Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Lincoln or search for Lincoln in all documents.

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ast: The people of Northwestern Virginia, heretofore firm, honest Union men, after the exposure of the treachery of Lincoln will indignantly repudiate Unionism. He and his supporters have villainously imposed upon the honesty of a large portiooks for encouragement and support in its crusade against the South, it will look in vain in Northwestern Virginia. When Lincoln assails the South, an almost unanimous cry will go up from our people of resistance to the death. We learn from theg Zouaves." The New York Journal of Commerce remarks as follows: In connection with George Law's letter to President Lincoln, advising the clearance of a path through Baltimore at all hazards, it is a significant fact that that gentleman prand abused that the arrival of a Southern army for its destruction will be scarcely necessary. It seems probable that Mr. Lincoln will have sufficiently done the work before he gets through. In the frescoed wall of the Capitol nails are driven for
noble old Commonwealth when she is pressed by her enemies. The following is from the Parkersburg Gazette, of Thursday last: The people of Northwestern Virginia, heretofore firm, honest Union men, after the exposure of the treachery of Lincoln will indignantly repudiate Unionism. He and his supporters have villainously imposed upon the honesty of a large portion of our people by professing to pursue a course of peace toward the South, while at the same time he was preparing the engin of destruction which were to devastate the country. No people are more patriotic than ours; but when Black Republicanism looks for encouragement and support in its crusade against the South, it will look in vain in Northwestern Virginia. When Lincoln assails the South, an almost unanimous cry will go up from our people of resistance to the death. We learn from the Lynchburg Republican that the Langhorne Foundry, in that city, owned by F. B. Deane, Jr., & Son, are daily turning out large
The "fighting Zouaves." The New York Journal of Commerce remarks as follows: In connection with George Law's letter to President Lincoln, advising the clearance of a path through Baltimore at all hazards, it is a significant fact that that gentleman presented Wilson's Fighting Zouaves with a pair of revolvers each. It is the unanimous wish of that regiment — expressed on repeated occasions — to force a passage through the Monumental city. The same desire is expressed by the Fire Department Zouaves, and, in fact, is universally cherished by the soldiers of New York. The petition to the President urging that the Baltimore route be held by the Government at any cost, is receiving numerous signatures of influential citizens throughout the city. Col. Learned is organizing a"Pathfinders' Association," the avowed object of which is to cleave a road to the capital through Baltimore. "Our route is through Baltimore," is printed in large letters at the foot of a poster, stuck ab
The Capitol Buildings, &c. Alluding to the present condition of the Federal Capitol, a writer says: Its costly and elaborately finished apartments were already so greatly defaced and abused that the arrival of a Southern army for its destruction will be scarcely necessary. It seems probable that Mr. Lincoln will have sufficiently done the work before he gets through. In the frescoed wall of the Capitol nails are driven for the hanging of accoutrements, sides of bacon, &c, and the places occupied by some of the troops are said to appear not only very dirty, but to smell so. The latest arrivals of recruits from Pennsylvania were from the vicinity of Pittsburgh, and it is stated they presented a most sorry appearance, many half shod, half dressed and decidedly unclean. All our Northern friends on the march through Maryland complain that they find the climate very hot.. If this be the case thus early in the season, what will be the effect in July?
Personnel of the Southern Army. We published yesterday, from the leading Black Republican papers of Philadelphia, a description of Lincoln's Ragged Regiments, and we now give the other side of the picture, as viewed by a correspondent of the Baltimore exchange on his route from Augusta, Georgia, last week: Before I left the far South, seven regiments of Georgia and Alabama troops had left for Virginia, and orders were issued on Wednesday last to the Atlanta (Georgia) regiment, and to the Second Alabama Regiment, at Montgomery, to march on Friday. Their headquarters will be Lynchburg, Virginia. Both of these regiments are composed of the most sterling men in the communities where they were raised, and have volunteered for the war, and not for any specified number of months, or under any shackling conditions as to where they will do service. The Second Alabama Regiment was raised three months since, and was the first regiment on duty at Pensacola. It was this corps of
Trouble in Abe's family. --A correspondent of the Baltimore Sun writes that there has been some intestine trouble at the White House. Mr. Lincoln desired Mrs. Lincoln to return to Springfield with the family at least for a short time, until the present difficulties that surround the Executive are dissipated.--Gen. Scott is saat the White House. Mr. Lincoln desired Mrs. Lincoln to return to Springfield with the family at least for a short time, until the present difficulties that surround the Executive are dissipated.--Gen. Scott is said to have joined in the recommendation, but Mrs. Lincoln positively refused to "secede," and there the matter rests. at the White House. Mr. Lincoln desired Mrs. Lincoln to return to Springfield with the family at least for a short time, until the present difficulties that surround the Executive are dissipated.--Gen. Scott is said to have joined in the recommendation, but Mrs. Lincoln positively refused to "secede," and there the matter rests.
General Houston is out for Texas and the South. He calls upon his fellow-citizens of Texas to respond to Lincoln's order "lay down their arms and disperse," just as they responded, at San Jacinto, to Santa Anna's order to surrender their arms and their lives into his hands.
Lincoln's idea of equal rights. --For the last few weeks Lincoln has been engaged in plotting his own downfall by gathering together hordes of Abolition scoundrels, with the avowed purpose of subjugating the South, because its citizens do not Lincoln has been engaged in plotting his own downfall by gathering together hordes of Abolition scoundrels, with the avowed purpose of subjugating the South, because its citizens do not fell inclined to submit to the ignoble vassalage implied in allowing him to rule over them. His purpose, as avowed by himself, as to compel respect to the laws of the United States, which he pretends to think have been violated by the secession of een once in Richmond with the German Yagers, of which he was the founder, and who, because his successor refused to take Lincoln's test oath, was refused his commission; in consequence of which the company has been ignored as part of the District soouse, and will stay here till the existing troubles are over, which he is ready to aid in the solution of by his sword. Lincoln cannot have a very extensive idea of morality and patriotism, if he indulges it to the extent of thinking that gentlemen
, in proportion? for three good reasons: First, granting that they could raise 350,000; instead of 261,100, and that all who were required to do so would willingly volunteer, the force kept at home, from motives of policy, custom and security, should not be less than 50,000, so that the available would be only 250,000. secondly: Neither North nor South, nor any nation other than France, Russia and Austria, could send on a long journey 261,000 men, and feed and supply it on the road; and Mr. Lincoln being pledged not to molest private property, or forcibly take provisions from the people in the invaded States, his Government could do it less than that of any other power.--Thirdly: the North can never raise 261,000 for outside fighting. Were she attacked at home, it is more likely, as all military men will see, that 3,000,000 could be brought into the field, than that 261,000 could be accumulated for a journey. "These who argued that we are raising volunteers, and not militia, gain
The blockade. --No mail from Baltimore was received in Portsmouth yesterday morning. Lincoln's blockade has become operative.
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