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The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 2 0 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
ch injury, that it had to retire for repairs. Several blockade-runners between this and Williamsburg were arrested and sent to Gen. Winder to-day by Lieut. G. D. Wise. Gen. W. sent them to Gen. Rains. Mr. Petit and Mr. James Custis (from Williamsburg) came with them to endeavor to procure their liberation. Gen. Rains sent them back to Gen. W., with a note that he had no time to attend to such matters. Such business does not pertain to his bureau. I suppose they will be released. Major Lear, of Texas, who was at the capture of the Harriet Lane, met on the captured steamer his mortally-wounded son, the lieutenant. A few days ago, Lieut. Buchanan was killed on a United States gun-boat by our sharpshooters. He was the son of Admiral Buchanan, in the Confederate service, now at Mobile. Thus we are reminded of the wars of the roses-father against son, and brother against brother. God speed the growth of the Peace Party, North and South; but we must have independence. Mr
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xlvii. (search)
emed that Hay, or John, as the President called him, had met with a singular adventure, which was the subject of the amusement. Glancing through the half-open door, Mr. Lincoln caught sight of me, and the story had to be repeated for my benefit. The incident was trifling in itself, but the President's enjoyment of it was very exhilarating. I never saw him in so frolicsome a mood as on this occasion. It has been well said by a critic of Shakspeare, that the spirit which held the woe of Lear, and the tragedy of Hamlet, would have broken, had it not also had the humor of the Merry Wives of Windsor, and the merriment of Midsummer Night's Dream. With equal justice can this profound truth be applied to the late President. The world has had no better illustration of it since the immortal plays were written. Mr. Lincoln's laugh stood by itself. The neigh of a wild horse on his native prairie is not more undisguised and hearty. A group of gentlemen, among whom was his old Sprin
taff: Col., Miller; Lieut.-Col., Straub; Quartermaster, Linton; Paymaster, Davis; Adjutant, Hatch; Surgeon, Woolston; Assistant Surgeon, Satterthwaith. Company A. Cook Rifles, Captain Perine, Bordentown. Company B, Captain Gale. Company C, Stockton Cadets, Captain Jackson; Company D, Gloucester Guard, Capt. Stratford. Company E, Camden Artillery, Capt. Mickle. Company F, (flag company,) Camden Zouaves, Captain Hunt. Company G, Cook Rifles, Captain Cunningham. Company H, Anderson Guards, Captain Lear. Company I, Johnson Guards, Salem, Captain Dinneghson. Company K, Marion Rifles, Captain Burling. The whole brigade, with its four pieces of artillery, arrived at Annapolis on Sunday, May 5th, in twenty-eight hours from Trenton, and proceeded direct for Washington. It is stated that the fourteen transports, with a strong convoy, Commander F. R. Loper, made a splendid appearance, steaming in two lines down the Chesapeake. They had been greeted by a great Union demonstration as they pa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 4: Longfellow (search)
e criticisms, still remembered in Cambridge, which were made upon Mr. Longfellow's youthful taste for becoming costume. He was undoubtedly thinking of himself when in Hyperion he made the Baron say to Paul Fleming, The ladies already begin to call you Wilhelm Meister, and they say that your gloves are a shade too light for a strictly virtuous man. He perhaps also thought of it when he wrote to Sumner, then in Europe, If you have any tendency to curl your hair and wear gloves, like Edgar in Lear, do it before your return. Even Mrs. Craigie, it is said, thought that he had somewhat too gay a look. Life of Longfellow by his brother, I. p. 246. He was viewed, it must be remembered, against a background of Harvard professors, whose costume did not in those days — if even now it does — savor of splendor. It was also a period of much gayer waistcoats than now and of great amplitude of cravats. The criticism of Longfellow's own toilet had an especial biographical interest in the pec
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
talk of art and literature and Rome. Ever most sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Felton, at whose desk I now write, sends his regards to you. To George W. Greene. Boston, Aug. 17, 1843. dear, dear Greene,—On my return, last evening, from a bridal tour with Longfellow and his wife, I was surprised and gratified by your letter. Mr. Greene was at home on leave of absence from his Consulate. I cannot believe that you are so near us. The feet of your coming, like those of Lear's horses, have been shod with felt. You will find dear Longfellow married to the beautiful and most lovely Mary Ashburton. They were married July 13. They will rejoice to see you. They still linger among her friends in Berkshire till Saturday, Aug. 19, when they will return to Cambridge, where she will commence her life as Professorin. As for me, I am as much alone, and altogether as poor a creature, as when we enjoyed together the hospitality of the monks of the Alban Lake. If you can
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
rd 241 Beacon Street, December 22, 1881. Dearest Brother, . . . Your house, darling, was bright and lovely, yesterday. I had my old pet, Edwin Booth, to lunchwe were nine at table, the poet Aldrich disappointing us. From three to four we had a reception for Mr. Booth, quite the creme de la creme, I assure you. Among others, Dr. Holmes came. The rooms and furniture were much admired. We gave only tea at the levee, but had some of your good wine at the luncheon. P. S. Mr. Booth in Lear last night was sublime! To the same Edwin Booth had sent us his box for the evening. The play was Hamlet, the performance masterly. People's tastes about plays differ, but I am sure that no one on the boards can begin to do what Booth does. I saw him for a moment after the play, and he told me that he had done his best for me. Somehow, I thought that he was doing his very best, but did not suppose that he was thinking of me particularly ... January 29, 1882. Frank [Marion Crawfor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, Snow (search)
hemlocks, which stand, white in their soft raiment, around the dais of this woodland pond! Are they held here, like the sovereigns in the palace of the Sleeping Beauty, till some mortal breaks their spell? What sage counsels must be theirs, as they nod their weary heads and whisper ghostly memories and old men's tales to each other, while the red leaves dance on the snowy sward below, or a fox or squirrel steals hurriedly through the wild and wintry night! Here and there is some discrowned Lear, who has thrown off his regal mantle, and stands in faded russet, misplaced among the monarchs. What a simple and stately hospitality is that of Nature in winter! The season which the residents of cities think an obstruction gives in the country an extension of intercourse: it opens every forest from here to Labrador, free of entrance; the most tangled thicket, the most treacherous marsh, becomes passable; and the lumberer or moose-hunter, mounted on his snow-shoes, has the world before h
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVI (search)
d on his heart and despair in his eyes; to paint the hand anatomically correct, the eyes deep in emotion; but we need to know what brought him there; what produced the strange combination, a Puritan Saint with a conscience wrung into distortion. Lear is not Lear, Hamlet not Hamlet, without a glimpse at the conditions that have made them what they are. With the worst villains of the play, we need, as Margaret Fuller profoundly said, to hear the excuses men make to themselves for their worthlessLear, Hamlet not Hamlet, without a glimpse at the conditions that have made them what they are. With the worst villains of the play, we need, as Margaret Fuller profoundly said, to hear the excuses men make to themselves for their worthlessness. But these conditions, these excuses, constitute the plot. It is easy enough to dismiss plot from the scene, if it means only a conundrum like that in The Dead Secret, or a series of riddles like the French detective novels. In these the story is all, there is no character worth unravelling; and when we have once got at the secret the book is thrown away. But where the plot is a profound study of the development of character, it can never be thrown away; and unless we have it, the cha
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 12: voices of the night (search)
ord no surprise. His brother tells us that good Mrs. Craigie thought he had somewhat too gay a look, and had a fondness for colors in coats, waistcoats, and neckties. It will be remembered that in Hyperion he makes the Baron say to Paul Flemming, The ladies already begin to call you Wilhelm Meister, and they say that your gloves are a shade too light for a strictly virtuous man. He wrote also to Sumner when in Europe: If you have any tendency to curl your hair and wear gloves like Edgar in Lear, do it before your return. It is a curious fact that he wrote of himself about the same time to his friend, George W. Greene, in Rome: Most of the time am alone; smoke a good deal; wear a broad-brimmed hat, black frock coat, a black cane. Life, i. 256, 304. Of the warmth of heart which lay beneath this perhaps worldly exterior, the following letter to his youthful sister-in-law gives evidence:— Friday evening [1837]. My good, dear Madge,— you do not know how sorry I am, that I ca
resident on Wednesday nominated to the Senate Edward M. Stanton, as Attorney General of the United States. The Roman Catholic Bishop of Monterey, Mexico, is in New York. He preached at St. Francis Xavier's church on Sunday. There have been 346 wells sunk in the Pennsylvania oil region, only 29 of which are profitable. David Caution, convicted at Louisville of an outrage on the person of Miss C. Swanson, is to be hung on the 25th of January. "I shall be indebted to you for life," as the man said to his creditors when he ran away to Australia. A love-sick young man, who has taken very much of late to writing sonnets, has just hung himself with one of his own lines. A wife's farewell to her husband every morning--"Buy, buy." Prof. Samuel Ellot has been elected President of Trinity College. A New York critic says the grimmest of smiles is Edwin Forrest's "Lear." Lieut. Geo. E. Law and Assistant Surgeon Thos. J. Charlton, S. N. have resigned.
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