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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 100 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Robert R. Livingston or search for Robert R. Livingston in all documents.

Your search returned 50 results in 24 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-federal party. (search)
ral government; and all who were opposed to this new feature of American politics at once accepted the name of Anti-Federalists, and opposed the ratification of the Constitution, inside and outside of the conventions. In Rhode Island and North Carolina this opposition was for a time successful, but in all the other States it was overcome, though in Pennsylvania there were strong protests of unfair treatment on the part of the Federalists. Many prominent men, such as Edmund Randolph, Robert R. Livingston, Madison, and Jefferson, while opposed by nature to a strong federal government, saw in the adoption of the Constitution the only salvation for the young Republic, and voted with the Federalists in this contest; but, after the Constitution had been adopted, it was natural that these men should aim at a construction of its terms which should not give the new government extensive power. These temporary Federalists, in about 1791-93, united with the old Anti-Federalists, and the party t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence. (search)
Declaration of Independence. It was very important to have Lee's resolution for independence, offered June 7, 1776, prefaced by a preamble that should clearly declare the causes which impelled the representatives of the people to adopt it. To avoid loss of time, a committee was appointed (June 11) to prepare such declaration. The committee was composed of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston. Mr. Lee having been called home before the appointment of the committee, Mr. Jefferson was put in his place. He was requested by the committee, after discussing the topics, to make a draft of a declaration of independence. It was discussed in committee, amended very slightly, and finally reported. Debates upon it were long and animated. There was some opposition to voting for independence at all, and it was considerably amended. It was evident from the beginning that a majority of the colonies would vote for independence (the vote in Co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duponceau, Peter Stephen, 1760-1844 (search)
Duponceau, Peter Stephen, 1760-1844 Philologist; born in the Isle of Rhea;, France, June 3, 1760; went to Paris in 1775, where he became acquainted with Baron Steuben, and accompanied him to America as his secretary. He was brevetted a captain (February, 1778), and assisted Steuben in the preparation of his system of military tactics for the use of the United States troops. From 1781 to 1783 he was secretary to Robert R. Livingston, then at the The old magazine at Williamsburg. head of the foreign office of the government; and then studying law, was admitted to practice in 1785, becoming eminent in the profession on questions of civil American Indians. In 1819 he published and international law. He finally devoted himself to literature and science, and made many valuable researches into the language and literature of the North a Memoir on the structure of the Indian Languages. When seventy-eight years of age (1838) he published a Dissertation on the Chinese language; also a t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fine Arts, the. (search)
In 1791 Archibald Robertson, a Scotchman and a portrait-painter, established a seminary in the city of New York which he called the Columbian Academy of Painting. He succeeded well, and his pupils did honor to the institution. In 1801 Robert R. Livingston, then American minister in France, proposed the establishment of an academy of fine arts in New York. He wrote to friends, suggesting the raising of funds by subscription for the purpose of purchasing copies of antique statuary and paintings for the instruction of young artists. An association for the purpose was formed late in 1802, but it was not incorporated until 1808. Meanwhile Mr. Livingston had obtained fine plaster copies of ancient statues and sent them over. In the board of managers were distinguished citizens, but there was only one artist—Colonel Trumbull. It bore the corporate title of Academy of Fine Arts. It had a feeble existence, though it numbered among its honorary members King George IV. of England, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foreign affairs. (search)
Foreign affairs. On Sept. 18, 1775, the Continental Congress appointed Messrs. Welling, Franklin, Livingston, Alsop, Deane, Dickinson, Langdon, McKean, and Ward a secret committee to contract for the importation from Europe of ammunition, small-arms, and cannon, and for such a purpose Silas Deane was soon sent to France. By a resolution of the Congress, April 17, 1777, the name of this committee was changed to committee of foreign affairs, whose functions were like those of the present Secretary of State (see cabinet, President's). Foreign intercourse was first established by law in 1790. President Washington, in his message, Jan. 8, 1790, suggested to Congress the propriety of providing for the employment and compensation of persons for carrying on intercourse with foreign nations. The House appointed a committee, Jan. 15, to prepare a bill to that effect, which was presented on the 21st. It passed the House on March 30. The two Houses could not agree upon the provisions of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fulton, Robert 1765-1815 (search)
invention, and in December, 1806, he arrived in New York. He went to Washington, where the models and drawings of his torpedo made a favorable impression. In 1807 he perfected his steamboat for navigating the Hudson, having been aided by Robert R. Livingston, with whom he had been acquainted in Paris. Livingston had made experiments in steamboating as early as 1798, when he was granted the exclusive privilege of navigating the waters of the State by steam. Fulton was finally included in the Livingston had made experiments in steamboating as early as 1798, when he was granted the exclusive privilege of navigating the waters of the State by steam. Fulton was finally included in the provisions of the act, and in September, 1807, the Clermont, the first steamboat that navigated the Hudson, made a successful voyage from New York to Albany and back. She travelled at the rate of 5 miles an hour. See Livingston, R. R. At this time, Fulton regarded his torpedo as the greater and more beneficial invention, as he believed it would establish the liberty of the seas. The government, in 1810, appropriated $5,000 to enable him to try further experiments with his torpedo; but a c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Robert Green 1833- (search)
lenaghan, a Philadelphia merchant, explaining the urgency, and enclosing $500, the amount of salary due him as clerk, as his contribution towards a relief fund. The merchant called a meeting the next day, and read Paine's letter. A subscription list was immediately circulated, and in a short time about $1,500,000 was raised. With this capital the Pennsylvania Bank—afterwards the Bank of North America—was established for the relief of the army. In 1783 Paine wrote a memorial to Chancellor Livingston, secretary of foreign affairs; Robert Morris, minister of finance, and his assistant, urging the necessity of adding a continental legislature to Congress, to be elected by the several States. Robert Morris invited the chancellor and a number of eminent men to meet Paine at dinner, where his plea for a stronger Union was discussed and approved. This was probably the earliest of a series of consultations preliminary to the constitutional convention. On April 19, 1783, it being th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jay, John 1817-1894 (search)
of pamphlets, among them are The dignity of the abolition cause; The American Church and the American slave-trade; The Great conspiracy and England's neutrality; Caste and slavery in the American Church; America free, or America slave, etc. He died in New York City, May 5, 1894. Statesman; born in New York City, Dec. 12, 1745; was of Huguenot descent. Graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1764, he was admitted to the bar in 1768, and formed a partnership with Robert R. Livingston. In 1774 he was a delegate in the first Continental Congress, and the same year he married a daughter of William Livingston, of New Jersey. In that Congress, though the youngest member but one, he took a conspicuous part, being the author of the Address to the people of Great Britain. His facile pen was often employed in framing documents in the Congress of 1775. Early in 1776 he left Congress and engaged in the public affairs of his own State, being a leading member of the Provin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 (search)
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, hConstitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
. In less than a fortnight after the beginning of negotiations in France, a treaty was signed (April 30, 1803) by Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe on the part of the United States, and Barbs Marbois on the part of France, by which the United St domain, containing a mixed free population of 85,000 white people and 40,000 negro slaves, for the sum of $15,000,000. Livingston and Marbois had been personal acquaintances for about a quarter of a century. We have lived long, said Livingston to MLivingston to Marbois, as he arose after signing the treaty, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives. The treaty which we have just signed has not been obtained by art or force; equally advantageous to the two contracting parties, it will change vast sol repelling invasion. They appointed a committee of safety, composed of distinguished citizens of New Orleans, of which Livingston was chairman. Governor Claiborne, who also believed Lafitte's story, sent copies of the British papers to Jackson, the
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