Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Lamar or search for Lamar in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 59: cordiality of senators.—last appeal for the Civil-rights bill. —death of Agassiz.—guest of the New England Society in New York.—the nomination of Caleb Cushing as chief-justice.—an appointment for the Boston custom-house.— the rescinding of the legislative censure.—last effort in debate.—last day in the senate.—illness, death, funeral, and memorial tributes.—Dec. 1, 1873March 11, 1874. (search)
ouse the eulogies, cordial and affectionate like those of the Senate, were from Dawes and the brothers Hoar of Massachusetts, Conger of Michigan, Kelley of Pennsylvania, Phillips of Kansas, Rainey of South Carolina, Nesmith of Oregon, and notably Lamar of Mississippi, a former Confederate officer. The Boston Advertiser, April 29, 1874, singled out Mr. Lamar's tribute as the most significant and hopeful utterance that has been heard from the South since the war. Nesmith, a Democrat, who had sMr. Lamar's tribute as the most significant and hopeful utterance that has been heard from the South since the war. Nesmith, a Democrat, who had served with him in the Senate and was rarely in accord with him in that body, closed his eulogy thus:— His chair in the Senate, to which all eyes were turned whenever any great question agitated that grave body, will never be filled by a public servant more pure in his natives, more elevated and courageous in his action, or truer to his convictions. Let us keep his virtues in remembrance. May his monument be of spotless marble, for it cannot be purer or whiter than his life. Wilson,