Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Thomas B. Lincoln or search for Thomas B. Lincoln in all documents.

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ld make that confession substantially every Sunday.--In the main, however, it has done well; as well, we think, as any other leader would have done under the same circumstances; better than there was any reason to expect; a good deal better than Lincoln, with all the money, means, and men of the North at his back. We feel confident therefore, that the Southern people in the late election for the Presidency and Vice Presidency have given, by a universal vote such a testimony of their approval o, at least for the present, lemere fault-finders forego their pet luxury Otherwise, the world will say of us that we are a peevish, fickle, discontented race, who will never be satisfied in any Government under Heaven; that we have just cast off Lincoln, and are now as anxious to be rid of Davis; that those who dissolved the old Union a year ago are getting ready to dissolve the now, and will are long be precipitated into remediless chaos and ruin. This has always been the prediction of open e
The Situation of affairs in Alexandria — deplorable condition of things — Federal Administration of justice, &c. The special correspondent of the New York Times, writing from Alexandria, Va., October 25th, sends to that paper the following description of the condition to which Lincoln's minions has reduced that city: Alexandria languishes, Most of her citizens who have not cast their fortunes with the rebel army are secretly wishing success to the rebel cause. Her railroads no more transport busy merchants to the North, or gladsome parties to the springs. Troops and Government stores are the only passengers or freight. Her hotels are empty, except the Marshall House, and that is occupied by Union troops. Her school-house — the property of a rebel, Maj. Kemper, does duty as a Union hospital. Her noble seminary on the heights, is likewise appropriated to the use of invalid soldiers of that army, which is viewed with so many lowering looks. Her wharves seem deserted, unl<
The blockade off Georgetown, S. C. --The Charleston, S. C., Courier, of the 2d instant has received a letter from a gentleman living near Georgetown, South Carolina, which says: "Our little harbor has been watched for some time by a large bark, doubtless one of Lincoln's apes. It has more the appearance of a full grown mastiff searching for mice than a man of war vessel. "The rice crop in this section is very good and the harvest nearly over. If abraham I. wishes to procure some for his subjects, he has only to send and we are prepared to give his ambassador a warm reception."
from Henderson, Ky., has turned out to be a Federal deception. A gentleman who arrived in Nashville on yesterday, and who left Louisville on Friday last, and passed through Henderson, reports that only a few Federal troops are at the latter place, and none between there and Hopkinsville. A dispatch in the New York Times, date at Washington, October 31, says there is again great slackness in the way of enlistments, especially in the larger States. Enlistments are so few that the War Department propose to again return to the system of accepting men directly, without the interposition of State authorities. The New York Harald's Washington dispatches of October 31st, state that President Lincoln informed certain United States Senators, who called upon him to know when a forward movement would take place that the responsibility of such a movement was left with Gen. McClellan, and that it was the purpose of the Executive to sustain him in undertaking whatever he advises.
Fremont's removal and his Successor. Norfolk, Nov. 6. --The New York Times, of Monday, has been received in this city, and contains the important announcement that President Lincoln has sent out an order to the Western Military Department transferring the command from General Fremont to General Hunter. The order is absolute and unconditional, and has reached Fremont before this time. It is based on Lincoln's thorough conviction of Fremont's incapacity as a General, and of gross profNew York Times, of Monday, has been received in this city, and contains the important announcement that President Lincoln has sent out an order to the Western Military Department transferring the command from General Fremont to General Hunter. The order is absolute and unconditional, and has reached Fremont before this time. It is based on Lincoln's thorough conviction of Fremont's incapacity as a General, and of gross profligacy of expenditures of the public money under his administration.
Indictments for treason in Cincinnati. Cincinnati, Oct. 31. --The Grand Jury in the United States Court, in this city, on yesterday, found true bills against James M. Menowith, James A. Skiff, and Thomas B. Lincoln, charged with treason.