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minutes, captured the colors and stemmed the advance. Of the 262 officers and men who obeyed that order, half a hundred lay dead on the field and 174 others were wounded. The regiment's total mortality from that charge was 75, more than 28 per cent. of the number engaged — the highest known short of an Indian massacre. The Federals lost at Gettysburg 3,063 killed, 14,492 wounded, and 5,435 missing (Fox's figures). The Confederate loss was 3,903 killed, 18,735 wounded, and 5,435 missing (Livermore's figures). Total loss on both sides, 51,053. Gettysburg: near the spot where the First Minnesota was sacrificed to stem the advance of the Confederates after their victory at the Peach Orchard. The men who came to stay at Gettysburg: results of the first day's fighting at McPherson's Woods. Where a shell dropped Near the bloody angle of the battle was unceasing. About the middle of the afternoon a breeze lifted the smoke that had enveloped the whole battle-line in darkne
e Union army, after the fall of Petersburg, followed the streaming Confederates, retreating westward, and came upon a part of Gordon's troops near High Bridge over the Appomattox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river behind redoubts, but when Union troops appeared in force the Confederates again retreated westward along the river. High bridge over the Appomattox High bridge over the Appomattox letter of the 8th instant, they are accepted. I will p
e Union army, after the fall of Petersburg, followed the streaming Confederates, retreating westward, and came upon a part of Gordon's troops near High Bridge over the Appomattox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river behind redoubts, but when Union troops appeared in force the Confederates again retreated westward along the river. High bridge over the Appomattox High bridge over the Appomattox letter of the 8th instant, they are accepted. I will p
lt some of his former sweethearts and valued friends. Ruins of the Tredegar iron works in Richmond, April, 1865—the main factory for heavy cannon in the South After the great Richmond fire How could an army so poorly equipped, so imperfectly armed, so ill fed and ill clothed, win out in a contest with an army so vastly its superior in numbers and so superbly armed and equipped? I do not enter upon the contested question of the numbers serving in the respective armies. Colonel Livermore's Numbers and losses in the Civil War is the authority relied upon usually by writers on the Northern side; but his conclusions have been strongly, and as many of us think, successfully challenged by Cazenove G. Lee, in a pamphlet entitled Acts of the Republican Party as Seen by History, and published (in Winchester, 1906) under the pseudo C. Gardiner. How could an agricultural people, unskilled in the mechanical arts, therefore unable to supply properly its armies with munitions and c
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
n's Gap892127227 Sept. 14-15. A. P. Hill's Div., Bol. Hgts.36669 Sept. 14-15. Walker's Div., Loudon145 Aggregate1095486061,263 Total Fed., Crampton's Gap1154162533 Total Fed., Harper's Ferry4417312,52012,737 Aggregate15958912,52213,270 The casualties given in Mahone's brigade include those of the battle of Sharpsburg, which was not reported separately. No reports were made by the Confederate cavalry. The Confederate casualties at Boonsboro are not reported separately, except Rodes's brigade, which reports: killed 61, wounded 151, missing 204, total 522. It was most severely engaged of any, except, possibly, Garland's, which was routed when he was killed. Garland's losses for the whole campaign are given as: killed 86, wounded 440, total 526. Livermore's Numbers and losses in the civil War estimates the totals for the two armies at South Mountain, as follows:— force ENGAGEDKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Confederates17,85232515608002685 Federals28,480325140385183
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
h's division, six out of ten field-officers were killed or wounded. Our brigades rarely came to the field 2000 strong, and casualties of 600 to a brigade were rarely reached even in battles prolonged over a day. Here within six hours, five of the 15 brigades lost over 600 in killed and wounded each: Lane's N. C. brigade losing 786; Colston's N. C. and Va. losing 726; Pender's N. C., 693. The battle of Chickamauga is generally called the bloodiest of modern battles. The losses given by Livermore are 22 per cent in the Federal army and 25 per cent in the Confederate, in two days fighting. Jackson's three divisions had a paper strength of 26,661, and their losses were 7158, about 27 per cent. They were, doubtless, over 30 per cent of the force actually engaged. The losses in the 3d and 12th Federal corps, which composed the principal part of our opponents, were less, as they fought behind breastworks. Their strength on paper was 32,171. Their losses were 4703, being about 15 pe
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
ate76,22413 Corps, 10 Divisions, 44 Brigades, L6 Battns. Arty.68272 The figures given are the returns of the Officers and men present for duty on May 31. No later return was made before the battle. Similarly, for the Federal army, the table below gives the Officers and men present for duty on June 30, the last return before the battle. To arrive at the forces actually engaged, deductions must be made from these figures in both armies for sick, guards, and details. This deduction Livermore averages at seven per cent for Infantry and Artillery and 15 per cent for Cavalry. Army of the Potomac. Present for duty, June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brews
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
and the 6th Federal corps was scarcely engaged at all. The totals given are from the official returns of both armies, but the Confederate returns are known to be very incomplete. The best estimate of actual Confederate losses has been made by Livermore in Numbers and losses in the civil War. It is about 50 per cent greater for the killed and wounded, and is attached hereto. Confederate casualties. Gettysburg. Approximate by brigades COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Kershaw11548332630 Confederate casualties. Gettysburg. Approximate by brigades COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Hampton17581691 Lee, F.5162950 Lee, W. H. F.2261341 Jones1240658 Jenkins's Arty. Total Cavalry3614064240 Aggregate2,59212,7095,15020,451 Livermore's Estimate3,90318,7355,42528,063 Federal casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wadsworth2991,2296272,155 Robinson916169831,690 Rowley2651,2965412,103 Wainwright's Arty.98611106 1st Corps6663,1312,1626,0
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
eserve division, organized as shown below. No exact returns of the total present for duty exist, but instead are given Livermore's estimates of the Effective Strength. Livermore's Numbers and losses in civil War, p. 105. Army of Tenn., Gen. BLivermore's Numbers and losses in civil War, p. 105. Army of Tenn., Gen. Bragg, Sept. 19--20, 1863 corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTERIES PolkCheathamJackson, Smith, Maney, Wright, Strahl5 HindmanAnderson, Deas, Manigault3 Hill, D. H.CleburneWood, Polk, Deshler3 BreckenridgeHelm, Adams, Stovall4 WalkerGistColquitt, Ector, The organization of the Federal army, with its strength present for duty before the battle, is given below, and also Livermore's estimate of the Effective Strength. Army of the Cumberland, Gen. Rosecrans, Sept. 19--20, 1863 corpsDIVISIONSBRIGcasualties as there had been at Chickamauga. Grant's total was 753 killed, 4722 wounded, 349 missing. Total 5824. Livermore estimates the forces engaged on each side as follows: — Effective Federal infantry and artillery,56,359. Effective
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
erate returns for 112, out of 183, regiments. The Federal casualties for the two days were:— Killed, 2246; wounded, 12,037; missing, 3383; total, 18,366. Livermore estimates that in proportion to the numbers engaged, the Confederate losses could not have been any less than the Federal, which, estimating only the killed and wounded, were 14,283 or 127 per 1000 men engaged. The numbers engaged, Livermore estimates as: — Federals101,895 Confederate61,025 and the corresponding Confederate loss would be 7750. The Confederates had: killed, Gens. J. M. Jones and L. A. Stafford, and wounded, Longstreet, Pegram, Benning, and Perry. The Federals had, woederate losses can never be accurately known for any of the battles, from now until the close of the war, as few reports could be made in such active campaigns. Livermore's estimates give 17,250 for the same battles, the missing not included. The north Anna and Cold Harbor After the signal failure on the 18th of his second v
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