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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 4 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Lucy Larcom or search for Lucy Larcom in all documents.

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II. enlisting. O, did you see him in the street dressed up in army blue, When drums and trumpets into town their storm of music threw-- A louder tune than all the winds could muster in the air, The Rebel winds that tried so hard our flag in strips to tear? Lucy Larcom. Hardly had the Three months men reached the field before it was discovered that a mistake had been made in not calling out a larger number of troops, and for longer service;--it took a long time to realize what a gigantic rebellion we had on our hands. So on the 3d of May President Lincon issued a call for United States volunteers to serve three years, unless sooner discharged. At once thousands of loyal men sprang to arms — so large a number, in fact, that many regiments raised were refused until later. The methods by which these regiments were raised were various. In 1861 a common way was for some one who had been in the regular army, or perhaps who had been prominent in the militia, to take the initiati
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, X. Raw recruits. (search)
X. Raw recruits. She asked for men, and up he spoke, my handsome and hearty Sam, “I'll die for the dear old Union, if she'll take me as I am ”: And if a better man than he there's mother that can show, From Maine to Minnesota, then let the people know. Lucy Larcom. Many facts bearing upon the subject of this sketch have been already presented in the opening chapter, but much more remains to be told, and the reader will pardon me, I trust, for now injecting a little bit of personal history to illustrate what thousands of young men were doing at that time, and had been doing for months, as it leads up directly to the theme about to be considered. After I had obtained the reluctant consent of my father to enlist,--my mother never gave hers,--the next step hecessary was to make selection of the organization with which to identify my fortunes. I well remember the to me eventful August evening when that decision to enlist was arrived at. The Union army, then under McClellan, had