serious difficulty in the way of constantly employing a regiment on this kind of duty; for, while one regiment, taken as a whole, were always safe to be relied on for line fighting, it was well-nigh impossible to find such an organization in any division as combined all the qualities found necessary for single and determined picket fighting. Besides, at this t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 10: life at camp Shaw. (search)
ce in being ordered on active service, where a few strokes of the pen will dispose of all this multiplicity of trappings as expended in action or lost in service. For one, the longer I remained in service, the better I appreciated the good sense of most of the regular army niceties. True, these things must all vanish when the time of action comes, but it is these things that have prepared you for action. Of course, if you dwell on them only, military life becomes millinery life alone. Kinglake says that the Russian Grand-Duke Constantine, contemplating his beautiful toy-regiments, said that he dreaded war, for he knew that it would spoil the troops. The simple fact is, that a soldier is like the weapon he carries; service implies soiling, but you must have it clean in advance, that when soiled it may be of some use. The men had that year a Christmas present which they enjoyed to the utmost,--furnishing the detail, every other day, for provost-guard duty in Beaufort. It was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
the news of the Trent affair, that if war should come, Ireland would be found on the side of America. This declaration was received with the most vehement applause. and others less conspicuous; while Lord Brougham, who for sixty years was an opponent of slavery, and was known to be thoroughly conversant with the structure of our Government, and an admirer of its practical workings, following the lead of the spirit of his class, took sides with the slaveholders, and said most unkind words. Kinglake, the eminent author and member of Parliament, announced, as a principle which he had always enforced, that in the policy of states a sentiment never can govern ; that ideas of right, justice, philanthropy, or common humanity should have no influence in the dealings of one nation with another, because they are almost always governed by their great interests, which he thought to be a sound principle; while Thomas Carlyle, the cold Gothicizer of the English language, dismissed the whole matter
iar feature of heroic verse and story in every land, until the whole world has heard of the gallant Six Hundred and their ride into the Valley of Death. Now, as the Light Brigade accomplished nothing in this action,--merely executed an order which was a blunder,--it must be that it was the danger and its attendant loss which inspired the interest in that historic ride. What was the loss? The Light Brigade took 673 officers and men into that charge; they lost 113 killed and 134 wounded Kinglake.; total, 247, or 36.7 per cent. The heaviest loss in the German Army during the Franco-Prussian war occurred in the Sixteenth Infantry (Third Westphalian), at Mars La Tour. Like all German regiments of the line it numbered 3,006 men. As this battle was the first in which it was engaged,--occurring within a few days of the opening of the campaign,--it carried 3,000 men into action. It lost 509 killed and mortally wounded, 619 wounded, and 365 missing Dr. Engel: Director des koniglich
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harper's Magazine, Nov., 1875, pp. 777-796; and afterwards reprinted in a volume entitled Barry Cornwall and some of his Friends, pp. 9, 47, 65, 101. Sumner was one of the guests, in 1859, at a dinner given by Mr. Procter to Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S. P. S. What will be my prospects at the bar on my return? Will they say I am spoiled? I have received a most friendly letter from Miss Edge-worth, expressing her regret that I did not vis
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harper's Magazine, Nov., 1875, pp. 777-796; and afterwards reprinted in a volume entitled Barry Cornwall and some of his Friends, pp. 9, 47, 65, 101. Sumner was one of the guests, in 1859, at a dinner given by Mr. Procter to Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C. S.
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 3 (search)
und Washington an army both formidable in numbers and respectable in efficiency. There then arose the problem of putting it in motion; and this problem involved two questions—when to strike, and where? The latter was a question that concerned the general-in-chief; but the former was one that profoundly touched the people, who, as the sustainers of the war, thronged in and made their voice heard, and became partakers of the counsels of state. This is the striking expression employed by Mr. Kinglake in describing the influence of English public sentiment in enforcing the War of the Crimea. During that period in which the army was a—fashioning, the public remained silent. And there was in this silence something almost pathetic; for, knowing that an undue urgency for action, expressed through the public prints, had precipitated the disastrous campaign that ended in Bull Run, men sought to make amends by a sedulous refraining from the like again. General McClellan was left free to
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Index. (search)
h, 567; on the Confederate commissariat and conscription, 572. Jomini on the difficulties of an invading army, 24; on interference with generals in the field, 96; on concentric operations, 410. Jones, General, on the battle of An tietam, 212. Kearney's assault at Manassas No. 2, 185. Kearney, General, the death of, 192; his origination of the badge system, 268. Kelley's Ford, the Union cavalry at, 268; cavalry action at, 386. Kilpatrick's raid towards Richmond, 399. Kinglake, Mr., on English public sentiment on the Crimean war, 68. Laurel Hill, Virginia, Garnett's position at, 35; McClellan's plan of attack, 37; abandoned by Garnett, 38; see also Rich Mountain. Lee, General Robert E., appointed major-general, and commander of the Virginia forces, 26; defence of West Virginia, 34; on the poor discipline of the army, 67; appointed to Army of Northern Virginia, 142; withdraws Jackson from Shenandoah Valley, 148; plan of attack on the Chickahominy, 144; concent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Tarheels' thin Gray line. (search)
y line. Colin Campbell's Highlanders Outdone by North Carolinians. By Gen. Bradley T. Johnson. With corrections and Additions by R. D. Stewart. (An incident of the battle of Winchester, Va., that surpasses the 93d regiment's famous stand on the morning of Balaklava.—How General Robert D. Johnston repelled repeated charges of Yankee cavalry far outnumbering his attenuated brigade—as told by General Bradley T. Johnston.) At the battle of Balaklava occurred an incident which Kinglake has painted in words, and thus immortalized. The Highland brigade, the 42d, the Black Watch, the Cold Stream Guards, the Grenadiers, and the 93d, Sir Colin Campbell's old regiment, were in position which threw the 93d just along the crest of a slight rise of the ground. The Russian artillery had become annoying, and the 93d lay down just behind the crest, where they were better sheltered and concealed. A division of Russian horse was moving to the left of Sir Colin's whole line, and it
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes (search)
ut a hook into the sea, and the fish readily took it, and they caught him. He was longer than myself. I think he was about six feet long, and the largest that ever I saw. This plainly showed us that we ought not to distrust the providence of the Almighty. The people were quieted by this act of Providence, and murmured no more. We caught enough to eat plentifully of, till we got into the capes of Delaware. Note 5, page 153. An interesting account of Lady Hester Stanhope may be found in Kinglake's Eothen, chapter VIII. Note 6, page 255. Too late I loved Thee, O Beauty of ancient days, yet ever new! And lo! Thou wert within, and I abroad searching for thee. Thou wert with me, but I was not with Thee.—August. Soliloq., Book X. Note 7, page 255. And I saw that there was an Ocean of Darkness and Death: but an infinite Ocean of Light and Love flowed over the Ocean of Darkness: And in that I saw the infinite Love of God.—George Fox's Journal. Note 8, page 256. The story of t
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