hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 525 results in 55 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
erial, emblazoned with numerous heraldic escutcheons in gold. It is a room that you would love; and I now sit in a beautiful bow-window, which commands the fair lawn and terraces about the house, and the distant mountains which give a character to the scenery of this country, and in whose bosom lie the far-famed lakes of England. At breakfast the next morning I was gladdened by your letter of Aug. 10 and its enclosure, and Judge Story's generous double letter of Aug. 11; also Cushing's and Lieber's. Think of these meeting me at the breakfast-table of Lord Brougham! I took the liberty of reading to his Lordship what Judge S. said of his judicial opinions,—namely, that they were remarkable monuments of judicial reasoning, —and his Lordship seemed much gratified, and repeated the kind expressions which he had employed last evening about Judge S. He added, that his work on the Conflict of Laws enjoyed a reputation and authority here which caused it to be cited almost as a judgment of co
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
ing Menzel's History of German Literature. Longfellow published The Psalm of Life in Sept., 1838, and a few months later Hyperion and The Voices of the Night. Dr. Lieber visited Boston to superintend the publication of the Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was gathering the materials for a treatise leveland and Felton remembered him with many letters, full of affection, each detailing his studies, and the latter reporting also the incidents of college life. Lieber invoked his good offices with publishers and critics. Among correspondents who wrote with less frequency were Longfellow, Mr. Daveis, Luther S. Cushing (who wrot is tired of seeing and your ear of hearing, and then come back and give your country the benefit of your observation and rare opportunities of improvement. Dr. Lieber wrote, Oct. 9, 1838:— Greenleaf runs up and down the coast of the Atlantic like an anxious hen, while you, a young duck, swim lustily on the ocean. He is v
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
happy in renewing my acquaintance with the bench and bar after my absence in the country. Believe me, ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. London, Nov. 16, 1838. my dear Lieber,—. . . I arrived in London on Sunday. On Monday evening I submitted your book Political EthicLieber,—. . . I arrived in London on Sunday. On Monday evening I submitted your book Political Ethics. to Colburn, and he declined it. I had spoken to Clark in Edinburgh, who published Story's Conflict of Laws, but he also declined. From Colburn I went to Maxwell,—an intelligent and enterprising law-publisher, whom I knew very well, and who had just published Story's Equity Pleadings at my suggestion. He took your book, examin have met several times. I will dispose of several other copies in the same manner,—one to a leading writer in the London and Foreign Review. In a letter to Dr. Lieber, Dec. 13, Sumner, writing of reviews of the Political Ethics which he hoped to obtain, refers to John Stuart Mill as the most accomplished critic in that depar
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
e on my route, but am sated with society, and shall look at things. For the remainder of this letter, which was continued March 9, see post, p. 77. To Dr. Francis Lieber. travellers' Club, March 5, 1839. my dear Lieber,—Here goes a sheet after your own heart,—mammoth, and capable of holding an evening's chat. First, letLieber,—Here goes a sheet after your own heart,—mammoth, and capable of holding an evening's chat. First, let me acknowledge and answer your letters, which are now open before me. Under date of Dec. 23, 1838,—that good, teeming year, so brimful of happiness and instruction for me,—you ask for a Life of William of Orange. The day I received your letter, I asked Hallam, whom I often see, if he knew of any Life of this great man. He did ne stated, that eminent English lawyers do not write books. . . . The omitted parts of the letter relate chiefly to Sumner's efforts to promote the success of Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics. Ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth. George William Frederick, seventh Earl of Carlisle, and Viscount Morpeth, 1802-
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ess and fidelity to his convictions, and through life referred to him always in terms of filial respect. He had no undutiful conduct to recall. He had observed, in boyhood and in manhood, all the obligations of a son. You were a good son, wrote Lieber, in a letter of condolence. Cleveland, who knew all the circumstances of his life at home, wrote: That your duty to him was fully done, must now be a source of infinite satisfaction. But this narrative would be incomplete, if it said no more ofupon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one of the pall-bearers with George W. Greene, H. T. Tuckerman, and Dr. Lieber. of New York; he commenced life humbly, learned something of sculpture in the study of Frazee, where among other things he worked on the heads of Judge Prescott and Judge Story; here he saved a little money and gained a love for his art; and o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
h Emerson at Concord, on his way home. With Dr. Lieber, who made a visit to Boston, he had long talctionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber, New York. Dr. Lieber was then at theen shall we have the continuation? To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Boston, Dec. 10, 1840.olume of my Reports. . . . Behold me now, dear Lieber, in the tug and sweat of my profession, with rrson I have seen in New York, To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, Feb. 11, 1841. my dear Liebperhaps characteristic of the man. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, June 8, 1841. my dear Liebeby! Ever and ever yours, C. S. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, June 28, 1841. Anniversary nd faithfully yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Lieber, then at Washington, D. C., he wrote, July 5Bridgman, a girl deaf, dumb, and blind. To Lieber, then in New York, he wrote, Aug. 31, 1841:— ends. Ever and ever yours, C. S To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Hudson, on the North R[22 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
ia, S. C. Jan. 5, 1842. This morning, dear Lieber, comes to hand your note of Christmas. The beorner of a supper-room we talked of you and Mrs. Lieber. I reported to their glad souls the tidingr!) which they expect him to make? To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, Feb. 10, 1842. my dear LiebLieber,—. . . Longfellow's book contains some of the most beautiful gems of American poetry,—I would alm4, 1842. . . . Ever yours, C. S. To D1. Lieber he wrote, Feb. 21, 1842:— I shall not gou return to Oriental civilization. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, July 13, 1842. Your note, dear Lieber, came yesterday. . . . Do you abjure Boston, this summer? Bring Mrs. Lieber to the NorthMrs. Lieber to the North, and give Mary and myself the pleasure of making her personal friendship. Do not let it rest alwa There you sit, in what you call seclusion; Lieber had complained of his lot, which compelled him of the evening. Give us your seclusion. Ah! Lieber, be happy! I see you laugh at this overflow; [9 more...
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ancis Lieber. Epiphany, Jan. 6, 1848. dear Lieber,—I write you on my birthday; but I am of the asincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, July 11, 1843. dear Lieber,Lieber,—While waiting for my horse I begin a letter to you. I have often thought of you during my long sile, brown from the Atlantic sun. The presence of Lieber and Greene has made us very gay. To-night we sr and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber, New York. 4 Court Street, Saturday. r. The boy could not contain himself for joy. Lieber and I attended the monthly party of the blind , your wife, and the gentle A.! C. S. To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Sept. 12, 1843:— I have alres Lieber. Boston, Oct. 6, 1843. dear, dear Lieber,—My visit on the North River was full of deliglife, with very little sympathy. Ever, dear Lieber, thine, C. S. To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Oct.rancis Lieber. Boston, Oct. 14, 1843. dear Lieber,—You ask for my first sight of Orpheus. It ha[10 mor
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
the other. I long to know the result of those readings at Castle Howard, of which you wrote in your last letter. Ever and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Lieber, then in Boston and about embarking for Europe, he wrote, Jan. 29, 1844:— You have read Hillard's rich and beautiful article on Prescott in the North Americo see Allston's Belshazzar, which is a great though unfinished creation of genius. I walked with Fisher last evening. He is well; and every thing goes on well. Lieber, you know, is in Europe. My brother George is in Paris: he hopes to see you. You will find him sagacious, learned, humane, interested in all the institutions whi soul. He will be startled to find me ill, and clasping the pillows of a sick bed. Pardon me, if I allude to the Gallophobia, which you observed in our friend Lieber. Did you not see a reflection of your Anglophobia? I think both you and he proceed on a wrong principle. Man is properly formed to love his fellow-man, and not
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
glish and other foreign friends and to his brother George, he wrote to many American friends,--Dr. Lieber, Theodore Sedgwick, Benjamin D. Silliman, John Jay, Jacob Harvey, Samuel Ward, George Gibbs, Cut the two? What is the opinion in Europe? Write me every thing you know on the subject. Mrs. Lieber, with her three boys, has arrived from Hamburg; and all are nestled under Howe's roof. The Cl well but Hillard, whose exquisite soul frets its feeble body. Ever thine, Chas. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, June 3, 1845. dear Lieber,—We have your dear wife and the three boys among usLieber,—We have your dear wife and the three boys among us. I am glad to see them, and have already enjoyed two pleasant drives with her,—one in order to find a pleasant home for the summer. We looked through Brookline, but that is the retreat of fashion; a and how their future must fill your soul. They are continuations of yourself. Believe, my dear Lieber, that I take a true interest in their welfare, and long to be of service to them. But what can <
1 2 3 4 5 6