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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
oals, 24-27; and Hurlbut, 29-33; at Brattleboroa, 37,38; lecturing, 38, 45, 47-50, 56-58, 66, 72, 92-102, 253; and temperance, 41, 42, 55, 56, 80; at Worcester, 44-182, 221-23; on Sir Charles Grandison, 44, 45; and H. W. Beecher, 45-48; and Samuel Longfellow, 47-49; exchanges pulpits, 51, 52, 59; and Theodore Parker, 53, 54; and Lucy Stone, 55, 59-63; and Mrs. Chapman, 68, 69; and Anthony Burns, 68, 81; and Stephen Foster, 69, 70; arrested, 70; and the Quakers, 73-77; and disunion, 77-79; and Becdote of, 202; death, 236. Lincoln, Mrs., Abraham, 165; described, 164; about the President's death, 236. Lind, Jenny, marriage of, 39, 40. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 8; accounts of, 11, 12, 321; portrait of children of, 107. Longfellow, Samuel, 47-49. Lowell, James Russell, 8, 94. 113; evening with, 11-13; at Atlantic dinners, 107-12; as editor, 111; anecdote of, 262, 263. Lowell, Maria, sketch of, 12,13, 111. M McClellan, Gen., 271. McDougall, Bishop, 292, 293. Maggi
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, V: the call to preach (search)
e right —glorious, but, Oh how hard! In these moments of doubt his ever solicitous mother exhorted him to fresh courage and perseverance. Through these years of study in Cambridge, Wentworth made frequent visits to Brattleboro, kept the family supplied with books, and suggested lists for the village book club. He was constantly adding to his own collections of books, and wrote, My library is now becoming rather imposing. His principal companion in the school seems to have been Mr. Samuel Longfellow, brother of the poet, who was one year in advance of Wentworth. About this friend he said, He is a beautiful soul, though there is a certain shadow of reserve about him. He spoke of his sister Mrs. Fanny [Mrs. H. W. Longfellow]. I got a charming idea of the household goddess. She was just Wordsworth's phantom of delight, he said. While living in Divinity Hall Higginson formed a romantic attachment for a brilliant youth named Hurlbut, who was also a theological student. This frie
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
his wife:— I have been thinking of him this winter going from Dan to Beersheba on his Mission and concluded [that] with his utter contempt of all wrappings he must freeze. I am engaged in several new enterprises, wrote Higginson to Samuel Longfellow who was abroad; one is or was the attempt to bring back the Free Soil Party to self-control and consistency from the more fascinating paths of coalition and conquest; this has failed already; and I have only seen my name in many newsunhappy paper and there has been some diabolical erratum in each one. I shall try no further. It is needless to say that these diaboli continued to annoy the author through life. It was while in Newburyport that, with the cooperation of Samuel Longfellow, Mr. Higginson undertook to edit a volume of sea poems called Thalatta. The editors apparently thought of bringing this volume out at the same time that Uncle Tom's Cabin appeared, as Higginson wrote, Thalatta is at a standstill because Mr
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, IX: the Atlantic Essays (search)
n I get a new budget of notes and materials into a fresh portfolio, and begin upon a new picture. In regard to the publication of the book of sea poems, profanely called the Marine Sam-Book in distinction from the hymn-book compiled by Messrs. Longfellow and Johnson, and popularly known as the Sam-Book, Mr. Higginson wrote to a friend:— The best result of S. L.'s [Samuel Longfellow] visit [to Europe] was to transform Thalatta from a past vision to a future reality. . . . We planned itSamuel Longfellow] visit [to Europe] was to transform Thalatta from a past vision to a future reality. . . . We planned it six years ago and now Europe has revived it all in Sam and he has proposed it once more to James T. Fields (Ticknor & Co.) and that bold youth (also fresh from Europe, these two having visited the Brownings together) consented. So the book is to begin to be printed in February and between now and then what copying and debating and selecting! In 1859, the famous Atlantic dinner was given to Mrs. Stowe, which Colonel Higginson has described in Cheerful Yesterdays. To his mother he thus repo
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIV: return to Cambridge (search)
oad for several months. After his return in the autumn, he moved his goods and chattels to Cambridge. Here he took delight in planning a new home, and in February, 1879, was quietly married to the writer of this memoir. His old friend, Rev. Samuel Longfellow, performed the ceremony. The being beauteous of Longfellow's poem, Footsteps of Angels, was my mother's sister, and the poet was present at the wedding. A visit made soon afterward to my kindred in Harper's Ferry was described by ColoLongfellow's poem, Footsteps of Angels, was my mother's sister, and the poet was present at the wedding. A visit made soon afterward to my kindred in Harper's Ferry was described by Colonel Higginson in a letter to his sister:— You can imagine nothing more curious than our arrival at Harper's Ferry. It was in the evening . . . The train stopped in a dismantled sort of station where stood an old man with soft white hair on his shoulders holding a lantern and attended by two blooming, fair-haired daughters; they seized us with joy. There seemed no houses anywhere and we set off to walk across ruined pavements feebly lighted by the one lantern. Presently they turned up a f
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
aited until the riot had ceased when he went on calm and unruffled; and my admiration, always great, sensibly rose as I saw his wonderful command of himself. Feb. 15, 1901. P. M. Lectured to Filene's workpeople on People I have met. Mar. 6, 1902. Prince Henry of Prussia here. I spoke at the dinner at the Somerset. After the Military History was off his hands he wrote, Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic, Book and Heart, and Old Cambridge. In 1900, he began a Life of Longfellow for the American Men of Letters series, and in 1902 wrote a biography of Whittier, recording in July, Have worked for ten days on Whittier—averaging 1000 words daily. The French writer, Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc), after visiting this country in the nineties, wrote an account of Colonel Higginson which was translated with the inapt title, A Typical American. The 1902 diary says:— Received proof of A Typical American, by Madame Blanc; a London translation into English sent me for re
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
c. 15.) Def. VI. Same. (In Our Book. [A Salem Fair publication.] Sept., 1844.) Same. (In Longfellow. Estray. 1846.) 1845 (Cambridge) Lay of the Humble. [Poem.] (In New York Tribune, Oct. Articles. (In Christian World, Jan., Feb.) Signed H. 1846 (Cambridge) Four hymns. (In Longfellow and Johnson. Book of Hymns.) The Railroad. [Poem.] (In Harbinger, April 4.) Holiness u 1853 (Worcester) Thalatta: a book for the Seaside, Ed. anonymously by Higginson and Samuel Longfellow. Contains three of Higginson's poems. Address on the Operation of the Anti-Liquor Law,utnam's Monthly Magazine, Sept.) Odensee. (In Putnam's Monthly Magazine, Nov.) Same. (In Longfellow, ed. Poems of Places.) A Day in Carter Notch. (In Putnam's Monthly Magazine, Dec.) Serials. (In Independent.) The book notices include a series, Live Americans, giving accounts of Longfellow, Lowell, and others. 1869 (Newport) Malbone. Same. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan
and Mrs. J. R. Lowell, 66, 67; decides to study for the ministry, 68, 69; rooms in Divinity Hall, 69; visits Niagara, 70; student life, 70-74; friendship for Samuel Longfellow, 71, 72, 78, 90, III; for W. H. Hurlbut, 72, 125-27, 280; for W. B. Greene, 72; on rights of women, 73, 92, 93, 134-38, 141, 266; on Texas question, 73, 74; Henry W., 26,37,50; visit from, 295. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 386, 424. Longfellow, Mrs., Henry Wadsworth, 50; Higginson's impression of, 72. Longfellow, Samuel, and T. W. Higginson, 71, 72, 78, 90, 114; Thalatta, 111, 159. Lowell, James Russell, 156; first impression of, 14, 15; literary earnings of, 66; Swinbur favors disunion, 181; Anti-Slavery speeches at Music Hall, 201-03. Phillips, Mrs., Wendell, on Sims case, 112. Porter, Admiral, 260, 261. Pratt, Dexter, Longfellow's village blacksmith, 8. Prescott, Harriet, letters of Higginson to, 53, 122,130,157,181; describes Higginson, 95, 96; receives literary prize, 107, 108.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
a strong personal connection, almost a family connection. With us, divinity has seldom been more, and has usually been less, than a generation removed from literary scholarship or the literary imagination. Andrews Norton is father to Charles Eliot Norton, William Henry Furness to Horace Howard Furness, Abiel Holmes to Oliver Wendell Holmes, Charles Lowell to James Russell Lowell. James Russell Lowell and Robert Traill Spence Lowell are brothers; so are Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Samuel Longfellow. There is something filial in the scholar Ticknor's pious task of editing the sermons of the Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, one generation before him. Emerson's forefathers had been clergymen for seven generations; and within his single life the early days as preacher and the later days as sacer avtes were bound each to each by natural piety. So were those of John Gorham Palfrey, George Ripley, and Octavius Brooks Frothingham, and of such clerical families as the Channings, the Abb
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
e I Fain would Linger yet, a, 311 Little women, 402 Livingston, Edward, 116, 119 Living writers of the South, 302 Livy, 128 Locke, David Ross, 151, 157, 158, 97 Locker-Lampson, F., 239 Locksley Hall, 14 Log cabin, the, 191 London, Jack, 391, 392, 393 London fun, 387 London magazine, the, 161 Lone Sentry, the, 307 Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 19, 32-41, 49, 50, 54, 63, 64, 165, 167, 173, 174, 197, 209, 228, 241, 246, 249, 275, 276, 282, 312, 362, 381, 409 Longfellow, Samuel, 197 Long Island Democrat, 261 Long Islander, the, 261 Longman's magazine, 356 n. Longstreet, Augustus Baldwin, 153, 347, 389 Louisville journal, the, 153 Lovejoy, E. P., 189 Lowell, Charles, 197, 207 Lowell, James Russell, 3, 4, 5, 14, 15, 36, 39, 50, 51, 63, 64, 67, 165, 166, 167, 168, 173, 197, 226, 228, 238, 241, 242, 245-257, 259, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 286, 303, 349, 362, 364 Lowell, Robert Traill Spence, 197 Loyal, 306 Lucas, D. B., 300, 302, 309 L
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