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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Jacob Leisler or search for Jacob Leisler in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 (search)
Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 Colonial governor; was a member of Leisler's council in 1688 and was condemned with Leisler, but subsequently pardoned. In 1700 he became lieutenant-colonel of a militia regiment under Governor Bellomont. After the removal of Governor Ingoldsby. Beekman was president of the council and acting governor of New York until the arrival of Governor Hunter, in whose council he also served. He died in New York City about 1728. Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 Colonial governor; was a member of Leisler's council in 1688 and was condemned with Leisler, but subsequently pardoned. In 1700 he became lieutenant-colonel of a militia regiment under Governor Bellomont. After the removal of Governor Ingoldsby. Beekman was president of the council and acting governor of New York until the arrival of Governor Hunter, in whose council he also served. He died in New York City about 1728.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bellomont, Richard Coote, Earl of, (search)
, in 1699, he was well received, and his administration was popular. Bellomont had been one of the parliamentary committee appointed to investigate the affair of Leisler's trial and execution, and had taken a warm interest in the reversal of the attainder of that unfortunate leader. On his arrival in New York, he naturally connecinquire into the conduct of Governor Fletcher, and he was so well satisfied of his malfeasance in office that he sent him to England under arrest. The remains of Leisler and Milborne were taken up, and after lying in state several days were reburied in the Dutch Church. Bellomont chose for his council a majority of Leislerians ; and that party soon obtained a majority in the Assembly also. One of their first acts was to vote an indemnity to the heirs of Leisler. Bellomont used every means to gain the good — will of the people in both provinces, and succeeded. The earl was a shareholder in the privateer ship commanded by Captain Kidd; and when that seama
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
Rights, it sprang up into a vigorous fruit-bearing plant. Its power was manifested in the choice and administration of Leisler as ruler until a royal governor was appointed, and his death caused the line of separation between democracy and aristoccy—republicanism and monarchy — Leislerians and Anti-Leislerians —to be distinctly drawn. During the exciting period of Leisler's rule, the aristocratic or royalist party were led by Nicholas Bayard (q. v.), a wealthy and influential citizen, who was warmly seconded by Robert Livingston (q. v.). These two men were chiefly instrumental in bringing Leisler to the scaffold and treating his family and friends in a shameful manner. This conduct was continued until the Earl of Bellomont succeeded he verge of a pit which he had digged himself, and he pushed him into it. Bayard had procured an act, in 1691, aimed at Leisler and his supporters, providing that any person who should in any manner endeavor to disturb the government of the colony <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dongan, Thomas, 1634-1715 (search)
he enlightened governor resisted the measure as dangerous to English power on the continent. His firmness in defence of the rights of the people and the safety of the English colonies in America against what he could not but regard as the treachery of the King finally offended his sovereign, and he was dismissed from office in the spring of 1688, when Andros took his place, bearing a vice-regal commission to rule all New England besides. Dongan remained in the province until persecuted by Leisler in 1690, when he withdrew to Boston. He died in London, England, Dec. 14, 1715. On May 24, 1901, eight loose sheets of parchment, containing the engrossed acts passed during 1687-88, and bearing the signature of Thomas Dongan as governor of the province of New York, were restored to the State of New York by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This interesting historical find was accounted for on the presumption that the documents had formed a part of the archives of Massachusetts since
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fletcher, Benjamin (search)
from William and Mary in 1692, and arrived at New York City on Aug. 29 of that year; later in the year was also commissioned to assume the government of Pennsylvania and the annexed territories; and made his first visit to Philadelphia in April, 1693. Fletcher was a colonel in the British army. Possessed of violent passions, he was weak in judgment, greedy, dishonest, and cowardly. He fell naturally into the hands of the aristocratic party, and his council was composed of the enemies of Leisler. The recklessness of his administration, his avarice, his evident prostitution of his office to personal gain, disgusted all parties. He continually quarrelled with the popular Assembly, and his whole administration was unsatisfactory. The Quaker-governed Assembly of Pennsylvania thwarted his schemes for obtaining money for making war on the French; and he was fortunately led by Col. Peter Schuyler in all his military undertakings. The Assembly of Connecticut denied his right to contr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Leisler, Jacob 1660- (search)
ve militia companies, surrounded the house of Leisler and induced him to lead a movement for the sengston, and others, and the democrats, led by Leisler. The fort was seized, with the public money he people of New York and New England gave to Leisler, departed for England; and the members of hise true governors of the colony, and denounced Leisler as an arch-rebel. Leisler's son-in-law, Jacor Nicholson. As the latter was on the ocean, Leisler assumed the title of lieutenant-governor, cons for carrying on war with Canada. Leaving Leisler's letter unanswered, King William commissione, by virtue of his commission from the King. Leisler refused compliance with the demand, but proclnd others of the old council were in prison. Leisler was, for a time, besieged in the fort, and to await the King's decision in the matter. Leisler's enemies burned with a desire for revenge. ong them were Robert Livingston and others of Leisler's bitter enemies. The prisoners protested th[8 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montreal, massacre at (search)
he conquest of Canada was speedily arranged. A fleet under Phipps proceeded against Quebec, and colonial land forces were placed under the supreme command of Fitz-John Winthrop, son of Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut. Milborne, son-in-law of Leisler, undertook, as commissary, to provide and forward subsistence for the march. Colonel Schuyler with a party of Mohawks, the van of the expedition, pushed forward towards the St. Lawrence, but was repulsed by Frontenac (August). The remainder of the troops did not proceed farther than Lake George, where they were stopped by a deficiency of provisions and the prevalence of the smallpox. Mutual recriminations followed, and Leisler actually caused Winthrop's arrest. The latter charged the failure to Milborne, who, it was alleged, had failed to furnish needed provisions and transportation. In 1711, within a fortnight after Colonel Nicholson had given notice of an intended expedition against Canada, New York and the New England colonie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
New York; but the privileges promised were denied. When James was driven from the throne, and Nicholson, the lieutenant-governor, afraid of the people, fled, Jacob Leisler, a merchant of republican tendencies, administered the government for some time in the name of the new sovereigns, William and Mary. When Sloughter, the royal governor, came, the enemies of Leisler procured his execution by hanging (see Leisler, Jacob). During these political troubles, western New York, then inhabited by the Seneca Indians, was invaded by the French, under De Nonville, governor of Canada. Two years later (1689) the Five Nations retaliated by invading Canada. The retriart (see French and Indian War). Meanwhile the colony had been the theatre of warm political strife between the adherents of royalty and democracy. The death of Leisler had created intense popular feeling against royal rule by deputies, and there was continual contention between the popular Assembly and the royal governor. There
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
nder the Dutch. Name.Term. Cornelius Jacobsen May 1624 William Verhulst1625 Peter MinuitMay 4, 1626 to 1633 Wouter Van Twiller April, 1633 to 1638 William KieftMarch 28, 1638 to 1647 Peter Stuyvesant May 11, 1647 to 1664 Under the English. Richard NicollsSept. 8, 1664 to 1668 Francis LovelaceAug. 17, 1668to 1673 Dutch resumed. Anthony Colve1673 to 1674 English resumed. Edmund AndrosNov. 10, 1674 to 1683 Thomas DonganAug. 27, 1683 1688 Francis Nicholson.1688 to 1689 Jacob LeislerJune 3, 1689to 1691 Henry SloughterMarch 19, 1691 Richard IngoldsbyJuly 26, 1691 1692 Benjamin FletcherAug. 30, 1692 1698 Richard, Earl Bellomont1698 1701 John Nanfan 1701 to 1702 Lord CornburyMay 3, 1702 to 1708 John, Lord Lovelace Dec. 18, 1708 to 1709 Richard IngoldsbyMay 9, 1709to 1710 Gerardus BeekmanApril 10, 1710 Robert HunterJune 14, 1710 1719 Peter SchuylerJuly 21, 1719 to 1720 William Burnet Sept. 17, 1720to 1728 John MontgomeryApril 15, 1728 to 1731 Rip Van Dam 17
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
Trials. The following is a list of the most notable trials in the United States: Anne Hutchinson; sedition and heresy (the Antinomian controversy); imprisoned and banished......1637 Trials of Quakers in Massachusetts......1656-61 Jacob Leisler, New York, convicted and executed for treason......May 16, 1691 Trials for witchcraft, Massachusetts......1692 Thomas Maule, for slanderous publications and blasphemy, Massachusetts......1696 Nicholas Bayard, treason......1702 John Peter Zenger, for printing and publishing libels on the colonial government, November, 1734, acquitted......1735 William Wemms, James Hartegan, William McCauley, and other British soldiers, in Boston, Mass., for the murder of Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray, Samuel Maverick, James Caldwell, and Patrick Carr.......March 5, 1770 Maj.-Gen. Charles Lee, court-martial after the battle of Monmouth; found guilty of, first, disobedience of orders in not attacking the enemy; second, unnecessary an
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