Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Richard Henry Lee or search for Richard Henry Lee in all documents.

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us designs of those turbulent and seditious per sons, who, under false pretences, have but too success- Chap. XXXVIII} 1768. Nov. fully deluded numbers of my subjects in America. In the House of Commons Lord Henly, Arthur Lee in Life of R. H. Lee, 261, 262. The Letter is dated erroneously, Oct. 9, for Nov. 9, 1768. I have several reports of this debate. Cavendish, i. 32, &c. William S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 18 November, 1768. son of Northington, in moving the Address, signalized thnged to himself and spoke in opposition to enhance his price, declaimed against governing by files of musketeers and terror; and he, too, condemned the Ministerial mandate as illegal. Arthur Lee's Report of the Debate, in Appendix to Life of R. H. Lee, 262. W. S. Johnson to W. Pitkin, 18 Nov. 1768; and W. S. Johnson's Diary, for 8 Nov. 1768, Cavendish Debates. Though it were considered wiser, said Rigby, to alter the American tax, than to continue it, I would not alter it, so long as the Col
t to import any slaves, nor purchase any imported. These associations were signed by Peyton Randolph, Richard Bland, Archibald Cary, Robert Carter Nicholas, Richard Henry Lee, Washington, Carter Braxton, Henry, Jefferson, Nelson, and all the Burgesses of Virginia there assembled; Burk's History of Virginia, III. 348, 349. and ws merchants their approval of what had been done. Delaware did still better. Her Assembly adopted the Virginia Resolves word for word, John Dickinson to Richard Henry Lee, 22 June, 1769. Life of R. H. Lee, i. 76, 77. Francis Alison to Ezra Stiles, 1 August, 1769. and every Colony South of Virginia in due time followed the exants their approval of what had been done. Delaware did still better. Her Assembly adopted the Virginia Resolves word for word, John Dickinson to Richard Henry Lee, 22 June, 1769. Life of R. H. Lee, i. 76, 77. Francis Alison to Ezra Stiles, 1 August, 1769. and every Colony South of Virginia in due time followed the example.
restrain the introduction of people, the number of whom already in the Colony, gave them just cause to apprehend the most dangerous consequences, and therefore made it necessary that they should fall upon means not only of preventing their increase, but also of lessening their number. The interest of the country, it was said, manifestly requires the total expulsion of them. Dunmore to Hillsborough, 1 May, 1772. Anthony Benezet to Granville Sharp, 14 May, 1772. Jefferson, like Richard Henry Lee, had begun his legislative career by efforts for emancipation. To the Chap. XLVII.} 1772. April. mind of Patrick Henry, the thought of slavery darkened the picture of the future, even while he cherished faith in the ultimate abolition of an evil, which, though the law sanctioned, religion opposed. Compare Patrick Henry to Anthony Benezet, 18 Jan. 1773; in Robert Vaux's Life of Benezet. To have approached Parliament with a Petition against the Slave-Trade might have seemed a reco
edings of the Town of Boston for organizing the provincial Committees of Correspondence to Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. The letter of Cushing seems to be lost; its purport appears from the unpublished answer of R. H. Lee to T. Gushing, Lee Hall, Potomack Virginia, 13 Feb. 1773. The Governor, in his Speech to the two Houses, with calculating malice summoned them to admit or disprove the nies, America would stand before the world as a Confederacy. The measure was supported by Richard Henry Lee, with an eloquence which ever passed away from the memory of his hearers; by Patrick Henry, and unanimously adopted. They appointed their Committee on which appear the names of Bland and Lee, of Henry, and Carr, and Jefferson. Their Resolves were sent to every Colony, with a request tha the hope, that the fire of Liberty would spread through the Continent. Samuel Adams to Richard Henry Lee, 9 April, 1773. A Congress and then an Assembly of States, reasoned Samuel Adams, is no lo