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ed more saddle-bags, Stillman's men having thrown away a good many. The Indians then spread their scouts over the country, who killed and plundered the settlers, while the main body retired up Rock River to the Four Lakes. In the mean time, Governor Reynolds was obliged to yield to the clamors of Whitesides's militia, and disbanded them on the 26th of May, which put a stop for a time to the campaign. Abraham Lincoln was a captain in Whitesides's command, and is said, by his biographer, Lamon, in his queer narrative, to have reenlisted as a private in an independent spy company. Jefferson Davis, who was with General Gaines in his operations in 1831, was absent on furlough in Mississippi when the Black-Hawk War broke out, but gave up his furlough, and, joining his company, served in the campaign. Thus, in early life and with small rank, met as co-workers in this remote field, three men, who, forty years later, measured arms on an arena whose contest shook the world. Lieutenants
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxix. (search)
Lxix. The last story told by Mr. Lincoln was drawn out by a circumstance which occurred just before the interview with Messrs. Colfax and Ashmun, on the evening of his assassination. Marshal Lamon of Washington had called upon him with an application for the pardon of a soldier. After a brief hearing the President took the application, and when about to write his name upon the back of it, he looked up and said: Lamon, have you ever heard how the Patagonians eat oysters? They open thLamon, have you ever heard how the Patagonians eat oysters? They open them and throw the shells out of the window until the pile gets higher than the house, and then they move; adding: I feel to-day like commencing a new pile of pardons, and I may as well begin it just here, At the subsequent interview with Messrs. Colfax and Ashmun, Mr. Lincoln was in high spirits. The uneasiness felt by his friends during his visit to Richmond was dwelt upon, when he sportively replied that he supposed he should have been uneasy also, had any other man been President and gon
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
tunes 239; Fox River, 240; nudum pactum 241; harmonizing the Democracy, 244; Mrs. Sallie Ward and her children, 247; a Western judge, 250; lost my apple overboard, 252; rigid government and close construction, 254; breakers ahead, 256; counterfeit bill, 262; blasting rocks, 262; General Phelps's emancipation proclamation, 273; making ministers, 277; John Tyler 278; the Irish soldier and Jacob Thompson, 283; Jeff. Davis and the coon, 284; last story,--how Patagonians eat oysters, told to Marshal Lamon on evening of assassination, 285. M. Marine Band, 168. Massa Sam's dead, 207. McClellan, 130, 113, 227, 255. McCulloch, Hon., Hugh, 179, 185. McKaye, Colonel, 208. McVeagh, 242. Memory, 52. Miller, Hon. S. F., 174. Mills, Judge J. T., ( Wis.,) 305. Mix, Captain, 261. Moody, Colonel, 102. Morgan, John, 259. Morgan, Senator, 74. Murtagh, Mr., (Washington,) 321. N. Nasby papers, 151. Newspapers, 154. Nicolay, 149. Norfolk, (capture,) 104, 240. N
United States Government. We have not oil enough to keep a light in the lantern for one night. The boats will have to, therefore, rely at night entirely upon other marks. I ought to have been informed that this expedition was to come. Colonel Lamon's remark convinced me that the idea, merely hinted at to me by Colonel Fox, would not be carried out. We shall strive to do our duty, though I frankly say that my heart is not in this war, which I see is to be thus commenced. That God wimself says, in his published letter, I made no arrangements with Major Anderson for supplying the fort, nor did I inform him of my plan; and Major Anderson, in the letter above, says the idea had been merely hinted at by Captain Fox, and that Colonel Lamon had led him to believe that it had been abandoned. When General Beauregard discovered that Major Anderson was endeavoring to strengthen, in place of evacuating, Fort Sumter, the Commissioners wrote an interrogatory note to discover the fa
March 25. Colonel Lamon, a Government messenger, had an interview at Charleston with Governor Pickens and General Beauregard.--Times, March 26. The rumors from Charleston are very conflicting concerning the evacuation of Fort Sumter. One report states that Major Anderson is strengthening his position; another, that he has received orders to evacuate the fort and report himself for duty at Newport barracks, and that the officers are packing their goods in expectation of immediate departure. The truth of the matter will probably be known in a day or two.--Evening Post.
vate in Company G, Thirteenth Indiana, wounded.--Louisville Journal, November 9. The Tenth Legion N. Y. S. V., under the command of Colonel C. H. Van Wyck, left Newburgh for the seat of war.--The Forty-first regiment of Ohio Volunteers, under the command of Colonel William B. Hazen, left Camp Wood, at Cleveland, for the seat of war in Kentucky.--N. Y. Herald, November 7. Gens. Grant and McClernand, of the United States forces, left Cairo for Belmont, a rebel post opposite Columbus, Ky., on the Mississippi, with the Twenty-second Illinois regiment, Colonel Dougherty; the Twenty-seventh Illinois regiment, Colonel Buford; the Thirtieth Illinois regiment, Colonel Fouke; the Thirty-first Illinois regiment, Colonel Logan; the Seventh Iowa regiment, Colonel Lamon; Taylor's Chicago Artillery, and Dollen's and Delano's Cavalry, in all three thousand five hundred men, on the steamers Alex. Scott, Chancellor, Memphis, and Keystone State, accompanied by the gunboats Lexington and Tyler.
he jail, advertising them, and waiting for masters to appear, prove property, pay charges, and take the human chattels away. Mr. Lincoln's Marshal, Col. Ward II. Lamon, came with him from Jllinois, but was a Virginian by birth, and did not revolt at the abundant and profitable custom brought to his shop by the practice just depica boy who claimed to be free-born, yet who had been confined there thirteen months and four days on suspicion of being a runaway slave. He further stated that Marshal Lamon had forbidden Members of Congress access to the prison without his written permission. Messrs. Powell, of Kentucky, Pearce, of Maryland, and Carlile, of Vir was taken, however, upon this, nor upon the Senate's kindred measure; because the President, through Secretary Seward, addressed Jan. 25, 1862. an order to Marshal Lamon, directing limn not to receive into custody any persons caught up as fugitives from Slavery, but to discharge, ten days there-after, all such persons now in hi
ant John G. Hovey, of Company B, Massachusetts Thirteenth, is the provost marshal. Among his political prisoners are R. D. Shepperd, of Shepherdstown, son-in-law of Alexander Boteler; Abraham Shepard, a captain in the rebel army, and a considerable number of civil officers of Morgan County who undertook to execute the rebel laws. Telegraphic communications are now received from Romney in four hours, including twenty miles of horse transportation. In a few days the wires will connect. Lamon's brigade (the First Virginia regiment) consists of three companies of cavalry, now with General Kelly; four companies of infantry, and two companies of artillery, under Colonel Leonard. The latter have volunteered to act as riflemen until their batteries are received. A specimen of forced marching occurred on Wednesday night. Colonel Kenly's First Maryland regiment left their camp near Frederick at twelve o'clock and arrived here at ten o'clock on Thursday morning--a distance of nearly
ent at Washington Fox's visit to Charleston-secret preparations for coercive measures visit of Lamon renewed assurances of good faith notification to Governor Pickens developments of secret hister [says Governor Pickens, in the message already quoted above], another confidential agent, Colonel Lamon, was sent by the President [Mr. Lincoln], who informed me that he had come to try and arrang Fox was making active, though secret, preparations for his relief expedition. Colonel, or Major Lamon, as he is variously styled in the correspondence, did not return to Charleston, as promised. ernor Pickens was received by the commissioners in Washington, making inquiry with regard to Colonel Lamon, and the meaning of the protracted delay to fulfill the promise of evacuation. This was fifident was concerned about the contents of the telegram—there was a point of honor involved; that Lamon had no agency from him, nor title to speak. Letter to Colonel Munford, above cited. This late
e United States Government. We have not oil enough to keep a light in the lantern for one night. The boats will have to, therefore, rely at night entirely upon other marks. I ought to have been informed that this expedition was to come. Colonel Lamon's remark convinced me that the idea, merely hinted at to me by Captain Fox, would not be carried out. The Count of Paris libels the memory of Major Anderson, and perverts the truth of history in this, as he has done in other particulars, bx himself says, in his published letter, I made no arrangements with Major Anderson for supplying the fort, nor did I inform him of my plan; Major Anderson, in the letter above, says the idea had been merely hinted at by Captain Fox, and that Colonel Lamon had led him to believe that it had been abandoned. We shall strive to do our duty, thought I frankly say that my heart is not in this war, which I see is to be thus commenced. That God will still avert it, and cause us to resort to pacif
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