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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.12 (search)
I have a right to speak of him. Can I or any one else do justice to his many exploits as commander of the cavalry of the historic Army of Northern Virginia? Is it necessary to tell you that his ride around McClellan's army, on the Richmond lines, was not undertaken to gain eclat by the popular applause it might bring him, but it was made to locate the flanks of the Federal army — to blaze the way for the great Stonewall Jackson, whose memory has been so vividly recalled to us, and whom General Lee was planning to bring down upon the right and rear of McClellan, and wanted to know where it was located. I commanded a regiment upon that expedition, and know that after Stuart found himself in rear of the Federal right, his own grand genius taught him to make the circuit — the entire circuit of the Federal army — as the easiest way to avoid the dispositions that were being made to cut him off, should he return the way he marched. Must I tell you of his trip to Catlett's, in Pope's r<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
t opposition by the road from Port Royal to Pocotaligo. Such was the state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about the first of December, 1861, to assume the command of the departmen, regained their confidence, and with it their energy. Having received orders to report to General Lee, I joined him in December, a few days after he had assumed command of the Department, and wasey, who commanded at Charleston, and General Lawton, the commander at Savannah, ably seconded General Lee in the execution of his plans, while Generals Evans, Drayton and Mercer assisted him at otherr, Fort Pulaski, after striking a blow for honor, surrendered with about five hundred men. General Lee received an order about the middle of March assigning him to duty in Richmond, in obedience t the Southern States a feeling of security and confidence. We perceive in this campaign of General Lee in Georgia and South Carolina results achieved by a single genius equal to those which could
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
isons to die, in order that they might fire the Northern heart with stories of Rebel barbarities. 7. But the charge of cruelty made against the Confederate leaders is triumphantly refuted by such facts as these: The official reports of Secretary Stanton and Surgeon-General Barnes show that a much larger per cent. of Confederates perished in Northern prisons than of Federals in Southern prisons. And though the most persistent efforts were made to get up a case against President Davis, General Lee and others (even to the extent of offering poor Wirz a reprieve if he would implicate them), they were not able to secure testimony upon which even Holt and his military court dared to go into the trial. We have a large mass of documents on this subject, and the Secretary has been busy compiling them. But it is earnestly requested that any of our friends who have facts and figures bearing on the question in any of its branches, which they are willing to give (or lend) to the Society,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
s perished in Northern prisons than of Federals in Southern prisons. And though the most persistent efforts were made to get up a case against President Davis, General Lee, and others (even to the extent of offering poor Wirz a reprieve if he would implicate them), they were not able to secure testimony upon which even Holt and his, as to all previous appeals, a deaf ear was turned. The interview was not granted. I will not attempt, from memory, to write the details of the correspondence. Lee no longer lives to defend the cause and country he loved so well and served so efficiently; but General Grant cannot fail to remember so extraordinary a proposition Federal authorities, and they prove, beyond the shadow of a doubt, every point which he makes. If it be replied to the above testimony that President Davis, General Lee, Vice-President Stevens and Judge Ould were all criminals in this matter, and that their testimony is thereby invalidated, we will not pause to defend these hig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Statement of General J. D. Imboden. (search)
the food question, and found that no discrimination was made in the issue of rations to guards and prisoners. In quantity, quality and kind the daily supply was exactly the same, man for man. It is true it was very scanty, consisting of a third or half a pound of meat a day, and usually a pint or pint and a half of corn meal, with salt. Occasionally there were small supplies of wheat flour, and sometimes a very few potatoes, but they were rarely to be had. Other vegetables we had none. General Lee's army in Virginia lived but little if any better. The food was sound and wholesome, but meagre in quantity, and not such in kind and variety as Federal soldiers had been accustomed to draw from their abundant commissariat. Our soldiers did very well on hog and hominy, and rarely complained. The Federals thought it horrible to have nothing else, and but a scanty supply of this simple food. Great scoundrelism was detected amongst the prisoners in cheating each other. They were organiz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
rom some of the Federal officers during my imprisonment, and especially from a Major Lee, who succeeded Colonel Hill at Johnson's Island. He had lost an arm I thinkfederates not held a large excess of prisoners. The following Letter from General Lee clearly sets forth the points at issue: [Copy.]headquarters army is very manifest that that order was issued for the purpose of embarrassing General Lee's army with the guarding and feeding of the prisoners, amounting to several nd in consequence of the order, information of which reached us immediately, General Lee sent a flag of truce to Meade on the 4th of July, after the close of the batn his order is among the laws and usages of war, then it must follow that if General Lee had not been able to guard or feed the prisoners in his hands he would have were in a position to refuse even an audience to the Rebel commissioner. General Lee's overtures to General Grant and to the Federal Government (through the Unit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
which a more rigid study of the official reports would have avoided; but the account given of General Lee's private character and domestic life is exceedingly pleasing and very valuable. We are glad of course, give an unbiased judgment of this book. But we may say this, that the letters of General Lee, which the author was so fortunate as to secure, are among the most charming specimens of letok widely circulated — more especially as a part of every copy sold goes into the treasury of the Lee memorial Association at Lexington. We may add that the steel engravings of General Lee and MrsGeneral Lee and Mrs. Lee in this book are the best likenesses of them we have ever seen, and that the publishers have gotten up the volume in superb style. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. D. Appleton & Co.Mrs. Lee in this book are the best likenesses of them we have ever seen, and that the publishers have gotten up the volume in superb style. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. D. Appleton & Co., New York. General Johnston wields one of the most graceful, trenchant pens of any man who figured in the late war, and whatever difference of opinion may honestly exist concerning controverted p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
e been so. There may have been a brigade in General Lee's army nine thousand strong, but in speakinon as comprising the 15,000 men that joined General Lee after the battle of Seven Pines. These blmes. In fact I have seen an estimate of General Lee's forces in the Seven Days battles, based uhad commanded General Holmes told me in General Lee's presence, just before the fight began on rt to discredit my statements indicate that General Lee had little object in the delay, or accompliAnd, besides, it is not to be supposed that General Lee permitted two such unwieldy bodies to remaiof General Holmes', reached Richmond before General Lee commanded. According to this our zealous ag to the obnoxious passage in my narrative, General Lee made that delay advantageous to us by greatism by the London Times of the biography of General Lee by Mr. Childe, of Paris, that paper, while ondition of the country; and I do know that General Lee did all for the success of our cause that i[21 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
o be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kind enough to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost exactly with the course you have advised me to pursue. He agrees with you that it would be impossible for us to raise a force at this time sufficiently strong to resist the large bodies of troops in the S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
in plaster, and will soon make them seem to breathe and speak in the pure marble. And we are exceedingly fortunate in having at the South an artist whose busts of Lee, Jackson, Stuart, Maury, Johnston, and others of our great leaders, display genius of the highest order, whose recumbent figure of Lee has scarcely an equal and no Lee has scarcely an equal and no superior in any work of art in this country, and whose studio has become a Mecca for all true Confederates. May Valentine be spared to complete, and may Southern patriotism enable him to complete, many more such works, which shall hand down to posterity the form and features of our noble leaders. Contributions to the archif the London Index, from May 1st 1862, to August 12th 1865. E. V. Fox, Esq.--Fox's mission to Russia in 1866. Mrs. Henry Pye, Richmond, Virginia.--Mss. of General Lee's final and full Report of the Pennsylvania Campaign (dated January 1864), copied by Michael Kelly, Clerk to General S. Cooper. R. S. Hollins, Baltimore, Mar