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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 1: Introduction.—Dr. Wayland's arguments on the justifiableness of war briefly examined (search)
rn, with a purer and brighter flame. Our forefathers were not the less mindful of their duty to their God, because they also faithfully served their country. If we are called upon to excel them in works of charity, of benevolence, and of Christian virtue, let it not be said of us that we have forgotten the virtue of patriotism. For further discussion of this subject the reader is referred to Lieber's Political Ethics, Part II., book VII. chap. 3; Paley's Moral and Political Philosophy; Legare's Report of June 13, 1838, in the House of Representatives; Mackintosh's History of the Revolution of 1688, chap. x.; Bynkershock; Vatel; Puffendorf; Clausewitz; and most other writers on international law and the laws of war. Dr. Wayland's view of the question is advocated with much zeal by Dymond in his Inquiry into the Accordancy of War with the Principles of Christianity; Jay's Peace and War; Judd's Sermon on Peace and War; Peabody's Address, &c.; Coue's Tract on What is the Use of t
he approach of a gunboat up the Stono. Enemy saw them and landed. Legare's, on James Island, shelled this day by a gunboat slowly going up tnemy and a small party of our men lay near each other all night, at Legare's. Capt. Chichester's guns, in being withdrawn from Legare's Point nd to ascertain enemy's position. Sharp skirmish with the enemy at Legare's, in which Lieut.-Col. Capers drove back, for a half-mile and more troops. Enemy ascertained from prisoners to be in strong force at Legare's, under command of Brig.-Gen. Stevens. Heavy bombardment all day ts, of our troops in line of battle, to resist enemy's advance from Legare's; our troops necessarily much exposed. A section of Capt. Williamnd under a direct fire from a piece of the enemy's, at the woods on Legare's, in front. The fire from these guns, and from the stationary andand the Stono. Party probably from gunboats. Enemy withdrawn from Legare's. July 8.--Enemy known to have altogether abandoned James Islan
Charleston, S. C. July 15.--On Wednesday last the pickets of the Eutaw Battalion entered Legare's, the enemy having — to use their own expressive term--skedaddled the day previous. The first feature meeting the eyes of the advancing confederates was a number of mock sentinels stationed at intervals along the road. The dummies were neatly manufactured out of old clothes, and, with the addition of damaged gun-stocks, looked quite the martial Yankee. They were doubtless posted on the road wihousands of empty bottles, boxes, tin cans, etc. The rogues had undoubtedly been living luxuriously. What was more interesting, however, our men captured a large quantity of Yankee letters, documents and newspapers. The walls of the houses at Legare's were variously inscribed, most of the language being too indecent for repetition here. Appeals were frequently made to the victorious con federates thus, Now, boys, don't give up the old flag, or Boys, we are not fighting about the nigger, but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations before Charleston in May and July, 1862. (search)
ch of a gunboat up the Stono. Enemy saw them and landed. Legare's, on James's Island, shelled this day by a gunboat slowlya small party of our men lay near each other all night, at Legare's. Captain Chichester's guns, in being withdrawn from LegaLegare's point during the night, stuck in the mud. Men engaged in endeavoring to extricate them driven off by the enemy near morertain enemy's position. Sharp skirmish with the enemy at Legare's, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Capers drove back for a hal Enemy ascertained from prisoners to be in strong force at Legare's, under command of Brigadier-General Stevens. Heavy bombur troops in line of battle to resist enemy's advance from Legare's — our troops necessarily much exposed. A section of Cap a direct fire from a piece of the enemy's at the woods on Legare's, in front. The fire from these guns, and from the statiStono; party probably from gunboats. Enemy withdrawn from Legare's. July 8. Enemy known to have altogether abandoned
passage up the river of monitors by day, and of gunboats and even transports by night. 2d. It would not prevent the landing of troops at Battery Island and at Legare's, via Folly River Creek, which could then take in rear the isolated battery at Grimball's. 3d. It could then be silenced in a few hours by batteries on the opposite shore of the Stono, assisted by monitors and gunboats in the river. I have had for some time in contemplation a dispersive line from Legare's to Grimball's, with a strong work at the latter, a battery at the former, and a system of lines in rear of Battery Island. I would have, also, at the latter point an outwork for strengthened, and its armament increased in quantity and quality; obstructions should also have been put in the river under the guns of the work, and a battery at Legare's should have been located to guard the approach via Folly River Creek. This short line of works would have dispensed entirely with the long, weak, and expensive
landing on Battery Island; their advance pickets and ours arc firing. Pickets from Grimball's (on the Stono) report the enemy landing at that place. Three gunboats and a monitor proceeded up the Stono as far as the obstructions. On the morning of the 10th of July, while the attack was progressing on Morris Island, Colonel Simonton telegraphed that the main body of the enemy were moving in force from Battery Island to Legare's house, having a line of pickets extending from a point at Legare's in an oblique line up the Stono, cutting the Grimball causeway about midway. Later in the day, however, the same officer telegraphed that the reported advance of the enemy was premature: They are in force on Battery Island. Though the demonstration of the enemy in the Stono and on James Island was instituted to distract our attention from Morris Island, yet it was made in such strength that at any moment it could have been converted into a real attack of the most disastrous kind to us,
ing about the Marsh Battery, as we may still complete it, after having finished the Shell Point Battery. Instead of constructing those two field batteries near Legare's, for two pieces each, make them large enough for four pieces, to be supported by rifle-pits and four companies of infantry to each battery. Afterwards we wilhf.-Engr., Dept. S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C.: Colonel,—The Commanding General directs me to say that he wishes the batteries on James Island (about Legare's), bearing on Black Island, to be increased by at least twenty (20) guns, on siege-carriages. This work should be pushed forward night and day, as indeed at Sheer, etc., etc.: Colonel,—It is the wish of the Commanding General that the work on the Sullivan's Island Batteries, Simkins (Shell Point), Cheves, and Haskell (Legare's), shall be pushed forward, night and day. To do the work on hand the negroes must be divided in two parties, and these again subdivided into reliefs, as also
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
in January and March of the following year. But with the exception of that venerable Sage and apostle of Liberty, John Quincy Adams, scarcely a voice was heard in either House in advocacy of the measure. Mr. Hamilton, of South Carolina, declared that Haytien independence could not be tolerated in any form; and his colleague, Mr. Hayne, not only deprecated any such recognition, but demanded that our ministers in South America and Mexico, should protest against the independence of Hayti. Mr. Legare, also of the same State, opposed it violently. He was an accomplished scholar; but even the amenities of literary culture had not gained any covert in his breast, where sympathy with black men struggling for elevation could find shelter He said that the memorial originated in a design to revolutionize the South, and convulse the Union. As sure as you live, sir, was his prophecy, if this course is permitted to go on, the sun of this Union will go down in blood, and go down to rise no more
in January and March of the following year. But with the exception of that venerable Sage and apostle of Liberty, John Quincy Adams, scarcely a voice was heard in either House in advocacy of the measure. Mr. Hamilton, of South Carolina, declared that Haytien independence could not be tolerated in any form; and his colleague, Mr. Hayne, not only deprecated any such recognition, but demanded that our ministers in South America and Mexico, should protest against the independence of Hayti. Mr. Legare, also of the same State, opposed it violently. He was an accomplished scholar; but even the amenities of literary culture had not gained any covert in his breast, where sympathy with black men struggling for elevation could find shelter He said that the memorial originated in a design to revolutionize the South, and convulse the Union. As sure as you live, sir, was his prophecy, if this course is permitted to go on, the sun of this Union will go down in blood, and go down to rise no more
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
d Staub received his death wound. For once, since leaving Dalton, we find ourselves across the Chattahoochie. For Johnston waits to strike his crawling foe. But Peach-Tree Creek soon called us to our work, and in defending its passage we lose Legare and Percy and Ricketts. Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad and badly shod. Columbia is taken, and Franklin's ditches are made level with Confederate dead. Bates's division is thrown toward Murfreesboro. At Overall creek it is Leverich's canister saving us from destruction, and rid
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