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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
my conduct. As if in such a matter I could have hostility or spite to anybody. I am a public servant, and never was I moved by a purer sense of duty than in this bill, all of which will be seen at last. Meanwhile men will flounder in misconception and misrepresentation, to be regretted in the day of light. Sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. Xiv. We cannot, however, bring even this brief list of citations to a close without some tributes, which Mr. G. W. Smalley, the accomplished London correspondent of The New York Tribune, sent from the English journals, which during the Alabama discussions spoke of the leader of the American Senate with so much bitterness: It is an honor to The Times, however, Mr. Smalley remarks, that it lifts itself high enough to say: Yet when we look back upon the 30 years during which Mr. Charles Sumner was among the foremost in the United States, we must admit that his career was such as to deserve the highest admiration and gratitude of
Xiv. We cannot, however, bring even this brief list of citations to a close without some tributes, which Mr. G. W. Smalley, the accomplished London correspondent of The New York Tribune, sent from the English journals, which during the Alabama discussions spoke of the leader of the American Senate with so much bitterness: It is an honor to The Times, however, Mr. Smalley remarks, that it lifts itself high enough to say: Yet when we look back upon the 30 years during which Mr. Charles Sumner was among the foremost in the United States, we must admit that his career was such as to deserve the highest admiration and gratitude of his fellow-citizens; and those who are disposed to judge his faults with severity must remember how much there was to provoke to intemperance of judgment the man who was pursued with such animosity that he barely escaped with life from a cowardly assault in the Senate Chamber at Washington. The Daily News, which, during the arbitration, was one