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l William Waltermire. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Jacob Sharpe. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred Neafie. Thirty-eighth Massachusetts, Major Charles F. Allen. One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, Captain Charles R. Anderson. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred Neafie. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (2), Captain James J. Hoyt. One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York (three companies), Captain Charles McCarthey. One Hundred and Seventy-sixth New York, Major Charles Lewis. Fourth brigade: Colonel David Shunk. Eighth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander J. Kenny. Eighteenth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel William S. Charles. Twenty-fourth Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel John Q. Wilds. Twenty-eighth Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel Bartholomew W. Wilson. artillery: Maine Light Artillery, First Battery (A), Captain Albert W. Bradbury. reserve artillery: Captain Elijah D. Taft. Indiana Light Artillery, Seventeenth Battery, Captain Milton L. Miner. First Rhode Island Lig
el William Waltermire. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Daniel Macauley. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred Neafie. Thirty-eighth Massachusetts, Major Charles F. Allen. One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, Captain Charles R. Anderson. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred Neafie. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (2), Captain Alfred Cooley. One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York (battalion), Captain Charles McCarthey. One Hundred and Seventy-sixth New York, Major Charles Lewis. Fourth brigade: Colonel David Shunk. Eighth Indiana (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander J. Kenny. Eighth Indiana (2), Major John R. Polk. Eighteenth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel William S. Charles. Twenty-fourth Iowa (1), Lieutenant-Colonel John Q. Wilds. Twenty-fourth Iowa (2), Captain Leander Clark. Twenty-fourth Iowa (3), Major Edward Wright. Twenty-eighth Iowa (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bartholomew W. Wilson. Twenty-eighth Iowa (2), Major John Meyer. artillery: Maine Light Ar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
William W. Darnall; 22d Iowa, Col. Harvey Graham; 3d Mass. Cavalry (dismounted), Col. Lorenzo D. Sargent; 131st N. Y., Col. Nicholas W. Day; 159th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Waltermire. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 171; m, 97 = 287. Third Brigade, Col. Daniel Macauley, Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie: 38th Mass., Maj. Charles F. Allen; 128th N. Y., Capt. Charles R. Anderson; 156th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie, Captain Alfred Cooley; 175th N. Y. (batt'n), Capt. Charles McCarthey; 176th N. Y., Maj. Charles Lewis. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 87; m, 191 = 298. Fourth Brigade, Co]. David Shunk: 8th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Alexander J. Kenny, Maj. John R. Polk; 18th Ind., Lieut.-Col. William S. Charles; 24th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Q. Wilds, Capt. Leander Clark, Maj. Edward Wright; 28th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Bartholomew W. Wilson, Maj. John Meyer. Brigade loss: k, 26; w, 200; m, 103 = 329. Artillery: 1st Me., Lieut. Eben D. Haley, Lieut. John S. Snow. Artillery loss: k, 3; w, 17; m, 8 = 28. Reserve arti
e minutes after, Robertson and Sevier of Shelby's company came in and confirmed the account. Colonel Andrew Lewis, who had the command, instantly ordered out two divisions, each of one hundred and fifty men; the Augusta troops, under his brother Charles Lewis, the Botetourt troops under Fleming. Just as the sun was rising, the Indians opened a heavy fire on both Chap. XV.} 1774. Oct. parties; wounding Charles Lewis mortally. Fleming was wounded thrice; and the Virginians must have given waCharles Lewis mortally. Fleming was wounded thrice; and the Virginians must have given way, but for successive reinforcements from the camp. Be strong, cried Cornstalk, the chief of the Red Men; and he animated them by his example. Till the hour of noon, the combatants fought from behind trees, never above twenty yards apart, often within six, and sometimes near enough to strike with the tomahawk. At length the Indians, under the protection of the close underwood and fallen trees, retreated, till they gained an advantageous line extending from the Ohio to the Kanawha. A desulto
arroll550Dinwiddie172 Culpeper22Doddridge301 Cumberland45Elizabeth City30 Franklin216Fauquier42 Floyd200Fairfax38 Gloucester184Harrison52 Goochland155Henrico350 Fluvanna120James City8 Grayson174Jefferson541 Greene189Loudoun177 Halifax366Lewis90 Hancock49Norfolk City239 Isle of Wight225Montgomery31 King and Queen97Nottoway40 Louisa349Petersburg439 Lunenburg21Pittsylvania300 Madison246page109 Marshall115Powhatan96 Marion129Preston55 Mecklenburg249Pulaski28 Nansemond133RappahanLincoln 55; Douglas 17. Clarke --Official.--Breckinridge 335; Douglas 49; Bell 288. King George --Gives 40 majority for Breckinridge. Madison --Gives Breckinridge 700 majority. Taylor --Gives Bell 50 majority. Lewis --Gives Breckinridge 300 majority. Fauquier --Gives Breckinridge 1,035; Bell 988; Douglas 39. Caroline --Gives Breckinridge 213 maj. Marion, Monongalia, Taylor and Preston --Give 1,000 majority for Breckinridge. Ap
e by 2,700.--this will throw Bell's vote behind, as only two or three of the counties alluded to in the dispatch are given in the following table: Breckinridge Major's Accomac150 Allegheny301 Amherst175 Appomattox341 Barbour587 Brooke250 Caroline211 Charlotte47 Clarke47 Cumberland3 Doddridge204 Fauquier47 Frederick352 Floyd35 Gloucester157 Goochland189 Greene457 Halifax766 Hancock200 Harrison260 Isle of Wight609 King George42 King and Queen255 King William173 Lewis.300 Lunenburg275 Madison750 Mecklenburg471 Northumberland126 Orange48 page796 Prince Edward47 Prince William479 Roanoke80 Shenandoah1440 Tyler100 Warren186 Washington280 Wetzel549 Wythe177 11,943 Bell's majorities Albemarle201 Alexandria446 Amelia24 Augusta2330 Bath40 Berkeley83 Botetourt1 Bedford429 Buckingham22 Campbell317 Chesterfield456 Culpeper1 Dinwiddie135 Elizabeth City83 Fairfax7 Fluvanna32 Henrico700 James City88 Jefferson801 Loudoun1253
Swallowing a pin. --Dr. Lewis was called on yesterday morning to remove from the throat of a negro child a large brass pin, which had become completely embedded in the flesh. He performed the operation with great case, and relieved the little creature of pain.
city. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, nominated Samuel H. Jeter, of that city. Mr. Carlile, of Harrison, nominated Chas. Lewis, of that county. Mr. Flournoy, of Halifax, nominated Chas. Kent, of Pittsylvania. Mr. Morton nominated Mr. Rs P. Sutton, of Henrico. No other nominations being made, the vote was taken with the following result: Linkous, 45; Lewis, 29; Jeter, 26. All others 35. There being no election, the rules were suspended, on motion, and a resolution was ao drop all but the three highest candidates. The names of the three highest were then announced: Samuel H. Jeter, Chas. Lewis and Benj. R. Linkous — and the second ballot resulted: Linkous, 60; Jeter, 39; Lewis, 26.--No election. Mr. MontaLewis, 26.--No election. Mr. Montague moved that the Convention adjourn, but withdrew the motion. Mr. Jackson, of Wood, moved that the rules be suspended, in order to allow gentlemen to change their votes on the last ballot for Doorkeeper. The motion was carried, and seven
rfield456 Cumberland3Culpeper1 Doddridge204Charles City814 Essex29Dinwiddie135 Fauquier47Elizabeth City83 Franklin213Fairfax7 Frederick352Fluvanna32 Floyd35Greenbrier490 Gloucester164Hardy510 Goochland189Henry99 Greene457Highland47 Gilmer160Henrico700 Greensville13James City88 Hampshire184Jefferson501 Halitax766Londoun1253 Hancock200Marshall117 Harrison260Monroe175 Isle of Wight609Montgomery287 King George42Nansemond58 King and Queen256Nelson336 King William173New Kent94 Lewis355Norfolk City547 Lunenburg275Norfolk county255 Madison760Northampton20 Mecklenburg471Nottoway57 Marion768Ohio285 Matthews57Petersburg747 Northumberland74Portsmouth118 Orange48Powhatan98 page796Prince George52 Pleasants23Princess Anne72 Prince Edward47Pitisylvania645 Prince William479Pulaski82 Ritchie320Rappahannock80 Roanoke80Richmond City1234 Shenandoah1440Rockbridge892 Smyth50Rockingham206 Southampton23Spotsylvania187 Tyler100Stafford1 Upshur230Surry74 Warren186Taylor72
easant, in 1774, between the confederated tribes led on by their great chieftain Cornstalk, and the troops under the command of Gen. Andrew Lewis. This battle was one which had an important bearing on the revolution, soon to commence, insomuch as it put an end to those Indian hostilities which would otherwise have diverted the attention of Virginia from the encroachments of the English ministry, and left her free to inaugurate measures for resistance. No monument marks the spot where Colonel Chas. Lewis and Colonel Field fell covered with wounds, and where so many brave men lie on the field where they purchased victory with their blood. Plans have indeed been suggested at various times for suitably distinguishing the spot so memorable in our colonial history, but one by one they have been abandoned. Now the women of Point Pleasant have taken the enterprise under their control, and, of course, it must succeed. The Presbyterian says that a society has been organized, and was charter
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