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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
r, no ethnological purpose in publishing the Uncle Remus stories, and was greatly surprised to learn afterwards that variants of some of his tales had been found among the Indians of North and South America, and in the native literature of India and Siam. Variants of the Tar-Baby story, for example, have been found among the Natchez, Creek, and Yuchi Indians; Journal of American Folk-Lore, July-Sept., 1913, p. 194. among the West Indian islanders; Andrew Lang's At the sign of the Ship (Longman's Magazine, Feb., 1889). in Brazil; Romero's Contos do Brazil. in Cape Colony South African Folk-Lore Journal, vol. I.; among the Bushmen of South Africa; James A. Honey's South African Folk-Tales (1910), p. 79. along the lower Congo; The sun, New York, 17 March, 1912. in West Central Africa; The times, New York, 24 Aug., 1913. among the Hottentots; Toni von Held's Marchen und Sagen der afrikanischeu Neger (Jena, 1904), p. 72. and among the Jatakas or Birth-Stories of Buddha.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
16, 119 Living writers of the South, 302 Livy, 128 Locke, David Ross, 151, 157, 158, 97 Locker-Lampson, F., 239 Locksley Hall, 14 Log cabin, the, 191 London, Jack, 391, 392, 393 London fun, 387 London magazine, the, 161 Lone Sentry, the, 307 Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 19, 32-41, 49, 50, 54, 63, 64, 165, 167, 173, 174, 197, 209, 228, 241, 246, 249, 275, 276, 282, 312, 362, 381, 409 Longfellow, Samuel, 197 Long Island Democrat, 261 Long Islander, the, 261 Longman's magazine, 356 n. Longstreet, Augustus Baldwin, 153, 347, 389 Louisville journal, the, 153 Lovejoy, E. P., 189 Lowell, Charles, 197, 207 Lowell, James Russell, 3, 4, 5, 14, 15, 36, 39, 50, 51, 63, 64, 67, 165, 166, 167, 168, 173, 197, 226, 228, 238, 241, 242, 245-257, 259, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 286, 303, 349, 362, 364 Lowell, Robert Traill Spence, 197 Loyal, 306 Lucas, D. B., 300, 302, 309 Luck of Roaring camp, the, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 384 Lucy books, 400
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
very well, and who had just published Story's Equity Pleadings at my suggestion. He took your book, examined it, and declined it. But he was kind enough to put it into the hands of another publisher, who is not exactly in the law trade, and with whom I have concluded arrangements for the publication of both volumes of your work,—Mr. William Smith, of Fleet Street, an intelligent, gentlemanly person of about thirty-five years, whose appearance I like very much, more than that of Colburn or Longman. It will appear at Christmas (an edition of five hundred copies) in very good style. . . . On the publication of the English edition I will send a copy to Mr. Empson, the successor of Sir James Mackintosh as Professor of Law, whom I know, and who writes the juridical articles in the Edinburgh, asking his acceptance of it, and stating that it is a work in which I have great confidence, and that I should be well pleased to see it reviewed in the Edinburgh. I will do the same with Hayward, w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
and which was sold again in 1819, at the sale of the Duke of Marlborough's—Marquis of Blandford's White Knight's—library, for £ 918.16; both prices, I suppose, unexampled in their absurdity. Lord Spencer told me two odd facts about it: that Lord Blandford was not worth a sou when he bought it, and yet had given orders to go up to £ 5,000 for it, and was obliged to leave it in the auctioneer's hands above a year, before he could raise the money to pay for it; and that the last purchaser was Longman, against whom Lord Spencer, when he found out who his competitor was, would not bid, because he thought it was improper for his own bookseller to run him up, and of whom he would not afterwards buy it at any advance, because he would not suffer him to profit by his interference. The book is certainly a great curiosity, but it is made so chiefly by the folly of those who have owned it and those who have written about it. We had a most pleasant dinner and evening, Lord Spencer telling us <
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Wordsworth. (search)
nd it was published toward the close of 1798. The book, which contained also The Ancient Mariner of Coleridge, attracted little notice, and that in great part contemptuous. When Mr. Cottle, the publisher, shortly after sold his copyrights to Mr. Longman, that of the Lyrical Ballads was reckoned at zero, and it was at last given up to the authors. A few persons were not wanting, however, who discovered the dawn-streaks of a new day in that light which the critical fire-brigade thought to extt Goslar, Wordsworth and his sister returned to England in the spring of 1799, and settled at Grasmere in Westmoreland. In 1800, the first edition of the Lyrical Ballads being exhausted, it was republished with the addition of another volume, Mr. Longman paying £ 100 for the copyright of two editions. The book passed to a second edition in 1802, and to a third in 1805. Wordsworth found (as other original minds have since done) a hearing in America sooner than in England. James Humphreys,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The crisis of the Confederacy (search)
The crisis of the Confederacy [The following brief comment on The Crisis of the Confederacy—A History of Gettysburg and the Wilderness—Captain Cecil Battine, of the British Army—Longman's (a work which has been favorably reviewed by the press), appeared in the News, Charleston, S. C., of May 24th, 1905. It is by the accomplished author of Hampton and His Cavalry, Edward C. Wells, Esq., and by personal experience and study, is well qualified to duly estimate the causes of defeat in the sublime contest of the South for Constitutional rights.—Ed.] To the Editor of the Sunday News. The writer has not sufficiently studied the above book to warrant his attempting an exhaustive review, even if he were competent for the work, and space admitted of it, but still he would like to call attention to some points. Great wars come seldom, perhaps to nations, but when they do come they make or mar the welfare of countless generations, and, whether coming sooner or later, they do come t