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t Suffolk to notice briefly their gallant conduct during the last six days. On Tuesday General Peck's right was attacked, and the enemy's advance was gallantly met by Colonel Foster's light troops, driving him back to the line of his pickets. Anderson's division was engaged at the same time on the water-front with our gunboats and batteries, and suffered materially. On Wednesday a rebel battery of twenty-pounder rifled guns was effectually silenced, and an attack on the Smith Briggs, an armed quartermaster's boat, was repulsed. Repeated attempts have been made on our lines, but have all been foiled. The storming of the enemy's battery near the west branch of the Nansemond by General Getty and the gunboats, under Lieutenant Lamson, of the navy, and the capture of six guns and two hundred prisoners, closes the operations of the six days against the enemy's large force very satisfactorily. The Eighty-ninth New York and the Eighth Connecticut were the storming party.--See Supplement.
October 11. The English steamer Spaulding was captured by the steam transport Union whilst attempting to run the blockade of Charleston, S. C.--the blockade-running steamer Douro was run ashore and afterward burned by the National gunboat Nansemond, under the command of Lieutenant Lamson.--A battle occurred near Culpeper, Va., the rebels losing four hundred, and the Nationals one hundred and fifty in killed, wounded, and missing.--(Doc. 196.)
October 21. This morning the United States steamer Nansemond, Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, commanding, captured and destroyed the rebel steamer Venus, from Nassau to Wilmington, with a cargo of lead, drugs, clothing, coffee, and bacon for the rebels. The Venus was one of the very finest and fastest steamers engaged in running the blockade. She was two hundred and seventy feet long, one thousand tons burthen, and had the finest engines of any steamer in this trade, and could run sixteen knots per hour. The Nansemond fired one shell through her foremast, another burst in the centre, a third passed through forward, killing one man, (this is the first man killed running the blockade,) and a fourth struck under the guard, near the waterline, knocking in an iron plate, which forced her to run ashore to keep from sinking. She was boarded so quickly that her captain, officers, and most of her crew were captured. As she could not be got off, she was entirely destroyed, under a heavy fi
Doc. 204.-destruction of the Venus. Lieutenant Commanding Lamson's report. United States steamer Nansemond, off New-Inlet, Wilmington, N. C., October 21, 186. sir: I have the honor to report the capture and entire destruction of the blockade-runner Venus, from Nassau to Wilmington, with a cargo of lead, drugs, dry goods, bacon, and coffee. This morning at half-past 12 she attempted to run the blockade, but was discovered by this vessel, and after a short chase overhauled. When heathed completely over with iron. She drew eight feet of water, and when bound out last crossed the bar at low-water, with over six hundred bales of cotton on board. The wrecks of the Hebe, Douro, and Venus are within a short distance of each other. Inclosed is a list of the officers and crew of the Venus, captured before they could escape. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. H. Lamson, Lieutenant Commanding. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
). Britannia, Act. V. Lieut. Samuel Huse (1st attack); Act. V. Lieut. W. A. Sheldon (2d attack). Cherokee, Act. V. Lieut. W. E. Denison. Emma, Act. V. Lieut. T. C. Dunn (1st attack); Act. V. Lieut. J. M. Williams (2d attack). Gettysburg, Lieut. Com. R. H. Lamson (w). Governor Buckingham, Act. V. Lieut. J. McDiarmid. Howquah, Act. V. Lieut. J. W. Balch. Keystone State, Com. H. Rolando. Lilian, Act. V. Lieut. T. A. Harris. Little Ada, Acting Master S. P. Crafts. Moccasin, Act. Ens. James Brown. Na men, Lieut. W. B. Cushing. Nereus, 61 men, Act. Ens. E. G. Dayton. Rhode Island, 47 men, Lieut. F. R. Smith. Santiago de Cuba, 53 men, Lieut. N. H. Farquhar. Vanderbilt, 70 men (estimated), Act. V. Lieut. J. D. Danels. Gettysburg, 71 men, Lieut. R. H. Lamson (w). Tristram Shandy, 22 men, Act. Ens. B. Wood (w). Montgomery, 37 men, Acting Master W. N. Wells. Total, 2261 men. casualties.--The reports of casualties in the first attack, as collated by the Surgeon-General, give the following res
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
made by the Confederates to cross the river and thereby reach Suffolk to attack General Peck. Admiral Lee hastily dispatched two flotillas to hold the line of the river: one composed of the Stepping Stones and seven other gun-boats under Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, in the upper Nansemond, and the other of four gun-boats under Lieutenant William B. Cushing, in the lower waters. Of special importance were the capture on the 19th of April of the battery at Hill's Point, by Lieutenant Lamson's flotilLieutenant Lamson's flotilla, in conjunction with three hundred men under General Getty, and a landing expedition on the 22d to Chuckatuck, several miles inland, under Lieutenant Gushing. After several months of inaction it was decided in August, 1863, to make a reconnoissance up the James River. The force consisted of the monitor Sangamon, the ferry-boat Commodore Barney, and the small steamer Cohasset, all under the command of Captain G. Gansevoort. General Foster accompanied the squadron in an army tug-boat, but
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
sion. Acting-Master Stiles, acting as pilot, was devoted and intelligent in the performance of his duties; and the third-assistant engineer, Missieveer, who attended the bell, was prompt and always correct. Acting-Master S. W. Preston, acting as my flag-lieutenant, displayed throughout the day an undisturbed intelligence and a quick and general observation, which proved very useful. His duties as signal-officer were performed without mistake. This gentleman and the young officers--Mr. R. H. Lamson, Mr. J. P. Robertson and Mr. J. H. Rowland, who were also under my eye, in immediate command of the pivot-guns and spar-deck divisions — sustained the reputation and exhibited the benefits of the Naval Academy, the training of which only could make such valuable officers of such young men. Commander John Rodgers, a passenger in this ship, going to take command of the steamer Flag, volunteered to act upon my staff. It would be difficult for me to enumerate the duties he performed, th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
sion. Acting-Master Stiles, acting as pilot, was devoted and intelligent in the performance of his duties; and the third-assistant engineer, Missieveer, who attended the bell, was prompt and always correct. Acting-Master S. W. Preston, acting as my flag-lieutenant, displayed throughout the day an undisturbed intelligence and a quick and general observation, which proved very useful. His duties as signal-officer were performed without mistake. This gentleman and the young officers--Mr. R. H. Lamson, Mr. J. P. Robertson and Mr. J. H. Rowland, who were also under my eye, in immediate command of the pivot-guns and spar-deck divisions — sustained the reputation and exhibited the benefits of the Naval Academy, the training of which only could make such valuable officers of such young men. Commander John Rodgers, a passenger in this ship, going to take command of the steamer Flag, volunteered to act upon my staff. It would be difficult for me to enumerate the duties he performed, th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
y Nansemond River. gunboats in demand. Lieutenant Lamson distinguishes himself at Hill's Point. avery of officers and men. noble acts. Lieutenant Lamson runs his vessels under enemy's guns. caure of Confederate artillery. commendation of Lamson and Cushing by Secretary Welles. capture and from it, greatly harassed the flotilla. Here Lamson captured a 24-pound howitzer and the sword of I beg to express my most sincere thanks to Captain Lamson, U. S. N., his officers and crews, for the to and approved by me. The conduct of Captain Lamson, his officers and men, was bold and gallan be excelled by the bravest officers. Lieutenant Lamson shows a praiseworthy example by commendiwing communication, which in part repaid Lieutenant Lamson for the hard work he had performed throu not comply with his orders to heave-to, Lieutenant Lamson opened fire upon her. One shot struck hee Crosby, Fleet Captain, July, 1863.--Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, Flag Lieutenant, April, 1863. Ste[19 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
eiser, C. C. Davis and J. W. Saville; Acting-Third-Assistants, David Newell and Dennis Harrington. Steamer; Morse. Lieutenant-Commander, C. A. Babcock; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, (G. F. Winslow; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Russell; Acting-Ensigns, A. Dennett, J. F. Merry and R. M. Wagstaff; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. Dunne; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, Thomas Divine; Acting-Third-Assistants, Timothy Flanders, Thomas McNellis and G. C. Rogers. Steamer Nansemond. Lieutenant, R. H. Lamson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Edgar S. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R. M. Gillette; Acting-Ensigns, J. H. Porter, Wm. Hunter, J. B. Henderson and Henry Waring; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Fred'k Snyder; Acting-Third-Assistants, Edw. Aspald, C. M. Goodwin, J. T. Earl and E. A. Reilly. Steamer Southfield. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Charles A. French; Acting-Masters, W. B. Newman and W. F. Pratt; Acting-Ensigns, T. B. Stokes and J. R. Peacock; Acting-Master's Mates,
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