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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Tired of secession.--The Wheeling Press of February twenty-second says: We learn from a reliable source that the prisoners who were taken at the fight at Bloomery Gap, by Gen. Lander, express a desire to enlist in the Union army. They were sent on Thursday to Camp Chase, and the officer who had a portion of them in command informed us that the privates thus expressed themselves. One of them was asked in Cumberland whether he would prefer the prison or the confederate army. He replied that he would much rather be in prison. The question was then asked: How came you in the secesh army? He replied: I was forced into the army. On being asked by whom, he replied, pointing to Col. Baldwin, his commander: There is the villain that forced me into the rebel service. Such, no doubt, is the feeling of more than one half the private soldiers in the rebel army. Oh! how black the crime of these rebel leaders! How will they ever expiate the guilt that rests upon their heads?
A Provost-Marshal in Trouble.--Some ludicrous incidents are told of the precipitate flight of the rebel Provost-Marshal and Military Board of Hopkinsville on the announcement of the fall of Fort Henry. The rebel postmaster, R. B. Lander, started out on foot, trudging through the deep mud and tremendous torrent of rain to Clarksville. Thos. Bryan, one of the rebel Military Board, went around bidding his secesh friends a final good-by, and crying and blubbering like a spanked child. The Provost-Marshal, Dr. Rowland, however, was the most luckless fellow. He had been particularly tyrannical and insulting to the Union men, and was in the habit of compelling old men to take the oath of allegiance to the Southern Confederacy, before he would give them a pass. On hearing of the rebel reverse, he fled to Clarksville, and took a boat to Nashville; but while on the boat he insulted the clerk, and, about midnight, in a torrent of rain, was set ashore, with his trunks, in the woods, and l
79. Lander. by Thomas Bailey Aldrich. close his bleak eyes — they shall no more Flash victory where the cannon roar; And lay the battered sabre at his side, (His to the last, for so he would have died!) Though he no more may pluck from out its sheath The sinewy lightning that dealt traitors death. Lead the worn war-horse by the plumed bier-- Even his horse, now he is dead, is dear! Take him, New-England, now his work is done. He fought the Good Fight valiantly — and won. Speak of his daring. This man held his blood Cheaper than water for the nation's good. Rich Mountain, Fairfax, Romney — he was there. Speak of him gently, of his mien, his air; How true he was, how his strong heart could bend With sorrow, like a woman's, for a friend: Intolerant of every base desire: Ice where he liked not; where he loved, all fire. Take him, New-England, gently. Other days, Peaceful and prosperous, shall give him praise. How will our children's children breathe his name, Bright on the shadowy <
84. Lander. A warrior to his boyhood's home Is coming back to-day-- Ring out the merry joy-bells wide, Bring flowers to grace his way! Let the cannon's throat and the martial note Send forth a glad acclaim, And the loyal chieftain's welcome home Be worthy of his fame! Hang out the dear old banner where 'Twill meet his flashe soldier's warfare all is done-- Life's wandering marches o'er, God give him rest, among the blest, In heaven for evermore High on the world's heroic list Shall Lander's name be seen, And Time, among “the cherished dead,” Shall keep his memory green! The patriot's heart shall warmer glow When standing by his grave, And dearer stng the blest, In heaven for evermore High on the world's heroic list Shall Lander's name be seen, And Time, among “the cherished dead,” Shall keep his memory green! The patriot's heart shall warmer glow When standing by his grave, And dearer still shall be the flag That Lander died to save. Providence, March 8, 1862. L