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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Kilpatrick's and Dahlgren's raid to Richmond. (search)
nt, n for several hours, Kilpatriek mean-while awaiting signs of the approach of Dahlgren. The latter officer, on separating from the main body below Spotsylvania, moving south-westerly, had, before noon of the 29th, struck and broken the Virginia Central Railroad a little east of Frederick's Hall Station, capturing a detachment of Maryland artillerymen and also about a dozen commissioned officers, who were holding a court-martial. At Frederick's Hall Station were eighty or more pieces of Lee's reserve artillery, and the news that it was exposed to attack created some excitement in Richmond; but Colonel Dahlgren's information and purposes determined him not to risk an attack on the artillery camp. At night he crossed the South Anna, and early the next morning reached the James River canal, about eight miles east of Goochland. There he directed Captain J. F. B. Mitchell to take the detachment of one hundred men of the 2d New York, and, proceeding down the canal, to destroy locks
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
to which he seems to have given credence, that Lee's men were in confusion after this attack, and of another attack from Lee in the Wilderness. Lee had evidently won the respect of his foes when,l Lee, The news of Stuart's fall reached General Lee on the 12th.--C. S. V. who prized him highlfore dawn raged the fiercest battle of the war. Lee's position during the day was near Early's linehe artillery when it broke Burnside's assault. Lee was present dictating notes and orders in the mmen marched steadily on until they noticed that Lee at their head was riding across a space swept bon the 21st. General Grant arrived on the 23d. Lee would gladly have compelled battle in his positpulses of their repeated attacks on our lines. Lee had drawn Pickett and Breckinridge to him. But rom the field. But Lee ill in his tent was not Lee at the front. He was much disappointed in not m May 30th to June 2d were anxious ones for General Lee. For while General Grant had easy and safe[20 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
ith the Naval Battalion, under Commodore [John R.] Tucker, behind his right. Kershaw's division was on the right. All of Lee's and part of Kershaw's divisions were posted behind a rising ground that afforded some shelter from artillery. The creekvent useless loss of life, though I gave no orders, being a prisoner. Before the messenger reached him General [G. W. C.] Lee had been captured, as had General Kershaw, and the whole of my command. My two divisions numbered about 3000 each at tileal J. Warren Keifer, in a pamphlet on the battle of Sailor's Creek, says: General A. P. Hill, a corps commander in General Lee's army, was killed at Petersburg, April 2d, 1865, and this, or some other important reason, caused General Lee, while General Lee, while at Amelia Court House, to consolidate his army into two corps or wings, one commanded by Lieutenant-General Longstreet and the other by Lieutenant-General Ewell. The main body of the Confederate army had passed by toward Sailor's Creek. Pursuit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Warren at five Forks, and the court of inquiry. (search)
ie Court House. One of my divisions was thus compelled to march all night, after having fought all day, and the rest of the corps moved toward the enemy that confronted the cavalry at daybreak. Our presence on the flank and rear of the enemy compelled him to fall back rapidly to the vicinity of the Five Forks, and General Sheridan, on advancing with the cavalry, found him slightly intrenched there. This force proved to be a complete division of the enemy's infantry, and all the cavalry of Lee's army. I received an order from General Meade, after joining General Sheridan, to report to him for duty, which I did, and the corps was halted by his direction at the point where we joined him, about 8 A. M. [April 1st]. At 1 P. M. I was directed to bring up the corps to Gravelly Run Church, a distance of about two and three-fourths miles from where they had been halted, and there form with two divisions in front and one in reserve, so as to move with the whole corps, and attack and turn
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Lee's report of the surrender at Appomattox. (search)
Lee's report of the surrender at Appomattox. On the 12th of April, 1865, from Near Appomattox Court House, General R. E. Lee made the following report to Mr. Davis: Mr. President: It is with pain that I announce to Your Excellency the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. The operations which preceded this result will be reported in full. I will therefore only now state that upon arriving at Amelia Court House on the morning of the 4th with the advance of the army, on the retreat from the lines in front of Richmond and Petersburg, and not finding the supplies ordered to be placed there, nearly twenty-four hours were lost in endeavoring to collect in the country subsistence for men and horses. This delay was fatal, and could not be retrieved. The troops, wearied by continual fighting and marching for several days and nights, obtained neither rest nor refreshment, and on moving on the 5th, on the Richmond and Danville railroad, I found at Jetersville the enemy's caval