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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
ght thousand of all arms, held in readiness to discharge such duties as the waning fortunes of the cause and the honor of its arms might demand. Intelligence of Lee's surrender reached us. Staff officers from Johnston and Sherman came across the country to inform Canby and myself of their convention. Whereupon an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel William M. Levy (now a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby with a large escort, and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby himself and Admiral James Palmer. All extended cordial greetings. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be gi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
ms, held in readiness to discharge such duties as the waning fortunes of the cause and the honor of its arms might demand. Soldierly courtesy. Intelligence of Lee's surrender reached us. Staff officers from Johnston and Sherman came across the country to inform Canby and myself of their convention. Whereupon, an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel William M. Levy (now a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby with a large escort, and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby himself and Admiral James Palmer. All extended cordial greetings. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be gi
my attacked the redoubts, his attempt to flank by crossing the Warwick river was foiled in part by the unerring volleys of the First Louisiana battalion. On the 16th a determined attack was made on the Confederate line at Dam No. 1, where Col. William M. Levy, of the Second Louisiana, was in command. A Vermont regiment threw itself into the rifle-pits of a North Carolina regiment, and in the brilliant charge which dislodged the Green Mountain boys, the companies of Capts. A. H. Martin and R. Ehe intrusive Federals. In the same fight, the Fifth, Col. T. G. Hunt, and the Tenth, Col. Mandeville de Marigny, were commended by their superior officers. The success of the Confederates was largely attributed to the coolness and courage of Colonel Levy. The Donaldsonville battery, Captain Maurin, and Rosser's battery, Washington artillery, did effective service on the lines, as well as other commands not mentioned in the reports. One day during these clamorous reports of war Magruder fav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
s, was held in readiness to discharge such duties as the waning fortunes of the cause and the honor of its arms might demand. Soldierly courtesy. Intelligence of Lee's surrender reached us. Staff officers from Johnston and Sherman came across the country to inform Canby and myself of their Convention. Whereupon an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel Wm. M. Levy (afterwards a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand-car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby, with a large escort and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby, himself, and General James Palmer. All extended cordial greeting. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, General J. L, wounded, 234. Kenesaw, Assault of, 159. Kenna, Hon. J. E., 86. Kennon, Lieut, Beverley, 360. Lafayette, Visit of in 1825, 2. Lane, General J. H., 352. Lee, General E. J.. 267; General Fitzhugh, 191; Captain Francis D., 330; General G. W. C., 129; General R. E., his statue in Statuary Hall, 81; prescience and self-sacrifice and magnanimity of, 52, 234; on battle of Gettysburg, 358, the sword of, 208. Lee, Captain R E. 40. Letcher, Governor, John, 267. Levy, Colonel W. M., 50. Logan's Cross Roads, or Mill Creek, Battle of, and forces engaged at, 166; monument and cemetery at, 170. Longstreet, General, James, 231, 352. Lookout Mountain, Battle of 129. Louisiana in 1861, 13th Infantry and officers of, 118. Lownes, Wm., 2. Lowrance, Colonel, 356. Lowry, General, Robert, 156. Lucal, Major J. J., 75. Mabie, Hamilton W., 97. McCabe, W. Gordon 372. McClanahan, Captain John H., 12. McCausland, General, John, 266. McClellan General G. B.,