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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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That those who desire to learn the names of the missing, remaining after taking up those men captured accounted for in this last writing, can do so without the labor of examining the roster name by name, the following list is given:— List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner,
List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Charles H., Private. Proctor, Joseph J., Corp. weeks, John, Private. Co. G. Body, Charles, Private. Myers, William, Private.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 54. the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
were immediately pushed down the Point to Battery Buchanan, whither many of the garrison had fled. On reaching the battery all of the enemy who had not been previously captured were made prisoners. Among them were Major-General Whiting, and Colonel Lamb, the commandant of the fort. About four o'clock in the afternoon Hoke advanced against our north line, apparently with the design of attacking it; but if such was his intention he abandoned it after a skirmish with our pickets. During thet of the work, a shell exploded near him, taking off his left arm and seriously injuring his throat. He was afterward shot in the right arm. For his services on this occasion, as well as those on a former one, I most earnestly urge his promotion. Captain Dawson was disabled by a wound in the left arm. To Captain Lockwood, General Whiting and Colonel Lamb surrendered with the garrison at Fort Buchanan. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. Ames, Brigadier-General Volunteers.
Wilmington, December 31, 1864. Colonel — For the information of the General commanding, I forward the report of Colonel Lamb, commanding Fort Fisher in the action of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth: On receiving the information at one P. M. il Tuesday morning, when they were relieved by the supports of Major-General Hoke and the embarkation of the enemy. Colonel Lamb's report, herewith, gives all the details of the action. In an accompanying paper I will give you an account in detaifficer Pinckney, Confederate States navy, who was present during the action, for the welcome and efficient aid sent to Colonel Lamb, the detachment under Lieutenant Roby, which manned the two Brook guns, and the company of marines, under Captain Van Headquarters Department of N. C. P. S.--I wish it to be understood that in no sense did I assume the command of Colonel Lamb. I was a witness simply, confining my action to observation and advice, and to our communications, and it is as a wit
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, C. P. Cranch. (search)
rtunately it did not occur to him at the moment, that the test of such a theory would be its application to sculpture. He wondered what Raphael would have thought of it. It was quite a grief to Cranch that his own daughter, who inherited his talent, should have deserted him at this juncture, and gone over to the opposition. She filled his house with rough, heavily-shaded studies of still-life, flowers, and faces of her friends; but of all Hunt's pupils, Miss Cranch, Miss Knowlton, and Miss Lamb were the only ones who achieved artistic distinction in their special work. It was in order to withdraw her from this Walpurgis art-dance that Cranch undertook his last journey to Paris in his seventieth year. There the young lady quickly dropped her Boston method, and, acquiring a more conservative handling, became an excellent portrait painter; too soon, however, obliged to relinquish her art on account of ill-health. Cranch's landscapes now adorn the walls of private houses; ver
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
hing he undertook to perform. This kind of feeling I would recommend to all young persons both male & female : as it will certainly tend to secure admission to the company of the more intelligent; & better portion of every community. By all means endeavor to excel in some laudable pursuit. I had like to have forgotten to tell you of one of John's misfortunes which set rather hard on him while a young boy. He had by some means perhaps by gift of his Father become the owner of a little Ewe Lamb which did finely till it was about Two Thirds grown; & then sickened & died. This brought another protracted mourning, season: not that he felt the pecuniary loss so much: for that was never his disposition: but so strong & earnest were his attachments. John had been taught from earliest childhood to fear God & keep his commandments; & though quite skeptical he had always by turns felt much serious doubt as to his future well being; & about this time became to some extent a convert to Ch
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: the father of the man. (search)
hing he undertook to perform. This kind of feeling I would recommend to all young persons both male & female : as it will certainly tend to secure admission to the company of the more intelligent; & better portion of every community. By all means endeavor to excel in some laudable pursuit. I had like to have forgotten to tell you of one of John's misfortunes which set rather hard on him while a young boy. He had by some means perhaps by gift of his Father become the owner of a little Ewe Lamb which did finely till it was about Two Thirds grown; & then sickened & died. This brought another protracted mourning, season: not that he felt the pecuniary loss so much: for that was never his disposition: but so strong & earnest were his attachments. John had been taught from earliest childhood to fear God & keep his commandments; & though quite skeptical he had always by turns felt much serious doubt as to his future well being; & about this time became to some extent a convert to Ch
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
heaven; and the camp becomes a school of Christ. From the very first day of the unhappy contest to the present time, religious influences have been spreading among the soldiers, until now, in camp and hospital, throughout every portion of the army, revivals display their precious, saving power. In one of these revivals over three hundred are known as having professed conversion, while, doubtless, there are hundreds of others equally blessed, whose names, unrecorded here, find a place in the Lamb's book of life. And in 1865, in reviewing the blessed work of saving souls amid the bloody scenes of four gloomy years, the board said: Millions of pages of tracts have been put in circulation, and thousands of sermons delivered by the sixty missionaries whom we have sent to our brave armies. If it could be known by us here and now how many souls have been saved by this agency, doubtless the announcement would fill us with surprise and rejoicing. Hundreds and thousands, we verily b
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
believe Christ will take me to Himself, and to my dear sister, who is in heaven. The voice of the dying boy faltered in the intervals between these precious sentences. When the hymn, commencing, Nearer, my God, to Thee, was read to him, at the end of each stanza he exclaimed, with striking energy, O Lord Jesus, thou art coming nearer to me. Also, at the end of each stanza of the hymn commencing— Just as I am—without one plea, But that Thy blood was shed for me, he exclaimed—I come! O Lamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to Thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic, who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed unt<
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
ergy, O Lord Jesus, thou art coming nearer to me. Also, at the end of each stanza of the hymn (which was also read to him) commencing, Just as I am—without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bid'st me come to thee, O Lamb of God, I come, he exclaimed, I come! O Lamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to Thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep iLamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to Thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers, and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed until last night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. Rev. J. W. Talley, of Georgia, thus describes the death of his son at Leesburg, from wounds received at Sharpsb
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