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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor (search)
ez, zigzags around the mountainside and was defended at every turn by artillery. On either side were deep chasms or mountain walls. A direct attack along the road was an impossibility. A flank movement seemed equally impossible. After the arrival of the commanding-general upon the scene, reconnaissances were sent out to find, or to make, a road by which the rear of the enemy's works might be reached without a front attack. These reconnaissances were made under the supervision of Captain Robert E. Lee, assisted by Lieutenants P. G. T. Beauregard, Isaac I. Stevens, Z. B. Tower, G. W. Smith, George B. McClellan, and J. G. Foster, of the corps of engineers, all officers who attained rank and fame, on one side or the other, in the great conflict for the preservation of the unity of the nation. The reconnaissance was completed, and the labor of cutting out and making roads by the flank of the enemy was effected by the 17th of the month. This was accomplished without the knowledge of
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on the City of Mexico-battle of Contreras-assault at Churubusco-negotiations for peace-battle of Molino del Rey-storming of Chapultepec-San Cosme-evacuation of the City-Halls of the Montezumas (search)
The gun was carried to the belfry and put together. We were not more than two or three hundred yards from San Cosme. The shots from our little gun dropped in upon the enemy and created great confusion. Why they did not send out a small party and capture us, I do not know. We had no infantry or other defences besides our one gun. The effect of this gun upon the troops about the gate of the city was so marked that General Worth saw it from his position. Mentioned in the reports of Major Lee, Colonel Garland, and General Worth.--Publishers. He was so pleased that he sent a staff officer, Lieutenant [John C.] Pemberton — later Lieutenant-General commanding the defences of Vicksburg — to bring me to him. He expressed his gratification at the services the howitzer in the church steeple was doing, saying that every shot was effective, and ordered a captain of voltigeurs to report to me with another howitzer to be placed along with the one already rendering so much service. I coul
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Return of the Army-marriage-ordered to the Pacific coast-crossing the Isthmus-arrival at San Francisco (search)
ed more than fifty officers who afterwards became generals on one side or the other in the rebellion, many of them holding high commands. All the older officers, who became conspicuous in the rebellion, I had also served with and known in Mexico: Lee, J. E. Johnston, A. S. Johnston, Holmes, [Paul] Herbert and a number of others on the Confederate side; McCall, Mansfield, Phil. Kearney and others on the National side. The acquaintance thus formed was of immense service to me in the war of the nowledge. The natural disposition of most people is to clothe a commander of a large army whom they do not know, with almost superhuman abilities. A large part of the National army, for instance, and most of the press of the country, clothed General Lee with just such qualities, but I had known him personally, and knew that he was mortal; and it was just as well that I felt this. The treaty of peace was at last ratified, and the evacuation of Mexico by United States troops was ordered. E
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Retrospect of the campaign-sherman's movements-proposed movement upon Mobile-a painful accident-ordered to report at Cairo (search)
l Bragg's army. This would necessarily have compelled Bragg to detach in order to meet this fire in his rear. If he had not done this the troops from Mobile could have inflicted inestimable damage upon much of the country from which his army and Lee's were yet receiving their supplies. I was so much impressed with this idea that I renewed my request later in July and again about the 1st of August, and proposed sending all the troops necessary, asking only the assistance of the navy to protecned to have a large number, about 5,000 head, of beef cattle there on the way from Texas to feed the Eastern armies, and also a large amount of munitions of war which had probably come through Texas from the Rio Grande and which were on the way to Lee's and other armies in the East. The troops that were left with me around Vicksburg were very busily and unpleasantly employed in making expeditions against guerilla bands and small detachments of cavalry which infested the interior, and in des
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
of having troops in positions from which they could move to advantage, and in collecting all necessary supplies so as to be ready to claim a due share of the enemy's attention upon the appearance of the first good weather in the spring. I expected to retain the command I then had, and prepared myself for the campaign against Atlanta. I also had great hopes of having a campaign made against Mobile from the Gulf. I expected after Atlanta fell to occupy that place permanently, and to cut off Lee's army from the West by way of the road running through Augusta to Atlanta and thence south-west. I was preparing to hold Atlanta with a small garrison, and it was my expectation to push through to Mobile if that city was in our possession: if not, to Savannah; and in this manner to get possession of the only east and west railroad that would then be left to the enemy. But the spring campaign against Mobile was not made. The Army of the Ohio had been getting supplies over Cumberland Gap
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first interview with President Lincoln (search)
have said that in our interview the President told me he did not want to know what I proposed to do. But he submitted a plan of campaign of his own which he wanted me to hear and then do as I pleased about. He brought out a map of Virginia on which he had evidently marked every position occupied by the Federal and Confederate armies up to that time. He pointed out on the map two streams which empty into the Potomac, and suggested that the army might be moved on boats and landed between the mouths of these streams. We would then have the Potomac to bring our supplies, and the tributaries would protect our flanks while we moved out. I listened respectfully, but did not suggest that the same streams would protect Lee's flanks while he was shutting us up. I did not communicate my plans to the President, nor did I to the Secretary of War or to General Halleck. March the 26th my headquarters were, as stated, at Culpeper, and the work of preparing for an early campaign commenced.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
north. The Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee commanding, was on the south bank of tction of Washington even while it was moving on Lee, so all the forces to the west, and the Army ofand effective men, and operate directly against Lee's army, wherever it may be found. Sigel colnced also gave us possession of stores on which Lee relied. Butler was to advance by the James Rivh corresponding objections. By crossing above, Lee is cut off from all chance of ignoring Richmondrts and ferries will be provided so that should Lee fall back into his intrenchments at Richmond, B wanted on the James River or elsewhere. If Lee's left is turned, large provision will have to ccupy from the Rapidan to the James River. But Lee could, if he chose, detach or move his whole ar besieging or assaulting. To get possession of Lee's army was the first great object. With the cad been moved bodily to the James River by water Lee could have moved a part of his forces back to R[3 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Commencement of the Grand campaign-general Butler's position-sheridan's first raid (search)
h a thing was possible over such a vast field. Lee, with the capital of the Confederacy, was the m rebellion as would the possession of Richmond, Lee and his army. All other troops were employed eay and York River as if threatening the rear of Lee's army. At midnight they turned back, and Butlen him to understand that I should aim to fight Lee between the Rapidan and Richmond if he would stand; but should Lee fall back into Richmond I would follow up and make a junction of the armies of will briefly mention Sheridan's first raid upon Lee's communications which, though an incident of the Army of the Potomac, pass around the left of Lee's army and attack his cavalry: to cut the two res. This move took him past the entire rear of Lee's army. These orders were also given in writinsylvania, but did not know where either this or Lee's army now was. Great caution therefore had to n in this memorable raid passed entirely around Lee's army: encountered his cavalry in four engagem
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt, commanding Artillery. Reserve, Col. H. S. Burton. First Brigade, Col. J. H. Kitching. Second Brigade, Maj. J. A. Tompkins. First Brig. Horse Art., Capt. J. M. Robertson. Second Brigade Horse Art., Capt. D. R. Ransom. Third Brigade, Maj. R. H. Fitzhugh. General Headquarters Provost Guard, Brig.-Gen. M. R. Patrick. Volunteer Engineers, Brig.-Gen. H. W. Benham. Confederate Army. organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, August 31st, 1864. First Army corps: Lieut.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, Commaanding. [Longstreet until wounded] Maj.-Gen. Geo. E. Pickett's division. Brig.-Gen. Seth M. Barton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. M. D. Corse's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Wm. R. Terry's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. W. Field's division. (b) Brig.-Gen. G. T. Anderson's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law's (c)) Brigade. Brig.-Gen. John Bratton's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. J. B. Kershaw's division. (d) Bri
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Cold Harbor-an anecdote of the war- battle of Cold Harbor-correspondence with Lee-Retrospective (search)
d not be cared for without a cessation of hostilities. So I wrote the following: Cold Harbor, Va. June 5, 1864 General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate Army. It is reported to me that there are wounded men, probably of both armies, now lyinr dead and wounded, a flag of truce be sent. I answered this immediately by saying: Cold Harbor, Va. June 6, 1864 General R. E. Lee, Commanding Army of N. Va. Your communication of yesterday's date is received. I will send immediately, as you ties I may have sent out, as mentioned in my letter, to be turned back. I answered: Cold Harbor, Va. June 6, 1864 General R. E. Lee, Commanding Army, N. Va. The knowledge that wounded men are now suffering from want of attention, between the tw the meantime all but two of the wounded had died. And I wrote to Lee: Cold Harbor, Va. June 7, 1864, 10.30 A. M. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Army of N. Va. I regret that your note of seven P. M. yesterday should have been received at the nea
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