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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 13: the Boston Radical Club: Dr. F. H. Hedge (search)
outdone and never to be forgotten. A lesser light of this time was the Rev. Samuel Longfellow. I remember him first as of a somewhat vague and vanishing personalition entitled Hymns of the Spirit, and published under the joint names of Samuel Longfellow and Samuel Johnson, is a valuable one, and the hymns which Mr. LongfellowMr. Longfellow himself contributed to the repertoire of the denomination are deeply religious in tone; and yet I must think that among Unitarians of thirty or more years ago he was was very vehement in his expression; but his indignation had reference to Mr. Longfellow's supposed opinions, and not at all to his character, which was esteemed ofpart in the discussion of this paper, I admitted the logical consistency of Mr. Longfellow's argument. I could point out no flaw in it, and yet, I maintained that th abide in the conclusion arrived at. My last recollection of speech with Mr. Longfellow is of an evening on which I lectured at his church in Germantown. He gave
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 19: another European trip (search)
intings which deserve to live in the public esteem. Among these I would include his picture of Christ's Entry into Jerusalem, for the contrast therein shown between the popular enthusiasm and the indifference of a group of richly dressed women, seated in a balcony, and according no attention whatever to the procession passing in the street just below them. Worthy to be mentioned with this is his painting of Francesca da Rimini and her lover, as Dante saw them in his vision of hell. Mrs. Longfellow once showed me an engraving of this work, exclaiming, as she pointed to Francesca, What southern passion in that face! I was invited several times to speak while in Paris. I chose for the theme of my first lecture, Associations of Women in the United States. The chairman of the committee of invitation privately requested me beforehand not to speak either of woman suffrage or of the Christian religion. He said that the first was dreaded in France because many supposed that the woma
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 20: friends and worthies: social successes (search)
invited friends to breakfast with him at his hotel. On arriving they found only a note informing them of his departure for Europe on that very morning. I myself one day invited him to dinner with other friends, among whom was his sister, Mrs. Longfellow. We waited long for him, and I at last said to Mrs. Longfellow, What can it be that detains your brother so late? I don't know, indeed, was her reply. Your brother?cried one of the guests. I met him this morning on his way to the steMrs. Longfellow, What can it be that detains your brother so late? I don't know, indeed, was her reply. Your brother?cried one of the guests. I met him this morning on his way to the steamer. He must have sailed some hours since. A friend once spoke to him of matrimony, of which he said in reply, Marriage? I could never undergo it unless I was held, and took chloroform. Yet those who knew him well supposed that he had had some romance of his own. To his praise be it said that he was a man of many friendships, and by no means destitute of public spirit. It was from Mr. Dana that I first heard of John Sullivan Dwight, whom he characterized as a man of moderate calibre
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
2. Anthon, Charles, professor at Columbia College, 23. Appleton, Thomas G., of Boston, 104; conversation with Samuel Longfellow, 293; his appearance, 431; his wit and culture, 432; lack of serious application, 433; his voyages to Europe, 434. he convention of women ministers, 312. Hair, mode of dressing, 65. Hale, Rev., Edward Everett, his opinion of Samuel Longfellow, 293; speaks at the meeting in behalf of the Cretan insurgents, 313. Hale, George S., a friend of woman suffrageisters, 312. Huntington, Daniel, paints portrait of Mrs. Howe's father, 55. Hymns of the Spirit, collected by Samuel Longfellow and Samuel Johnson, 293. Indians, the, in New York State, 9; Samuel Ward's intercourse with, in California, 70. 9; his opinion of Samuel Ward, 73; takes Mrs. Howe to the Perkins Institution, 81, 82; his translations, 147. Longfellow, Rev., Samuel, ordained, 292; his character and convictions: hymns, 293; his essay on Law before the Radical Club, 294. Lor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 7: the corner stone laid (search)
utre-Mer. It is a curious fact that Mr. Samuel Longfellow, in his admirable memoir of his brothe list of his own early publications given by Longfellow to George W. Greene under date of March 9, 1ial L. This would seem naturally to suggest Longfellow, and is indeed almost conclusive. Yet curiolege, June 1, 1831, this being a period when Longfellow was at work there, and yet this story is who to authorship, yet not one of them suggests Longfellow at all, or affords the slightest clue by whi seem to be that the two contributions which Longfellow meant to enumerate were the story called An Lifetime (New York, 1856), after mentioning Longfellow casually, at the very end of his list of wrif him, It is a curious fact that the latter, Longfellow, wrote prose, and at that period had shown nis book, Mr. Goodrich does not find room for Longfellow's name at all. Goodrich's Recollections out it had awaited the arrival of some one to formulate its claims, and this it found in Longfellow. [1 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 8: appointment at Harvard and second visit to Europe (search)
self, he was so very sanguine as to the result of it. We expect him home the last of next week. This Northampton business is a profound secret and is not mentioned out of the family! Another extract from the same correspondent shows us how Longfellow was temporarily influenced at Brunswick, like Lowell afterwards at Cambridge, by the marked hygienic and even ascetic atmosphere of the period; an influence apparently encouraged in both cases by their young wives, yet leaving no permanent trat & affection for you both—I am as ever Your affectionate Mary—— [On outside of letter.] September 28. I have written by the same ship that brings you this. H. W. L. Also a letter to George. [Endorsement.] Mary P. Longfellow to S. Longfellow, containing a Copy of Henry's Journal Sept. 21, 1835. The journal is missing from the Ms., having doubtless been retained by the father. A long extract from it will be found in the Life, i. 216. Copenhagen, September 22, 1835. <
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 16: literary life in Cambridge (search)
76 pages, Mistakenly described by the Rev. Samuel Longfellow as nearly four hundred pages. Life,among whom Emerson stood last but one, while Longfellow was not included at all. He then appended a list of twenty-four minor authors, headed by Longfellow. Correspondence of R. W. Griswold, p. 162. t to Longfellow in this subordinate roll. Longfellow published two volumes of poetic selections, by not using it himself. It was finished on Longfellow's fortieth birthday. It was a striking iln themselves. Sumner writes from England to Longfellow that the Hon. Mrs. Norton, herself well knowd findet. . . . etc. The following is by Longfellow- Fuller of fragrance, than they And as heumoriste), one can place it to the credit of Longfellow that he had already won for himself some sorth so many. The work which came next from Longfellow's pen has that peculiar value to a biographeinate and unsettled time than was usual with Longfellow. He began a dramatic romance of the age of [8 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 17: resignation of Professorship—to death of Mrs. Longfellow (search)
Chapter 17: resignation of Professorship—to death of Mrs. Longfellow On the last day of 1853, Longfellow wrote in his diary, How barren of all poetic production and even prose production this last year has been! For 1853 I have absolutely nothing to show. Really there has been nothing but the college work. The family absorbs half the time, and letters and visits take out a huge cantle. Yet four days later he wrote, January 4, 1854, Another day absorbed in the college. But why complaiLongfellow wrote in his diary, How barren of all poetic production and even prose production this last year has been! For 1853 I have absolutely nothing to show. Really there has been nothing but the college work. The family absorbs half the time, and letters and visits take out a huge cantle. Yet four days later he wrote, January 4, 1854, Another day absorbed in the college. But why complain? These golden days are driven like nails into the fabric. Who knows but they help it to hold fast and firm? On February 22, he writes, You are not misinformed about my leaving the professorship. I am pawing to get free. On his birthday, February 27, he writes, in the joy of approaching freedom, I am curious to know what poetic victories, if any, will be won this year. On April 19 he writes, At eleven o'clock in No. 6 University Hall, I delivered my last lecture—the last I shall ever deliv
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Appendix I: Genealogy (search)
Appendix I: Genealogy [from life, etc., by Samuel Longfellow, III. 421.] the name of Longfellow is found in the records of Yorkshire, England, as far back as 1486, and appears under the various spellings of Langfellay, Langfellowe, Langfellow, and Longfellow. The first of the name is James Langfellay, of Otley. In 1510 SirLongfellow is found in the records of Yorkshire, England, as far back as 1486, and appears under the various spellings of Langfellay, Langfellowe, Langfellow, and Longfellow. The first of the name is James Langfellay, of Otley. In 1510 Sir Peter Langfellowe is vicar of Calverley. In the neighboring towns of Ilkley, Guiseley, and Horsforth lived many Longfellows, mostly yeomen: some of them well-to-do, others a charge on the parish; some getting into the courts and fined for such offences as cutting green wode, or greenhow, or carrying away the Lord's wood,—wood frLongfellow. The first of the name is James Langfellay, of Otley. In 1510 Sir Peter Langfellowe is vicar of Calverley. In the neighboring towns of Ilkley, Guiseley, and Horsforth lived many Longfellows, mostly yeomen: some of them well-to-do, others a charge on the parish; some getting into the courts and fined for such offences as cutting green wode, or greenhow, or carrying away the Lord's wood,—wood from the yew-trees of the lord of the manor, to which they thought they had a right for their bows. One of the name was overseer of highways, and one was churchwarden in Ilkley. It is well established, by tradition and by documents, that the poet's ancestors were in Horsforth. In 1625 we find Edward Longfellow (perhaps from Ilk
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Appendix III: translations of Mr. Longfellows works (search)
Appendix III: translations of Mr. Longfellows works The following catalogue of translations of Mr. Longfellow's works is based, of course, upon that prepared by Mr. Samuel Longfellow for the memoir of his brother. This is here, however, revised, corrected, and much enlarged, partly by the addition of later versions and partly by others gathered from European bibliographies and publishers' lists; this work being aided by the learned guidance of Professor Wiener of Harvard University. Eve is doubtless quite incomplete; so widely scattered are these translations among the periodicals and even the schoolbooks of different nations, and so much time and labor would be required to furnish an absolutely complete exhibit. German Longfellow's Gedichte. Übersetzt von Carl Bottger. Dessau: 1856. Balladen und Lieder von H. W. Longfellow. Deutsch von A. R. Nielo. Munster: 1857. Longfellow's Gedichte. Von Friedrich Marx. Hamburg und Leipzig: 1868. Longfellow's ältere und ne
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