Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Lee or search for Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource], Affairs at Vicksburg--Gen. Pemberton. (search)
n his lot with the North, there were not wanting men ungenerous enough to impute his Northern birth to him as a crime, and to "foretell" that upon the first opportunity he would prove a traitor to the cause he had espoused at so great a cost. General Lee strongly recommended him to Jefferson Davis, Jefferson Davis gave him high rank and important employment upon the recommendation of Gen. Lee. Joseph E. Johnston desired to have him for chief of his staff. Beauregard declared that there was noGen. Lee. Joseph E. Johnston desired to have him for chief of his staff. Beauregard declared that there was not a truer man or a braver soldier in the Confederate service. All would not do. He was still the object of unceasing censure, and when he was commanding at Charleston the firmness of President Davis alone prevented him from falling a sacrifice to the inveteracy of his malingers. We could never understand what occasioned this storm of hatred, except his Northern birth, the strict discipline he kept up in his camp, and his having said, or been reported to say, that if the enemy attacked Charlest
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource], Affairs at Vicksburg--Gen. Pemberton. (search)
Another victory at Vicksburg. desperate Amanit on our work — Terrible repulse of Grant's army — heavy Lee of the Federal,&c. Jackson June 22. --On Saturday morning at 2 o'clock, the enemy made a furious assault upon our lines near Vicksburg. The action lasted until ten o'clock, ending in a complete rout of the enemy. Citizens from the neighborhood report that the fire of musketry exceeded anything ever heard. The loss of the enemy is greater than in any other attack. Nothing whatever is known in regard to our loss, but it is certain that another great victory has been gained. Passengers from Grenada report that the Yankee raiders have gone back. [Second Dispatch] Jackson, June 22. --The special correspondent of the Mississippian estimates the loss of the enemy on Saturday at 10,000; also, that the enemy are throwing pontoons across the Big Black, between the railroad bridge and Baldwin's Ferry, near Warrenton. It is reported that our
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource], Federal opinion of Gen. Lee's movements. (search)
Federal opinion of Gen. Lee's movements. --The New York Times of the 17th, has the following speculations as to Lee's movements: It is altogether likely that Lee will move very rapidly in the execution of his plan, whatever it may be. He known already that Pennsylvania and the whole North are rallying to drive him back,Lee's movements: It is altogether likely that Lee will move very rapidly in the execution of his plan, whatever it may be. He known already that Pennsylvania and the whole North are rallying to drive him back, and he knew before he advanced that they would do so. He knows that Hooker will become stronger every day, and that every day will also add immensely to the strength of any position that Hooker may take up. He knows that every day he remains in the North Richmond is put in the most imminent peril from an advance of our troops statLee will move very rapidly in the execution of his plan, whatever it may be. He known already that Pennsylvania and the whole North are rallying to drive him back, and he knew before he advanced that they would do so. He knows that Hooker will become stronger every day, and that every day will also add immensely to the strength of any position that Hooker may take up. He knows that every day he remains in the North Richmond is put in the most imminent peril from an advance of our troops stationed on the Peninsula and at Suffolk. He knows that a Northern campaign, lasting even as long as months, is impossible. He will be likely, therefore, to strike out very quickly and with his whole force. If it is invasion in force, we shall have it this week. If it is a battle with Hooker, it will not be delayed. If it is an a
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource], From the Northern Border--reported fighting on the Potomac. (search)
ce and crossed the river on Sunday morning. We think it altogether likely that the report of a heavy engagement has originated in the series of brilliant fights which General Stuart has had with the enemy, in all which we have every reason to believe he has been more than usually successful. With reference to these fights, and the condition of our army, we give the following extract from a letter written by a member of the 10th Virginia cavalry to a friend in this city, and dated on Saturday last. The writer says: "Since Thursday we have been constantly skirmishing with the enemy — always successfully. We have taken numbers of prisoners and horses. The latter do us much the most good every way. "I hardly know whether you would enjoy it or not, but I wish you could see Gen. Lee's noble army in motion, and I have within a few days past. Never was there a more finely organized body of men in the world. The men are all in splendid spirits. There is no straggling."