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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War, Chapter 5: helps to the revival-colportage. (search)
aven; and the camp becomes a school of Christ. From the very first day of the unhappy contest to the present time, religious influences have been spreading among the soldiers, until now, in camp and hospital, throughout every portion, of the army, revivals display their precious, saving power. In one of these revivals over three hundred are known as having professed conversion, while, doubtless, there are hundreds of others equally blessed, whose names, unrecorded here, find a place in the Lamb's book of life. And in 1865, in reviewing the blessed work of saving souls amid the bloody scenes of four gloomy years, the Board said: Millions of pages of tracts have been put in circulation, and thousands of sermons delivered by the sixty missionaries whom we have sent to our brave armies. If it could be known by us here and now how many souls have been saved by this agency, doubtless the announcement would fill us with surprise and rejoicing. Hundreds and thousands, we verily b
gy, Oh, Lord Jesus, thou art coming nearer to me. Also, at the end of each stanza of the hymn (which was also read to him) commencing, Just as I am-without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bid'st me come to thee, O Lamb of God, I come, he exclaimed, I come! O Lamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep iLamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers, and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed until last night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. It was such evidences of the power and value of faith in Christ that made the truth effectual in the salvation
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
weary of life, would have been glad to lie down with her arms round the wayside cross, and sleep away into a brighter scene. Just before beginning the writing of The minister's Wooing she sent the following letter to Lady Byron:-- Andover, June 30, 1858. My Dear Friend,--I did long to hear from you at a time when few knew how to speak, because I knew that you did know everything that sorrow can teach, --you whose whole life has been a crucifixion, a long ordeal. But I believe that the Lamb, who stands forever in the midst of the throne as it had been slain, has everywhere his followers, those who are sent into the world, as he was, to suffer for the redemption of others, and like him they must look to the joy set before them of redeeming others. I often think that God called you to this beautiful and terrible ministry when He suffered you to link your destiny with one so strangely gifted, so fearfully tempted, and that the reward which is to meet you, when you enter within t
865, expiration of service. Kelly, Thomas,28Boston, Ma.Dec. 18, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Kimball, Martin B.,25Boston, Ma.Oct. 16, 1861Oct. 16, 1864, expiration of service. King, Phineas F.,26Watertown, Ma.July 31, 18611862, disability. Knight, Thomas W.,19Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Knights, William W.,29Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Lamberton, George,42Sandwich, Ma.Mar. 10, 1864July 1, 1864, disability. Lamb, Hiram K.,46Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Apr. 15, 1862, disability. Lancy, Eli S.,32Lunenburg, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Lang, James,27Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Feb. 15, 1864, re-enlistment. Lang, James,29Boston, Ma.Feb. 16, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Lancour, Louis,37Hadley, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Larrabee, George W.,25Boston, Ma.Dec. 18, 1863Died Apr. 16, 1864, New Orleans, La. Larivere, Jacob,23Hadley, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864Au
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
asure than Pain I cou'd write whole Volumes if I thought it wou'd Redound to your happiness, but the Distance we are apart and the Uncertainty of Conveyance Confines [me to] very Narrow limits. I know of nothing in this life that wou'd [aug]ment my happiness more than to be at Home with my Family and Free'd from a Tempestuous Sky and Enraged Ocean, with Just Enough (Good God) to Supply our Real Wants and Necessities and Cou'd I once more enjoy a Ray of Divine Light from the Throne of God and Lamb I shou'd be the happiest of Sinners. We shall sail for Newfoundland the first fair wind and hope we Shall not stay over four Weeks there but it is a difficult Season of the year and if we are gone two months . . . A year later, Abijah announces to his mother and stepfather his intention to return to the old home of the Puritan settlers on the St. John—to Essex County, Masschusetts. His wife appends a brief postscript, and the letter, precious for its incidental family history and chara
oro's street, kept by Wheelock, 1803 In Bromfield lane, kept by Trask, 1813 King's Head, kept near Scarlet's Wharf, 1670 One kept in King street, 1758 Light House, kept in King street, 1718 Logwood Tree, kept in Lynn street, 1732 Lamb, in Newbury street, 1743 In Newbury street, near Watch House, 1771 Register of Deeds' office there, 1786 Tavern Lamb, in Newbury street. Old house removed; Adams House built, 1845 Lamphire's, 24 Hanover street, kept by B. LamphireLamb, in Newbury street. Old house removed; Adams House built, 1845 Lamphire's, 24 Hanover street, kept by B. Lamphire, 1807 Moreau's, in Elm street, kept by Mrs. Moreau, 1805 Nahant, at Nahant, built, 1820 Burned, Sep. 11, 1861 Punch Bowl, in Dock square, kept by Mrs. Baker, 1769 Patterson's, in Elm street, kept by Patterson, 1796 Queen's Head, kept near Scarlet's Wharf, 1691 Red Lion, kept near Red Lion Wharf, 1674 Roebuck, in Fish lane, Roebuck passage, 1732 House removed, 1815 Royal Exchange, kept in King street, 1732 Ship, Noah's Ark, in Ship street, built, 1646 Kept by
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
A. Shipley, John G. White. Captured-Corp. Edward A. Welch; Privates Robert M. Dawson, Walter Mullikin, Francis E. Storm, Justus Schultz. Company D, Capt. Joseph L. McAleer commanding. Killed—Privates James A. Brown, Cornelius Kerns. Wounded—Sergt. Wm. Jenkins, Corp. Joshua Owings, mortally, Corp. Emmett W. Webb, mortally; Privates Lewis Green, John Hays, Thos. J. Hines, Richard G. Killman, Philip Lipscomb, James H. O'Brien, John H. Septer, Wm. Watts. Captured—Privates Wm. Hogarty, John Lamb. Company E, Capt. John W. Torsch, commanding. Wounded—First Lieut. Wm. J. Broadfoot, mortally, Sergt. P. M. Moore, mortally, Corp. John Cain, Corp. James Reddie; privates, Michael Barry, Charles E. Byus, John Brown, Alex. Brandt, James Fallon, Edward Fallis, J. S. Halbig, James Lemates, John N. Martin, Wm. P. Moran, Daniel McGee, Frank Roberts, Herman H. Radeke, John Sullivan, Wm. A. Wilkinson. Captured— Michael Burke. Company F, Captain Andrew J. Gwynn, commanding. Killed—Henry G
been equalled in modern battle. The rebels had fallen back, but it was only to rally. Fort Fisher was not captured because the parapet was reached. Whiting and Lamb brought up their men, encouraging and cheering them to heroic efforts. The huge traverses were used for breastworks, and over their tops the contending parties fiery Buchanan, whither many of the garrison had fled, and here all who had not previously been captured were made prisoners, including Major-General Whiting and Colonel Lamb, the commandant of the fort, both severely wounded. Valuable material for the account of this assault has been obtained from a paper entitled Capture of Forcret to a national officer. The blockaderun-nears anchored off the fort, and their commanders came ashore to deliver their papers, but, instead of handing them to Lamb, were obliged to give them up to Terry. Two valuable cargoes and two of the fastest-sailing vessels in these waters thus fell into the national hands. Several Br
y, neutrality of, i., 11; strategical situation in, 22. Kershaw, General, in Valley of Virginia, III., 84; at battle of Cedar creek, 93, 94, 96, 97; returns to Lee, 101; captured at battle of Sailor's creek, 577. Kilpatrick, General, Judson, sent south of Atlanta, II. 544; in command of cavalry in Sherman's army, III., 283; in march to sea, 288, 289, 293; in campaign through Carolinas, 373. Kingston taken by Sherman, II., 535. Knoxville, danger of, i., 531; siege of, 534-543. Lamb, Colonel, commandant of Fort Fisher, III., 341, 343. Lauman, General J. G., at siege of Vicksburg, i., 352. Lawler, General M. K., at Black river bridge, i., 277. Ledlie, General James H., before Petersburg, July 30, 1864, II., 477. Lee, Admiral, guarding James river, II., 351; in command of gunboat fleet at West, III., 65. Lee, General Robert E. in command of army of Northern Virginia, II., 5; battle of the Wilderness, 101-134; at Spottsylvania, 134-209; movement to the North Anna
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8 (search)
my right we could hear Lomax's guns receding. I saw we had no possible chance now but to move out, and that, at a run, my left had given away, and it was only by a quick run that we escaped capture. Lieutenant-Colonel Cary Breckenridge had the best opportunity, being on the extreme right—held his regiment in hand, covered by the Sharpshooters of the Second, and when they arrived in some timber, half a mile in the rear, he formed his regiment, and upon which the brigade was soon formed. Captain Lamb of the Third. Hobson of the Fourth, Captain James Breckenridge of the Second, kept his Sharpshooters well out, and Captain Litchfield of the First, were all active with their Sharpshooters, and conspicuous in their efforts. My men could see the enemy's numbers, and it was clear from the very start that this handful had not a glimmering of a chance in its favor. Had we retired at once, we could have done so without trouble, and with credit; had we attempted to hold our line any longer
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