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The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
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The difference. --When Gen. Lee's army was in Pennsylvania the moderation of the invaders, and, in particular, their courteous and respectful demeanor towards women, were acknowledged and dilated on even by the pensioned correspondents of the Yankee press. The manly and humane address of General Early at York to the women of that section contained no promise of protection which it did not literally fulfill. No single soldier of the Confederate army has ever been accused of the slightest act of disrespect, much less of wrong and outrage, to a woman. Now, mark the difference! The army of Lee returns to Virginia, the army of Meade once more invades our soil, and the first acknowledgment we receive of the honorable and manly deportment of our own chivalric soldiers towards females, is a series of the most brutal outrages upon ladies in Loudoun county which have ever disgraced the annals of war! And we are told that the worst of such cases never see the light! We have heard
rom Lawrence. Miscellaneous. A dispatch, dated Washington the 25th, says that information of the most reliable character, from parties who have very recently passed along the whole route from Richmond to Culpeper Court-House, show that Gen. Lee's army is at present about 60,000 strong. Lee's headquarters are within a few miles of the Court-House. Hill's and Ewell's corps are in that vicinity, Long street's is at Fredericksburg, and Stuart's cavalry guarding the various fords of the RLee's headquarters are within a few miles of the Court-House. Hill's and Ewell's corps are in that vicinity, Long street's is at Fredericksburg, and Stuart's cavalry guarding the various fords of the Rappahannock. The United States sloop-of-war Bainbridge is reported to have foundered at sea, with the loss of all her officers and crew, excepting one colored man, who was picked up at sea by the brig South Boston, which has arrived at Philadelphia. This man states that the Bainbridge foundered on the 21st, during a violent gale. One other man escaped on the boat, but subsequently went crazy and jumped overboard. The Bainbridge left New York on the 18th for Port Royal, where she was to
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1863., [Electronic resource], The great Yankee railroad raid in Mississippi--how it was executed. (search)
were leaping high in the air from store-houses groaning beneath the weight of Government stores. Fifteen miles from the scene the blood-red light of the conflagration still gleamed in the sorrowful eyes of the observers. Not before to-day has Gen. Lee been able to concentrate his cavalry and threaten the vandals. Ferguson should have been within striking distance yesterday, but his command will prove unable to cope with such a force as the enemy has. Thus, it will be seen that they have had but his command will prove unable to cope with such a force as the enemy has. Thus, it will be seen that they have had three uninterrupted days to complete the work of demolition. Gen. Steepen D. Lee should receive no coinsure for this disgraceful affair, since he only assumed command of the cavalry forces on the 17th, and had not yet had time to get them fully in command. In fact, cavalry was not adequate to the important charge, and infantry should have been held for its protection.
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1863., [Electronic resource], From the Peninsula — the great raid. (search)
I will pay $50 for the delivery of my woman Hester (sometimes Easter) to Messrs. Lee & James, auctioneers. She is 40 or 45 years old, about 5 feet high, brown skin, good teeth, not very stout. She may be found about Dover Mils, Goochland county, or in Richmond, trading to some of the camps near. H F Cocke. au 25--cod3t