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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 286 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 136 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 9 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 95 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 78 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 57 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army. You can also browse the collection for James H. Lane or search for James H. Lane in all documents.

Your search returned 48 results in 4 document sections:

John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter IV (search)
that he be assigned to the District of Kansas, where I permitted him to go, at his own request, to look after his personal interests. General Curtis rebuked me for making such a suggestion, and betrayed my confidence by giving my despatch to James H. Lane, senator from Kansas, and others of Blunt's political friends, thus putting me before the President and the United States Senate in the light of unjust hostility to gallant officers who had just won a great victory over the enemy at Prairie The result of this, and of radical influence in general, was that my nomination as major-general of volunteers, then pending in the Senate, was not confirmed, while both Blunt and Herron were nominated and confirmed as major-generals! Such as Lane and Blunt were the men who so long seemed to control the conduct of military affairs in the West, and whom I found much more formidable enemies than the hostile army in my front. Herron I esteemed a very different man from Blunt, and thought he w
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter V (search)
ony, mayor of this city. This division put General Lane in this dilemma here, that he could not defhe facts stated, from the course pursued by General Lane at Lawrence, and from his speech here, how e United States Senate. Intends to run against Lane. Desires to kill off Ewing, considering him a ected. Carney understands Ewing as supporting Lane, or at least as having withdrawn in Lane's favorney. Carney therefore desires to kill Ewing. Lane finds it to his interest to sustain Ewing so lony other Schofield would be likely to give him. Lane's desire is to remove Schofield and get in his lares as the object of the expedition. . . . Lane was informed that Genl. S. would go to Kansas Cenl. Ewing on the subject. The same evening Genl. Lane made a public speech in Leavenworth, in whice against him. It was held by many of them that Lane had no serious design of entering Missouri; tha from the President or the Secretary of War (to Lane) would aid me much in preventing difficulty. [22 more...]
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter VI (search)
urned from Washington very much crestfallen. It is generally conceded that they have accomplished nothing. Nothing official is yet known on the subject. . . . Lane spoke at Turner's Hall last evening; no disturbance; was silent on the subject of the department commander. He informed me yesterday, through Major Vaughan, that ri the faction which had been friendly to me was also a supporter of Mr. Lincoln, while the radicals were opposed to him. In Kansas, on the contrary, the so-called Lane and Carney factions, while vying with each other in professions of radicalism, were divided in the opposite manner. The former supported the President, but was bicame his reserve. It was very difficult for me to comprehend the political necessity which compelled Mr. Lincoln to give his official countenance to such men as Lane and Blunt in Kansas, but such necessity was thought to exist. I suppose a great statesman should use in the best way he can the worst materials as well as the be
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
Carney's hostility to, 80, 81; friendship with Lane, 80, 81; scheme to expel disloyal persons from Missouri, 37 Kansas City, Mo., S. at, 81-83; Lane agrees, but fails, to meet S. at, 81, 83; internsultation concerning the Chicago riots, 494 Lane, Brig.-Gen. James H., U. S. Senator from Kansastion on Missouri, 79, 81, 83, 84; S. at, 80-82; Lane speaks at, 81; martial law in, 84; a false repoactions toward, 77; requested to remove S., 80; Lane threatens to appeal to, 83; supports freedom ofth at, 337 Morristown, Kan., Gen's Ewing and Lane at, 79 Morristown, Tenn., Longstreet retreat Ga., Hood's movement from, 316 Paola, Kan., Lane's scheme of retaliatory movement from, 81-84 5; organizes Indian regiments, 63; hostility of Lane and Blunt to, 63, 64; opinion of Blunt, 63, 64;policy, 73, 74; troubles in Kansas, 77 et seq.; Lane's hostility to, 80, 81, 83; interviews with Govretaliatory raid from Kansas into Missouri, 97; Lane ceases hostilities against, 99; difficulties in[1 more...]