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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
the Dey of Algiers an annual tribute for the relief of captured seamen. according to long usage among European nations. It was humiliating, but nothing better could then be done. and humanity demanded it. In 1812 the Dey. offended because he had not received from the American government the annual tribute in precisely such articles as he wanted, dismissed the American consul, declared war, and his corsairs captured American vessels and reduced the crews to slavery. The American consul--Mr. Lear--was compelled to pay the Dey $27,000 for the security of himself and family and a few other Americans there from horrid slavery. Determined to pay tribute no longer to the insolent semi-barbarian, the American government accepted the Dey's challenge for war, and in May, 1815, sent Commodore Decatur to the Mediterranean with a squadron to humble the Dey. Decatur found the Algerine pirate-fleet cruising for American vessels. He played havoc with the corsairs, entered the Bay of Algiers (Ju
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lear, Tobias 1762- (search)
Lear, Tobias 1762- Diplomatist; born in Portsmouth, N. H., Sept. 19, 1762; graduated at Harvard in 1783, and became private secretary to Washington in 1785. The latter remembered Mr. Lear liberally in his will. In 1801 he was American consul-general in Santo Domingo, and from 1804 to 1812 held the same office at Algiers. d became private secretary to Washington in 1785. The latter remembered Mr. Lear liberally in his will. In 1801 he was American consul-general in Santo Domingo, and from 1804 to 1812 held the same office at Algiers. Mr. Lear was an accountant in the War Department at the time of his death, in Washington, D. C., Oct. 10, 1816.d became private secretary to Washington in 1785. The latter remembered Mr. Lear liberally in his will. In 1801 he was American consul-general in Santo Domingo, and from 1804 to 1812 held the same office at Algiers. Mr. Lear was an accountant in the War Department at the time of his death, in Washington, D. C., Oct. 10, 1816.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tripoli, War with (search)
Hamet had taken refuge with the Viceroy of Egypt. There Eaton joined him with a few troops composed of men of all nations, and, marching westward across Northern Africa 1,000 miles, with transportation consisting of 190 camels, on April 27, 1805, captured the Tripolitan seaport town of Derne. They fought their way successfully towards the capital, their followers continually increasing, when, to the mortification of Eaton and the extinguishment of the hopes of Caramelli, they found that Tobias Lear, the American consul-general, had made a treaty of peace (June 4, 1805) with the terrified ruler of Tripoli. So ended the war. The ruler of Tunis was yet insolent, but his pride was suddenly humbled by the appearance of a squadron of thirteen vessels under Commodore Rodgers, who succeeded Barron, and he sent an ambassador to the United States. The Barbary States now all feared the power of the Americans. and commerce in the Mediterranean Sea was relieved of great peril. Pope Pius VII.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, George (search)
ious services in all the churches, and prayers put up for the blessing of Heaven on the new government. At twelve o'clock the city troops paraded before Washington's door, and soon after the committees of Congress and heads of departments came in their carriages. At half-past 12 the procession moved forward preceded by the troops; next came the committees and heads of departments in their carriages; then Washington in a coach of state, his aide-de-camp Colonel Humphreys, and his secretary Mr. Lear in his own carriage. The foreign ministers and a long train of citizens brought up the rear. About 200 yards before reaching the ball, Washington and his suite alighted from their carriages, and passed through the troops, who were drawn up on each side, into the hall and Senate chamber, where the Vice-President, the Senate, and House of Representatives were assembled. The Vice-President, John Adams, recently inaugurated, advanced and conducted Federal Hall, New York, where Washingto